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April 03, 1928 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-04-03

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___________ THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, APRI

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications-.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.s
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited n this paper and the local news pub-
fished herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, As second class matter. Special rate
of-postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General..
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail,.
r'$4.50
& 4fices: Ann Arbor Press Buildig, May-
Mard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business arsr
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
10I H. CHAMBERLIN
' Nxitr............Ellis B. Merry
EditorMichigan Weekly Charles E. Behyrner
Staff Editor..............Philip C. Brooks
City Edito' ..........Cortland C. Smith
Womens Editor ..,.,.....Marian L. Welles
Sarts, ditor .......Herbert E. Vedder
crater~ Books and Music.Vincent C. Wall, Jr.
Asaitant City (ditor ... Richard C. Kurvink
Night Editors
Robert v. jFinch G. Thomas MKean
J. Stewart Uooker Kenneth G. Patrick
-Paul J Kern Nelson J. Smith, Jr.
Milton Kirshbaum
Reporters
esther Anderson sally Knox
Mvargaret Arthur lohn H. Maloney
lex A. IBochnowski Marion McDonald
jean Campbell Charles S. Monroe
Jessie Church Catherine Price
$lanchard W. Cleland Harold L. Passman
Clarence N. Edelson Morris W. Quinn
Miargaret Gross. Rita Rosenthal
Valbor% Egeland Pierce Rosenberg
Marjorie Vollmer E1leanor Scribner
James 3. Freeman Corinne Schwarz
Robert J.. Gessne Robert, G. Sibar
)laine E. Gruber Howard F. Simon
\lice Hagelshaw George E. Simons
oseph I. Howell Rowena Stillman
f .Vallace Hushen Sy'via Stone
Charles R Kaufman George Tilley
Villia.i F. Kerby - iert. K. Tritscheer
wrence R. Klei*' Edward L. Warner, Jr
Iobald J Kline Benjamin S. Washer
, Lair git oseph Zwerdlinsh
1I'Y1NESS STAFF
l lephonu 21214
=USINESS MANAGER
WILLIAM C. PUSCH
%..mam Manager ..George H. Annable, jr.
Advertising... .......Richard A. Mew
Advertising...E.........dward L. Hulse
'advertising............John W. Ruswickel
Accounts................Raymond Wachter
Circulation...........George B. Ahn, Jr.
Publication..............Harvey Talcott
Assistants
George Bradley AsRay Hofelich'
Karie Brummeler Hal A. Jaehn
Tames Carpenter James Jordan
Charles K. Correll Marion Kerr
flarbara Cromell Thales N. Lenington
M1ary Dively Catherine MKinve
"essie V. Egeland Dorothy Lyons
Qtia Felker Ale K. Scherer
Katherine Frohne Georg- Spater
Douglass Fuller Ruth Thompson
Beatrice Greenberg Herbert E. Varnum
elemn Gross Lawrence Walkley
E. J.' Hammer Hannah Wallen
Carl W. Hammer
TUESDAY, APRIL 3, 1928
Night Editor-K. G. PATRICK
VANDENBERG
Congratulations for Senator Arthur
Hendrick Vandenberg, new United
States senator from Michigan, on the
ocsasion of his appointment to that
position last Saturday might well be
extended to Governor Fred Green
who made the appointment and the
people of the state whose representa-
tive he will be in Washington. Not
only is the Grand Rapids publisher
particularly well fitted by experience
for the important post, but he will
doubtless be the choice of the people
at the polls for the long term next
November; and when he enters the
Senate as the result of that election
next March 4, he will bring to the
state the advantage of outranking
newly elected Senators who will be
'swor;1 in at the same time.
Praises before a man has assumed
an office are the idlest form of peror
ation, but high hopes for accomplish-
ment are not at all out of place. Be-
sides the advantage of youth (Senator
Vandenberg is 46 years old), the new
legislator brings with him a fresh-
ness of viewpoint that should be re-

