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April 01, 1928 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-04-01

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY. AP

I.

s... .. ,. __ ,... .. .......,, .. .... y ..,..... ,;..., yx. ..

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Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
itled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it. or not otherwise
redited in this naper and the local news pub.
ished herein).
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Yichigan, as second class matter. Special rate
Af potage granted by Third Assistant Post-
uastei General.
Subscription by carrier. $4.00: by mail,
Offices. Ann Arbor Press Building, May.
ard Street.
Phones! Editorial, 4925; Business 21214.
EI)ITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGINGEDITuR
10 H.' CHAMBERLIN
C ditor....... ........ ..Ellis B. Merry
Editor Michigan Weekly..Charles E. Behymer
-taff E;dior.............. Philip C. Brooks
City Editor.......... Courtland C. Smith
Women's Editor......... Marian L. Welles
Spors vditor..........Herbert E. Vedder
T'heater, Books and Music.Vincent C. Wall,.Jr.
fssistant City Editor....Richard C. Kurvink
Night Editors
Robert E. Finch C .' Thomas McKean
. Stewart Hooker Kenneth G. Patrick
Paul I Kern Nelson J. Smith, Jr.
Milton Kirshbaum
R eporters
Esther Anderson Sally _ knox
Margaret Arthur Toon H. Maloney
\1ex A. Bochnowski Marion McDonald
jean Campbell Charles S. Monroe
fessie Church Catherine Price
Blanchard W. Cleland Harold L. Passman
Clarence N. et-o- Morris W. Quinn
Margaret Gross Rita Rosenthal-
Valborg Egeland Pierce Rosenberg.
Marjorie Folimet Eleanor Scribner
James B Freeman Corinne 'Schwarz
Robert J. Gessne 1 Robert G. Silbar
Elaine E. Gruber Howard F. Simon
Alice Hagelshaw Ceorge E. Simons
oseph 1?. howell Rowena Stillman
J. Wallace Hushen Sylvia Stone
Charles R. Kaufmapn George,'FTilley
Wiliar F. Kerby Bert. K. Tritscheller
iawrence R. Kleir Edward L. Warner, Jr..
Donald J. Klire Benjamuin S. Washer
ack L. Lait, Jr Joseph Zwerdliasg
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
WILLIAM C. PUSCH.
Assistant .Manager...George H. Annable, Jr.

large for effective selection), some
such interested person as the business
manager, and three students.
The first four seem to be logical
members of the board. The selec-
tion of the three students, however,
is more difficult. They might con-
ceivably include the retiring presi-
dent and the recording secretary. An-
other suggestion would make them the
vice-presidents of the literary, law,
and engineering colleges which are
perhaps most interested.
The latter plan would seem to be
favored by the popular control which
the student body might very proper-
ly exercise through the continued
election of the vice-presidents. Coun-
terected by the recommendations of
the recording secretary and the pres-
ident of the aspirants, as is practiced
cn the publications, it would also
reasonably limit the efforts of those
officers to name their successors. The
vice-presidents, on the other hand,
acquainted with the Union but not
too personally, might add a detached
viewpoint.
Composed of an alumnus, a faculty
member, and a student,- all keenly in-
terested in the welfare of the Union,
however, the appointed board should
be well able to draft an effective
means of execution. When the plan
is presented, it shouldaattract the un-
qualified support of all Union mem-
bers on the campus.
"FAREWELL"
Born on a plain Ohio farm, gradu-
ated from a University by working
his own way, elevated by the people
of his statento thegovernorship and
then to the United States Senate; and
then, returning at the climax of his
career to his boyhood home a candi-
date for the nation's highest office
only to be called away by a higher
Power-such was the career of Sen-
ator Frank Willis.
The loss to Ohio., where he was by
all odds the leading "favorite son,"
is a loss to the whole nation-, even
though the nation as a whole probably
looked unsympathetically on his cam-
paign for the presidency. Few more
upright, more honest, more staunch-
ly morpl men have achieved success-
ful careers in public life, and few
have left behind them 'the enviable
record of the Ohio senator. Controll-
ing as he did the powerful Republi-
can political machine of Ohio, the tre-
mendous potentialities of that ma-
chine were never directed to corrupt
practices or unfair measures. Even in
his final campaign against Herbert
Hoover there was nothing but the
most open challenge, entirely on, the
surface and aboveboard, against the
commerce secretary.
To calculate the shift of political
strength in Ohio which accompanies
his death is not a particularly fitting
activity .so close upon his death. It
should suffice to say that even the
most ardent of his political antagonists
will join with his countless friends
in paying a last tribute to the man
who so profoundly affected the life
of his state and nation, a man whose
honesty, integrity, and ability as an
orato and as a politician were never
questioned.
Spring and the advertising of .the
local merchants concerning topcoats
can't seem, to jibe. The weather man
and the agency man should get to-
gether in a little business combine.
CAMPT TOPTNTN I

