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March 30, 1928 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-03-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FRIDAY, MARCH 30, 1928
H0MPLETEfA ANOUNCMENMT OF FINAL PLnANS
FOR ANNUAL UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION
NO AVAILABLE, A R TO DEAN KRAUS

THE MICHICAN DAILY _

CONSTRUCTION WORK PROGRESSING
IN SCENE OF CALIFORNIA DISAST E R

UNIVERSITY, PROGRAM,
TO GO ON AIR TONIGHT1

Tr'aviata," by Verdi.
The program, which is the thir-
teenth Michigan Night radio program
of the 1927-28 series, will be broad-
cast over station WWJ, by means of
direct wire connections with the cam-
pus studio on the fourth floor of Uni-
versity hall.
A leriod of three weeks will inter-

vene between tonight's program ax
the fourteenth Michigan Night radi,
cast owing to the spring vacation r
cess, Mr. Abbot announced yesterda
The next radiocast will take place c
Friday night, April 20.

CAT1AtOGTE
SPECIAL

CONTAINS LIST
LECTURES AND
TOURS

OF Registration will open from June 22
to 25, while the lawyers will register
on .June 15 and 16, and registration

SESSION OPENS JUNE 25
Faculty To Include Many Prominent
Men Frot Other Colleges
And Universities'

The' final and complete announce-
ment for 'the Summei- Session of 1928
Is now available at the office of the
Session in University hall, and will be
obtainable at the offices of the larger
'schools and colleges late this after-
1noon, according to Prof. Edward II.
Kraus, dean of the Summer Session.
This edition which has just come from
the brinters carries the usual an-
nouncements regarding rules and
regulations of the University, the list
of the regular and visiting faculty
members, the schedule of the special
tours and lectures, and the complete
informAitions regarding courses, hours
credit, and instructors for the Ses-
Sion.
The faculty of the Summer Session
will number more than 350 persons.
At present there are, on the roll of
the regular members, 80 professors,
44 associate professors, 73 assistant
professors, 79 instructors, and 13 as-
sistants, with a few more to be add,
ed in special work. There will be at
least 46 non-resident members of the
faculty, and among these will be some
of the best men in their especial fields,
according to Dean Kraus. Eleven
persons are included on the list of
those in the University high school
faculty.,
aions Men Will Come
One of the most famous men in his
field and in science will be Prof. H.
A. Kramers, of the physics depart-
nment at Rijks university in Utrecht,
Holland. Professor Kramers will
give a course on recent developments
in the quantum theory Prof. Walter R.
Agard, professor of classics at the
University of Wisconsin, Mabel C.
Bragg, assistant I sup.erintendent of
schools at Newton, Massachusetts, and
an outstanding woman in the field of
education, Dean George R. Carroth-
ers of the famous Rollins college at
Winter Park, Florida, Dean Wilford
Coffey of Detroit City college, are
some of the visiting people who will
give one or more courses for the
Session. Robert W. Hegner, profes-
sor at Johns Hopkins, an outstanding
man, will give courses in zoology.
Prof. Thomas Marc Parrott, profes-
sor of English at Princeton universi-
ty, will give a course in Victorian
literature; Prof. Herbert I. Priestley,
professor of Mexican history at the
University ot California, will give
courses in both Mexican history and
American diplomacy; and Prof.
James F. A. Pyre, of the University
of Wisconsin, will give courses in
English. Among. the more prominent
school men will be Maurice R. Key-
worth, superintendent of schools at
Hamtramck, Paul T. Rankin, assis-
tant director of Research^ for the
Board of Education in Detroit, and
Milo I. Stuart, principal of the Ar-
senal technical high school at Indian-
' apolis.
Session Opens June 25
The Session for the next summer
will begin on June 25 in all colleges
apd schools except the Law school
and in the field station in Kentucky,
which open on June 19. Session ends
in most of thb' schools, including the
larger ones, on August 17, although
,the law school does not close until
August 30. Little change has been
made in fees, but the new catalogue
specifies clearly the automobile regu-
lations for the summer. Regulations
in force during the regular year will
apply to the students in attendance
in Ann Arbor and to those at Camp
Davis, the Biological station and the
field camp for geology and geography.
Two exceptions are to be made, how-
ever, outside of those whom the Deans
waive: first, those persons "who in
the academic year are occupied in
professional pursuits, as foi example,
teachers, lawyers, physicians, den-
tists, and nurses." Second, those at-
tending the Public Health institutes.
,.......................................... .............