freshing in the counsels of the na-
tional body. Carrying no previous al-
liances or entrammelling promises,
the new senator will be free to choose
what connections he will in the ,Sen-
ate, and to make only what commit-
ments he desires.
His responsibility is solely to him-
self to make good in the position,
and the people of the state will not
prove ungrateful in a political way
if he succeeds. Youth, fresh vigor,
and the best wishes of his constitu-
ents Senator Vandenberg carries to
the office. Such a combination seems,
on the surface, to point over'whelm-
ingly to a long and successful ca-
reer in public life.
S UMER SESSION
With the school year on the eve
of spring vacation, and the gradua-
tion in June a matter of but two
month:, it is interesting to note that
the schedule for the 1928 Summer
session, prepared by Dean Edward
Krlus, has been completed. Annually
a period of high scholastic caliber,
the summer schedule this year in-
cludes its usual quota of exceptional
tachers from all parts of the world,
in addition to the regular facilities of
University work afforded.
To those serious students who de-
sire to supplement their regular aca-
demic work in a season when the

tion of a complete automobile ban,
which may prevent the indulgence of
pleasant summer sports, such as
swimming and picnicking, on the part
of the summer students.
Nevertheless, the chance to work
under such scholars as Prof. H. A.
Kramers of the physics deparitment
at Rijks university of Utrecht, Prof.
Walter Agard, classicist of the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin, Dean George
Carruthers of Rollins college, and
Prof. Robert Hegner, zoologist of
Johns Hopkins university, to mention
only a few, is a rare opportunity. The
Summer session will doubtless be
smaller in enrollment this year than
in the past, largely due to the auto-
mobile ban, but in academic eminence
the program arranged by Dean Kraus
ranks favorably with any of the past
summer periods of the University.
PROGRESS
A short time ago the Union an-
nounced the financialtstatement for.
the six months ending in February.
It showed an enormous gain in finan-
cial operations over the figures for
the same period of previous years and
showed losses in only two depart-
ments. At the present rate of improve-
ment its indebtedness should be paid
off in five years.
Yesterday, the decision of the board
o governoys was announced to close
in the porches on the first and second
floor. This is a decided improvement
toward more room for the dances and
more space for the various banquets
and luncheons which are given at the
Union. At this time it was also de-
cided to pave the alley beside Mimes
theater and action was also taken on
this so that it will be completed soon.
Clearly the Union is moving for-
ward. Though advances are still to
be made, its more efficient organiza-
tion than that of the past i being
felt in all branches.
THE SOUTH POLE FLIGHT
Commander Richard E. Byrd, con-
queror of the North Pole and the At-
lantic by air, is now busily engaged
in preparations for the severest test
of his career-the conquest of the
Antarctic. Commander Byrd will
leave this summer with a parity of
70, among whom will be included
Prof. Lawrence M. Gould, of the geo-
logy department, for the supreme ef-
fort to reach the South Pole by air.
The venture entails a hop by plane
the distance from Chicago to New
York and return, over a broad pla-
teau, 10,000 feet high, covered with
ice barriers, the mightiest glaciers on
earth, treacherous mountains and
towering cliffs. 'The Antarctic trip
is made even more hazardous by the
fact that many other hardships un-
known to man because of lack of ex-
perience are likely to be encountered,
and because weather conditions are
so erratic that the hazards of making
any flight of longer duration than 10
to. 12 hours are tremendous.
Whether Commander Byrd is suc-
cessful in reaching the pole, if the
expedition is able to study the ter-
rain, and if the scientists are able to
learn more of the flora and fauna,
geographical and meteoological con-
ditions in the Antarctic, the trip will
have accomplished much. The world
is anxiously awaiting the start of the
expedition and wishes the party a
safe voyage and return; to people in
this section it will be doubly fascin-
ating in view of the fact that Com-
mander Byrd has twice appeared in
Ann Arbor and because of the rela-
tionship of Professor Gould, Michigan
representative, to the expedition.