I

G
'M
cl
Bs
1
K<
K
B
Ii

dvertising..........Richard A< Meyu.
dvertising...... ... dward L. Hulse
dvertising............John W. Ruswinckel
eeounts...............Raymond Wachter
irculation..........George B. Ahn, jr.
ublication...............Harvey Talcott
Assistants
eorge Bradle Ray Hofelich
arie Brummeer Hal A. Jaehn-
ames Carpenter Tames Jordan
h1arles K. Correll Mvarion Kerr
arbara Cromell Thales N. Lenington.
dary Dively Catherine .McKinven
essie V. Egeland Dorothy Lyons
na Felker Alex K. Scherer
atherine Frohne . George Spater
ouglass Puller Ruth Thompson
eatrice Greenberg Herbert E. Varnum
[den Gross Lawrence Walkley
T. Hammer Hannah Wallen

E-D L'w
THE
ENGINEERS
BELIEVING TI!AT THE law stu-
dents took the now famous slide rule
which was lost by the Engineering
school, students of that branch of the
University did their best to break
up the Crease dance Friday night.
ALL OF THOSE who took part are
known and will be prosecuted to the
full extent of the law.*
* * * -
THE LAWYERS ENJOYED the ex-
citement and all of them said that
they wouldn't have missed the dance
for anything.*
* * "
REGENTS TAKE OFF BAN
ON STUDENT AUTOMOBILES
ANN ARBOR, (Special)- At their
meeting the Regents of the University
voted to remove the ban on student
automobiles. The president introduced
the resolution and it was carried
without opposition.*
* * *
"I WAS INDEED happy to learn
that the ban is off," Assistant to the
dean Emery said when interviewed
by a Rolls reporter. "I always thought
that the students should be allowed
to use their cars."*
I t I
ACCORDING TO REPORTS from
various sources the student body does
not want the new liberty granted, and
is petitioning the Regents to put the
ban back."
CALVIN COOLIDGE WILL
ATTEND GRID BANQUET
WASHINGTON, D. C., (Special)-
Calvin Coolidge, thirtieth president of
the United States, has announced that
he will attend the annual Gridiron
Banquet given by the Michigan chap-
teq of Sigma Delta Chi.*
"I have long -desired to attend one
of these banquets," the president told
a Rolls representative yesterday, "and
I sincerely hope that I shall win the
oil can. I'll admit that I don't do
much talking," the president contin-
ued, "but then I could if it were neces-
sary."*
* * *
IT HAS LONG been thought by
those who know about such things
that the gates were a waste of money
and now this point is being proved
by the action of the authorities.*
* * *
STUDENTS GIVEN FREE SHOW
BY BUTTERFIELD INTERESTS
DETROIT, Michigan, (Special) -
Feeling that he has made too much
money from the students during the
past year Baron Butterfield has de-
cided that this week, beginning to-
day is to be free to all students.*
* * *
HAVING PROMISED THE students
free shows whenever a Michigan team
won a major championship the But-
terfield interests thought that they
would have to give about six of them
in the average year, but this was not
an average year.
* * I
REALIZING THAT THE students
have not' had a free show since the
days when they took it, the theater
interests have designated this week

as free show week.*
HOOVER DROPS OUT OF RACE
FOR REPUBLICAN NOMINATION,

THEATER
BOOKS
THIS AFTERNOON: The Fac-
ulty Concert in Hill auditorium
at 4:15 o'clock.
TONIGHT AND TOMORROW
NIGHT: The Rockford Players
present Elsie Herndon Kearns in
Bernard Shaw's "Candida" in tie
Whitney theater at 8 o'clock.
TOMORROW NIGHT: The Mich-
igan Theater league presents Will
Rogers in Hill auditorium at s
o'clock.
CANDIDA
Janies Moreli .... Charles Warburton,
Prossy........Kate Holland Patton
Lexy Mills......... Samuel Bonnell
Burgess ............... Franz Rothe
Candida......Elsie Herndon Kearns
Eugene Marchbanks
-Rober~t Henderson
The above is the cast of Bernard
Shaw's play, "Candida," which will
open tonight at the Whitney. George
Jean Nathaan has said that Shaw's
greatness is founded not on his bril-
liant propaganda, which was so pow-
erful a factor in inciting our fathers
to deeds of intellectual daring-do, but
upon his masterful handling of love
and sentiment. At any rate Shaw was
one of the first to make an honest
woman out of the biological urge.
Candida presents a strong argument
in favor of Nathan's judgment; the
play is the portrayal of the struggle
of two men for one woman. Morell,
one of the two contenders for Can-
dida's love, is a militant man of God,
intelligent, energetic, and practical
while Marchbanks, the other, is a
poet who has the gift of divine mad-
ness and who can live simultaneously
in ethereal places and in gutters.
Candida seems to feel that it is en-
tirely just that these two men should
be contending for her, she is well
aware that she is a person through
whom the currents of life and love
flow strongly; she realizes that she
is a woman and (without any senti-
mental connotation) a mother of men,
and is content, almost placid, in being
just that.
Candida presents perhaps more of
a challenge to the abilities of the
Rockford Players than any other play
that they have done this season, notI
even excepting Hedda Gabler. It will
be a great triumph for them if they
can succeed in avoiding the pitfalls
of4 slushy sentimentality and farce
that beset this play, and if they can
keep to the true lyic mood in whichl
it was written.j
H.IM.
* * *
THE MIMES
Last night concluded the week's
production of "The Devil's Disciple."i
It may have been rough in spots and I
intrinsically poor Shaw, but it was
Shaw, and in general was much better
liked as a play by most patrons-3
judging from the box office- than
some preceding pot boilers and hokum
shows. Moreover, it was well played
for the most paigt, with several dis-
tinctive individual performances on
the parts of Dougall, Kleutgen, Ten-
nant and several others.
"The Beggar on Horseback" which
was to be produced next, will proba-
bly be delayed until Mr. Shuter is
able to direct it personally, and it is
hoped that "The Masque and the
Face"-a comedy from the Italian,

