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April 17, 1928 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-04-17

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APRIL 17, 1928.

TICKET SALE ToOPEN
FOR FOUNDERS INNE
TO OE OBSERVED SOON!
INVITATIONS HAVE BEEN SENT
TO NUMEROUS PROMINENT
ALUMNI AND OTHERS
MANY INVITEDTO ATTEND
Founder's Day To Be Celebrated In
Honor of William W. Cook,
Donor Of Law Club
Tickets for those in the Law School
who wish to attend the Founder's'day
dinner of the Lawyer's club to be held
Friday, April 20, will be placed on sale
in the Law school beginning tomor-
row, according to George P. Garver,
'28L, chairman of the Founder's day
committee. In addition, many invi-
tations were sent out recently to all
formen members of the club. Promi-
nent attorneys within reasonable dis-
tance of Ann Arbor, and to Regents
of the University, as well as the fac-
ulty of the Law school. Numerous ac-
ceptances have been received thus far,
Garver stated.
Silas Strawn, noted Chicago lawyer
and president of the American bar as-
sociation, Chief Justice Lewis H. Fead,
'OOL, and Judge Arthun H. Tuttle, '95L
of Detroit, will be among the disting-
uished guests assembled for the occa-
sion and will participate in the pro-
grain.
In the afternoon of Founder's day,
the finals on the case clubs competi-
tion for the Henry M. Campbell, '08,
prizes of $150 cash will be argued be-
fore a court consisting. of Strawn,
Judge Fead, and Judge Tuttle on the
bench, and lawyers and all other
guests as part. of the group in the
court-room. The scene for the trial
will b? the lounge of the Lawyer's
club and will be appropriately deco-
rated to resemble. a courtroom. Those
who will argue in the trial this year<
are George 13. Chistnsen, ' 9L, and
William A. Miller, '29L, of the Holmesi
club against Robert M. Kerr, '29L, and
James I. Johnson, '29L, of the Story
club.
.Dean Henry M. Bates will be the
toastmaster at a banquet that night
which will be the main function of thet
entire pnogram. All the guests will
then assemble at the Lawyer's club toG
commemorate the sixth anniversary
of the building of the club through the
gift of William W. Cook, '81. Strawn
will deliver the main address of the
evening, while Judges Tuttle and Fead
as well as a number of others of those
present will be called on to speak.
As a special feature of the banquet,t
ornamental watch fobs will be pre-
sented to graduating Law students
who have been in residence at the1
Lawyeri's club for at least two years.
This is a new idea developed by the
present administration of the club
with the idea that some special in-
signia shall be awarded all futuref
lawyers who have been members oft
the club.
STEERE TO SPEAK
ON GAS BUSINESS
"Orienting the gas business" will i 1
the subject cf an address by FrankN
W. Stecre, of Nw York, before an
engineering smoker, which is open toI
all students, to be held at the Uniont
Thursday evening. Mr. Steere iss
president of the Michigan Gas asso-
ciation and vice president and generalt
manager of the Smet-Solvay Engin-I
cering corporation.-
Mr. Steere wilI discuss trend in
the basic industries ef th countr
and their effect upon the gas indu;try,

which is supplying an increasing num-
berr of industries with fuel.
A graduate of the University, wheret
he held the fellowship of the Michi-
gan Gas association, of which lie is
liow president, M1r.- Steere has develop-t
ed and Ierfectc-d many processe.;. ini
the pro(IcUtiOi (4 city gas.
Prof. Alfred 11. White, of the de-
partmient e cliemical engineering, has
invited Mr. Steere to inspect the pro-
gress of the two research programs
Whici are sponsored at the University
Ily the Michigan Gas association and
the American Gas association.
ALUMNI ADVISORS
MEET AT DINNER
The execiti ve council of the Na-
tional Advisory committee of the Al-
uimni association headed by D. M.
Ferry, Jr., of Detroit, met last night
at the Michigan Union for a dinner
(liscussion of the various phases of
the Alumni Ten-Year program and
the Alumni University program.

GENERAL MALONE
TO GIVE LECTURE
"America's Participation in the
World War" will be the subject of
General Paul B. Malone when he lec-
tures at 7 o'clock on Wednesday night
April 25 in Natural Science auditori-
um. General Malone is well fitted to
speak on this topic, according to Ma-
jor Reinald Melberg, head of the Uni-
ve,,sity R. O. T. C., both by his record
in the World war and his reputation
as a speaker.
A graduate of West Point, Genera:
Malone commanded in France the
twenty third infantry of the second
division and later the second brigade
of the second division. For his bravery
in action and efficiency in service he
wa awarded the Distinguished Ser-
yice Cross and the Distinguished Sell-
vice Medal.
REPORT STEALING
OF SPRING COAT.S
Four new spring topcoats were stolen
yesterda.y morning between 11 and 12
o'clock from the West Medical build-
ing, according to reports telephoned
in to the office of Irving W. Truettner,
maintenanceiinspector of the Build-
ings. anld Grounds (I-e)artni cut.
Fear was expre.-sed by W. A..Daven-
port, assistant superintendent of the
department, that this theft may mark
the' be.ginning of an epidemic of such
robberies, similar to that which ;oc-
curred four years ago when secret
thieves, after hundreds of coats had
been stolen.
"I would urge students to be very
careful of their coats during the next
few days," said Mr. Davenport. "There
is no way in which the Buildings and
Grounds department can recover
missing coats, and not even any ef-
fective way in which it can stop the
thefts. If students carry their
coat's into class with them inst'ead of
leaving them in the corridors, any
epidemic of thefts will be nipped in
the bud."
STURGIS TO TALK
IN DETROIT SOON
Dr. Cyrus C. Sturgis, Director ofI
Simpson Memorial Institute, will
speak Thursday before a joint nMeCt-
ing of the Michigan Hospital Assoc-1
iation,4 of which Dr. Harley Haynes,
director of the University Hospital
is .president and the South-Eastern
Michigan Dietetic Association of
which Miss S. Margaret Gillam, dir-
ector of dietetics and housekeeping at
the University Hospital is p resicient.
The meeting will be held on April 19
and 20 at the Book-Cadillac Hotel in
Detroit.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY___
Two Pilots Prepare Giant Fokker Plane For Long Extended STUDENT EDITORS Tapping To
Flight From Fresno to Mexico And South Amercian Countries MAKE COMPLAINT Alumni Gaf