CAMPUS OPINION
Anonymous communications will be
disregarded. The names of communi-
eants will, however, be regarded as
confidential upon request. Letters pub-
lished should not be -construed as ex-
pressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily.
THE PIRATES OF PENZANCE
To the editor.:
The peurile performance of assum-
ing the role of professional critic of
an amateur play is extremely well
executed in the asinine outbreak of
two upstarts listed as sophomores in
the Student Directory of the Univer-
sity of Michigan, who condescended to
take notice of a play produced by
students of the Ann Arbor high school.
By a slight change of phrasing their
own words in The Michigan Daily of
Saturday, March 31, seem quite ap-
plicable to their own case..
"Age cannot wither oand amateurs
cannot state the infinite variety of
"chestnut critics." "From the open-
ing" sentence, wherein the flow of
nonsense 'rippled aimlessly to the
closing paragraph, Simons and Mon-
roe could maintain their "reputation
for seeing the end of ham pro-
ductions."
Although the form and content of
the criticism were poor, for collegej

T/M!D ROLL
KEEP
- ANIIVALS
AT THE CLOSING meeting of the
Michigan Academy it was resolved
that wild animals should not be im-
ported into the state except for scien-
tific purposes.
* * *

IF I'HIS IS to be taken
it means a great deal more
Registrar Smith.
* *

seriously
work for

IN THE FIRST place he will have
to be more careful about allowing stu-
dents from Ohio to enter the Uni-
versity. As for Chicago, he will have
to place a complete ban on the sub-
ject.
* * *
THE COACHES AT the Field House
don't like the idea for they fear that
it will mean an end to their football
supremacy if they age not allowed to
import any more Wolverines.
* * * '
UNION TO AMEND AGAIN
IT SEEMS THAT there is still
something the matter with the Union
constitution and they are going to
propose another amendment. We
think that the best thing they could
do would be to junk the constitution
and get a new one.
* * *
IN MAKING THE new constitution
the quorum for voting on the new
proposals should be 10 instead of 600.
One can always go into the lobby and
rope in ten students to vote, but when
it comes to 600 there has to be at
least 200 proxy votes to make the
thing go.
* * *
WE TOLD YOU SO
THE SENIOR CLASS is still willing
to take your dues if you want to pay
them. We knew that they would re-]
fuse the money, BUT NOT TODAY
WE SHOULDN'T WONDER if the
class was still willing to accept the
dues on graduation day. If the class
won't the treasurer will do you a
personalfavor and take the money
from you.
LAW SMOKER
THE FRESHMAN LAW smoker was
hel& last night and the boys were all
prepared for a rush of Engineers, but
the boys who wear the jackets seem-
ed to think that lawyers are much
safer to play with in tuxedos than
in street clothes.
rtAT THAT WE look forward with
interest to the swingout affair when
we shall be safe in the midst of the
literary class, about one thousand
strong, and see the fun. We men-
tioned the thousand for our own safe-
ty.
MORE RESOLUTIONS
AT THE SAME meeting of the
Michigan Academy mentioned above
the members resolved that (better
knowledge of the forests should be
had. Now here is a good resolution
Sandyet they close the arboretum.
HOW IN THE world can students
learn how trees react in the night
ime if there are gates on the arbor-
etum?
GRID NOTES
IT IS EXPECTED that Mayor
Thompson will come to the banquet,
but no one knows definitely. If he
comes, he has assured the committee,
he will not bring any of the gun men
with him. After all he is a Yale
graduate.
* * *
THAT'S REALLY THE truth, Wil-
liam Hale Thompson graduated from
Yale college, but Yale never brags
about it.
* * *
ON THESE ALUMNI
THE, PRESIDENT HAD a lot of
things to say to the alumni the other
night at one of their banquets. He
told them that they never thought of
the University except at footballs

games.
* * * ,
PERSONALLY WE THINK that
they think very little of the Uni-
versity even then, for it is fairly well
known that the alumni of the Univer,
sity of Michigan pay less money tol
our athletes than the alumni of prac-
tically any other college in the West
and probably less than any other
school in the country. None of the
others could pay less than nothing.
MR. WILL ROGERS
YESTERDAY WE .WENT over to
the Union to interview Will Rogers
with the rest of The Daily Staff. He
seems to be a good scout and told