will fill the breach.
THE DALIES FRANTZ RECITAL
A recital for one and two pianos
will be given Tuesday evening, April1
3, in Pattengill auditorium by DaliesI
Frantz, assisted by Guy Maier. Mr.
Frantz, a Julliard student of piano
and organ in the School of Music, is
one of the most brilliant pupils of
Mr. Maier and Palmer Christian. He
is planning to complete his study
abroad next season. The program
is as follows:
I s

11

SCHOOL IN PARIS
All Expenses Including round
trip steatntshiip fare for TWO
Months
$7501
Directed by Homer A. DesMarals
Arranged by M.Travel Club,
Grand Rapids, Michigan.
RIBBONS AND
SUPPLIES
for all makes of
TYPEWRITERS
Rapid turnover, fresh stock linsures
best quality at a moderate price.
0. D. M ORR L6L
17 NIckels Arcade. Phone 66

PE NMAKERS
SEE
Rider for Pens
HIGH QUALITY AND STANDARD PRICES
PLUS SNAPPY SERVICE
REPAIR SERVICE

FOWLER'S

TEA

ROOM

Alterations.
Dressmaking-
Hemstitching
JEWELRY
and
SWEATERS
The Quality
Hemstitching Shop
721 N. Univ. Phone 9712

Brealgfast-Luncheon-Dinner
OPEN SUNDAYS
Just try it-You'll like it'

229 So. State

Small Gifts

ii

I

Carl W. hammer

_ _

SUNDAY, APRIL 1, 1928'
Night Editor-MILTON .KIRSHBAUM
STARTiNG THE MERIT SYSTEM
Those interested in consistently ef-
ficient management of Union activi-
ties may be encouraged by the action
of the board of directors of the Union
ye'sterday in both approving the merit
system of naming the president and
rcording secretary and in naming a
committee to devise an executory
plan.
The advantages of selection based on.
merit have long been recognized.
Plans for putting it into effect have
always had the support of faculty
and alumni interested in the welfare
of the Union. On two previous occa-
sions, constitutional amendments have
been proposed at meetings of Unionx
members; but though they were high-
ly favored, political complications
have prevented them from obtaining
the necessary two-thirds majority.
In the present instance, the out-
look though prpmature, is more en-
couraging. Obviously, the new method
could not go into effect this year. If
passed this spring, for operation next
year, then, it would not interfere with
any possible political balances this
spring. Local politicians may caucus
and campaign this spring to their
hearts' content. Then, with more than
a year's advance notice, all aspir-
ants to the two positions for the
term after next, might put their hopes
in a responsible board recognizing
ability to conduct Union affairs rath-
er than in a political campaign which
would merely test their genius at
political organization.
It is also particularly encouraging
that the movement toward the.merit
system has started within the Union,
itself. According to the constitution,
any amendment might be suggested
by petition, with the currence of 200;
students. Undoubtedly, many times
that number would favor it. Yet:
brought before the board by Presi-J
dent Jeffries, the idea has secured theJ
approval of that board with the ap-
pointment of a committee to draft a
plan.,
The details of the plan are, of!
course, very important. In previous
discussions, appointment by a boardl
and popular choice have been sug-
gested. Knowing the Union organi-f
zation as it does, the board appointed.
should be the best judge of the plant
to be submitted.
If the former were considered, The,

Demand
GRAPE
4EEE
the ORiGINAL

Back Again, April 2
AT HILL AUDITORIUlM
Auspices of Ann Arbor Theatre League
DON'T FORGET THE DATE
Mon dayAAprl"2
Tickets available all next week at Wahr's
State Street Book Store
Prices: $1.QO for lower floor, with
a few at $1.50 and $2.00. Rear
rows, balcony, 75 cents.