James C. Angel, former pursuit instructor for the British, Italian, North Chinese, and Bolivian armies, and
his co-pilot, Presho Stephenson, vice-president of the Beacon Airways company, are preparing their special Fokker
plane at Fresno for a 25,000 mile air tour including Mexico and ;countries in South America. "The rounding
of the Horn" is included as part of the project.

UNIVERSITY RADIO
EDUCATIONAL AID
(Continued from page one)
the current 1927-28 series is now in
progress.
It is the aim and purpose of the
Michigan Night radiocasts to offer
to ithe radio audience, timely talks on
current event topics, athletics, scien-
tific advances, medical problems and,
the like. With the entire University
Faculty available for these addresses,
any numbers of engrossing speakers
have been heard on the various pro-
grams, according to the numerous
radio letters received by the local
station and WWJ.
Broadcasting during this year and
the last has been accomplished by
means of a direct wire connection
fror the campus studio on the fourth
floor of University hall and the De-
troit station. The programs have
been handled by Mr. Abbot from the
I local end, and have generally been
broadcast every other Friday night
throughout the school year between
7 and 8 o'clock.
Ip connection with the radio broad-
casting, a special University of Michi-
gan radio bulletin containing all the
talks broadcast during the year, has
cc-rn to be a permanent publication at
the end of each year. More demands
for it have been received this year
i than ever before, according to Mr.
Abbot, who also compiles the bulle-,
jtin.

GLEE CLUB GIVES
RECESSCONCERTS
Encountering severe storms in the
neighborhood of Cadillac, the Glee
club com'pleted a two-concert cour
(luring the Easter vacation. Friday
night, April 6, they gave a concert
before a group of alumni and towns-
people at Owosso, where they were
well received. They set out the next
day for Cadillac, but bad roads,
broken spriigs on their bus, and in-
clement weather prevented them irom
keeping the Saturday night engage-
ment and they remained at Reed City.
The following morning they pro-
ceeded to Cadillac where they sang in
the churches of the city for Easter
services, and gave a program at the.
Cadillac high school on Monday af-
ternoon. The regular concert ivas
given Monday night in the Presby-
terian church.
About forty .men made the trip, in-
cluding Robert 4. Campbell, faculty
manager of the club. These two con-
certs conclude the regularly sched-
uled Glee club program for the year.
The club will remain organized how-
ever, and will practice for special f-
fairs during the spring.
PRINCETON UNIVERSITY-An in-
tramural boxing tournament was can-
celled on account of "general
apathy."
First-Class
Shoe
Repairing
Expert Worigmanship
CLARK'S SHOE
REPAIRER
321 South State

LIBRARY DISPLAYS NUMEROUS OLD
MEDICAL BOOKS DATING FAR BACK

Rare medical books dating back to
the fifteenth- century are on display
in the Main library. The volumes are
frpm the Rare Book room of the
library and are part of the Haass and
Pilcher Vesalius Incunabula of medi-
cal books. There are not more than
20,000 incunabulae (books printed be-
fore 1500 by movable type) on record
today, and of these less than 10 per
cent are medical boks.
The exhibit contains books which
deal with the various conceptions of
the medical iscience. In the pre-
Vesalian era an erreneous id"a con-
cerning anatomy was advanced in a
book published by Mundinus which
was printed in 1521. In 1543 Vesaliui ,
the found(,r of the science c' anl-t,cmy,
publishled a book, "Fabrica," which
has had a profound influence on mod-
ern medicine.
In c-mneomoration of th: 300th an-
niversary of t 1 " publi ,hing o f
IHarvey's expla nation c1' the circula-
tion of the bkiod, several of the
-lithor's works are on di play. "l)e
1 -tn Ccrdis," hi; wont on the sub-
is second only to I'briCi in im-
pcr. ace to mdicine.
Se. -ral of the books are so rare that
there re cnly on: or two other
records J copies in the United States.
One cf -se volumcA is "Lumen An-
ime," pub.1:h'd in an -encycloledia by
Sorg in -.7. Another is I'liny's
"llist,cria N uralia," a co1ection of
subjects as history, arts, the natural
1 U E"
Rama small
car . o°
a week up...
see twice as
much.
Motor Map t
IPARTQIUJTOWRIP46nc.1
AUTO .iRVI CE ABnpROA
s5I FIFTMAVe. NEWYCRK CITY

sciences, and medicine.
One of the oldest medical books is
"Pharetra," ,printed - about 1472 by
Mentelin, a Stras'sburg printer who
was also a scribe and an illuminator.
The borders and beginning initials
were all ilettered by the author.
Abhumeron Avenzahar, a famous
physician of the 15th century, wrote
one of the most valuable Arabic med-
ical books, which was one of the few
to contradict "Galenism."
The exhibit was arranged for the
benefit of the American Anatoruy as-
sociation, amid the Bi3ological confer-
ence which was*held in Ann Arbor
during the vacation, and will con-
tinue during the present week.

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