THEATER
BOOKS
MUSIC
TONIGHT: Dailes Frant,
pianist, assisted by Guy Maer,
in recital in Pattengill auditor-
lum, at 8 o'clock.
TONIGHT: The Rockford Play-
ers present George Bernard
Shaw's "Candida'" in the Whitney
theater at 8 o'clock.
* * *
"CANDIDA"
A review, by Vincent Wall
Thse who regard dramatists as
purveyors of amusement were proba
bly a little disappointed at Shaw last
evening. "Candida" is a wonderful
drama between the covers of a book,
but it plays rather slow. It is not a
witty, brilliant epigrammist who is
writing "Candida;" nor a canny
dramatist intermingling the froth
and foam of antithetic aphorisms with
plot interest; but a rather rebelliou
Shaw, who has created an incisive
and subtle study of English domes.
ticity.
In so doing he has created not six
characters, but six people, definitely
described within his dramatic limits,
and living certain moments of their
lives on that space bounded by the
proscenium arch, flats and back wall
which we call a stage. To produce
the play successfully every one of
the six must be made to stand out in-
dividually as a living entity-or the
production fails. That is why it has
been done so infrequently either in
England or America; and why Rich-
ard Mansfield withdrew it from his
repertory after rehearsing it a whole
season.
Judged 'in 'this light, the Rockford
Players were eminently successful.
Candida-"who never knew the secret
in the poet's heart"-lived again under
the Pygmalion-like touches of Elsie
Herndon Kearns. The character was
to Shaw the symbol of universal wo-
manhood-the woman who is mother,
wife, coquette, and all this hidden be-
hind the mask of a Mona Lisa smile.
Marchbanks could describe her much
better than I, for he was a poet, and
she was a woman about whom men
write' poetry. It can only be said that
Miss Kear-ns' performance was as re-
markable as she is-not perhaps as
vivid as her Hedda Gabler, but more
profound, anid at least done with the
same artistry.
The most inspired moments of the
play occur in the last act; and they
are the moments that stand out in
the work of Robert Henderson as
Marchbanks and Charles Warbuton
as James Morell. Candida is forced
to her choice between a "wretched
little nervous disease" and "a pig-
headed parson," between Morell, who
glories in his physical strength and
Marchbanks, who is a giant in his
conception of the truth.
Both Warburton and Henderson
aue excellent in delineating respec-
tively the pompdus windbag and the
neurotic poet. No less so were the
others-Kate Holland Patton, as Pros-
sy; Franz Rothe as Burgess; and
Samuell Bonell as Lexy Mills. It is
a bill well acted by the Players, and
it is regretted that it is to be the last.
* *
THE FACULTY RECITAL
A review, by Nicholas Pickard
Sunday afternoon, another concert
in the Faculty Concert series of the

School of Music was given in Hill
auditorium. The school symphony or-
chestra, conducted by Samuel Lock-
wood, with Marian Freeman and Al-
b6rt Lockwood as soloists, gave two
short compositions for orchestra by
Moscowski and Mozart, a Czardas of
Hubay and a gigantic Brahms concer-
to. The Moscowski, a Spanish Dance,
was light and trivial, and the Motet
of Mozart was very likely one of those
whims, which took Mozart about half
an hour to compose, but which never-
theless inbues all that is lovely in mu-
sic. The Hubay Czardas, in the man-
ner of the Liszt rhapsodies was slight-
ly heavier. Composed as a violin con-
certo, it exhibits the slow and then
rapid tempo of the Hungarian dance,
but falls short of the class of music
attained by Liszt, Dvorak or Brahms
in this field. Marion Freeman's play-
ing was rather mechanical and her
tone, harsh and grating.
Of Brahms' second piano concerto,
opus No. 83, no apter term can be
found than to say that it was typically
Brahmsian. Profound, noble and migh-
ty, it surged through four gripping
movements; it is a concerto that
should be considered a historic event
in the development of pianistic litera-
ture. It was capably delivered by
Albert Lockwood, who is an excellent

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