OPTICAL
DEPARTMENT
Lenses and Frames made
To Order
Optical Prescriptions
Filled
H ALLERS
State St. Jewelers

,
_'!

RA E 1I
TODAY-MONDAY
Somethilg to Roast About
Lillian Gish
inl
"Annie Laurie"
This "Ad" with 14c
Scotch Music on the Piano
(No Bag Pipes)

This is Will's Third Appearance-We
Know What to Expect

All

, _ :1

%.A-%4IVL.L-Jb. '..KA I IJ
Annonynous communications will be
disregarded. The names of communi
cant z will, however, be regarded as
confidential upon request. Letters pub-
lished should not be construed as ex-
Pressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily.

!F.

11

IXT A CITTrn',FsxT

ON THAT VOTE WVVAIINmUTN
To the editor: Herbert Hoover,I
I have no desire to comment on the Republican party
caustic letter of Professor Carver date for the nom3
printed in Saturday's Daily further ed that he does
than to regret that he should still
persist in juggling the figures on the "I DO NOT can
recent vote of the Literary Faculty fice," Hoover ex
upon the plan of the University Col- correspondent, "I
lege. His objection to accepting the too many politic
actual vote of 103 to 82 as the ex- do not care to a
pression of the will of that Faculty them."*
appears from his letter to be that a
proper comparison would not be pos-. WITH THIS A
sible with the vote of 66 to 25 on the Lowden ranks w
same proposition in the Colleges og panic and they
Engineering and Architecture, where telegrams urging
instructors are under the rules of the and take the nomi
College not permitted to vote in legal *
faculty meetings. NO FLUNKS
To set his mind at rest, he is ad- -
vised that in the committee of theI IT WAS ANN
whole;, where all instru:,tors we-re by the faculty t
permitted to vote, the result in the no flunk gradesg
said Colleges stood 85 to 22 as against It was the genera
G6 to 25 in the legal faculty meeting.' ion that all stud
This is chiefly of interest in showing work well and
that the younger men in both the would be no grad
great Faculties of the University are ing standard.*
more strongly in opposition to the *

, D. C. (Special)-
leading figure in the
* and a likely candi-
ination has announc-
not choose to run.*
* *
re to hold public of-
plained to a Rolls
feel that there are
ians in office and I
ssociate myself with
NNOUNCEMENT the
were thrown into a
sent Hoover many
him to reconsider,
nination.*
* *
THIS YEAR
OUNCED yesterday
that there would be
given out this year.
1 consensus of opin-
ents had done their
accordingly there
ides below the pass-
*: *

An
That Mis
returned
training
ill New Y
full of
-wardrobe
Con
N

flouncing
ss McIntyre has .just
from an inteitsie
course in costum out
York City, and is brim
suggestillns for your

MAY FESTIVAL',
Ann Arbor, May 16, 17, 18, 19
NATIONAL BUREAU
FOR THE
ADVANCEMENT OF MUSIC
New York
February 27, 1928
Mr. Charles A. Sink, President,
University Musical Society,
Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Li
(I.

Prelude and' Fugue in E Flat Major
-Bach
Air and Variations (Harmonious
Blacksmith)...............Handel
Sonata, Opus 110.........Beethoven'
Mr. Frantz
II
Pavane Pour Une Infante Defunte
-Ravel
Ballade in G Minor (Opus 23)..ChopinI
Mr. Frantz
III
Liebeslieder Waltzer (2nd Set)
-Brahms-Maier
Etude .in F Minor ... Chopin-Maier
Three Pieces (from "Cinq Pieces
Faciles").............. Strawinsky
Siamese Sketch ..........Eichheim
Turkey In The Straw ... D. FrantzI

ostuincr
Ecade ~ I
.,ar
eane I

My

nsulting Ct
Nickels Ar

-%0%0%0%^

dear Mr. Sink:
I have been interested in* seeinIg the announce-
ment of the, Thirty-fifth Annual May Festival at
Ann Arbor, which, according to the programs
offered, promises to be one of the most interesting
of the series. It is especially gratifying to see the
recognition given therein to so many sterling Ameri-
can artists, and to our own resident composers, such
as Messrs. Grainger and Hyde. Not the least of
the benefitz of these annual events seems to me to
be the maintaining of a local interest and partici-
pation in choral music of the finest type. In this
respect one finds such a festival to be a stimulus to
musical culture, not merely for a week, but
throughout the entire year.

Arnoa St

Treatments
For Oily and Dry
Hair

T 7

"II

I
a

It assists nature and will
Jarir]t h e-a h of nair

I

A .

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