for the camps will be open before the
' regular session (closes.
The men "in"charge of the Session
have alreaudy planned a very complete
list of special tours, and lectures uipon
many diversified subjects. The Rock-
ford players will give their reper-
toire of plays for a six weeks run
throughout the first part of the Ses-
slop. Seven excursions, includIing
ones to the Ford factories Put-In-
Bay, Michigan state prison at Jack-
son, several' Detroit industrials, and
to Niagara Fails, will be made for
those who want to go. The expenses
for these tours which take the ex-
cursionists out of town will be cal-
culated on the bare running expenses
and will not be run for profit, it is an-
nounced.
HUNTING FOSSILS
TREATED IN TALK
An illustrated talk on fossil hunting
in Argentina was given by C. H. Riggs,
a former member of the staff at the
Field museum in Chicago, who was
one of the meibers sent to South
America by the museum to look for
fossils, at a meeting of Sigma Gamma
Epsilon Wednesday night.
The expedition sailed in 1921 and
touched at Rio de Janeiro and Buenas
Aires before stopping at Porto-De's-
eado in Argentina, where the party
landed and went inland. Riggs gave;
an account of the trip up to the time'
that itho expediti'on reachted IPorto
Deseado. He then described condi-
tions to be found on the pampas and
the various rock formations the party
encountered.
They found two leg bones of din-
osaurs, the most massive known,
which were secured by the expedi-
tion. They also 'secured a whale
skull which had been dropped in one
of the rock formations thousands of
years ago.
MASSACHUSETTS TECH.---By a
unanimous decision of the Senior en-
dowment committee, a plan whereby
the institute becomes part beneficiary
of life insurance policies taken out
by members of the senior class wa's
recently adopted.
CORNELL UNIVERSITY. - Pic-
tures of the campus as it may appear
50 years from now were shown here
recently.

Four Faculty Addresses And Several
Student Musical Numbers To
Be Broadcast
G00DRICH WILL GIVE TALK
(Continued from Page One)
Professor Hunt will trace the disin-
tegration of stone materials used in
Sfamous buildings and monuments and
will bring his address to a close with
a brief discussion of stone as a build-
ing material, mentioning some well-
known historical examples.
Charles Sylvester, '28P, and Lewis
Sylvester, '28P, will render a number
of harmonica duets on the musical
side of the program. They have made
numerous appearances before sever-
al state oganizations, according to Mr.
Abbot, and will include in their re-
pertoire tonight, "The Victors," "Blue
Heaven," "Moonlight, and Roses,"
"Yellow and Blue," "Home Sweet
Home,' and "Ohio Wesleyan."
Stewart Churchill, Spec., will ren-
der a solo, "Because," by d'Hardelot,
and Helen M. Gould, '30, will Tender
two solos, "Carmen Waltz Song," by
Wilson, and "Pale Moon," by Law-
rence. Miss Gould and Churchill will
also sing a duet, "Parigio," from "La

i hoipc 650

'39 S. Main St.

Buy Your Smoked
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the Price is Right
WHOLE OR
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VOGEL BROS.
MARKET

The Training School
for
Jewish Social Work
Offers a fifteen months course of
graduate study in Jewish Family
Case Work, Child Care, Com-
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Health Centers.
Several scholarships and fellow-
ships ranging from $250 to $1500
are available for especially quali-
fied students.
The next School Year Begins
July 9, 192
The Training School for
Jewish Social Work
210 W. 91st St., New York City

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Auspices Ann Arbor Theatre League
Hill Auditorium
PRICES: $1.00, -%ith a few at $1.50 and $2.00
Rear Rows Balcony, 75c
Seat Sale This Week : : Wahr's Book Store

Survivors of.the Santa Clara valley, Calif.,
about the work of reconstruction rapidly,
Tractors, scrapers and derrick's are all being
ing bridges and clearing away mud.

dam disaster have been setting
as the above picture shows.
utilized in the work of repair-

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April 21, 1927
Larus & Bro. Co.,
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Next to me in the smoking car a
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We then congratulated each other
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Sincerely yours,
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Senior Caps
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T

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Thompson's

"Ann Arbor's Original Sandwich and Coffee Shop"

148 lS.' O. UIVERSIT1.Y

Opposite Engineering Arch

-South U

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"The Home of

Hart Schaffner and Marx"

In Your Hurry

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Week Beginning Sun., Mar. 25
A ight ............75c to $2.50
11edL and Sact. Mats.. 75co to $1.Z0
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