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March 29, 1928 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1928-03-29

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY TAuRsDK

ECH 29, 19:

Ili-gun Datill]

Published every morning except Monday
during the University yearby sth eBoard in
Control of Student Publications.
Membernof Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches creditedrto it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail,
$4.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Buildiag, May-
sard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
JO H. CHAMBERLIN
Editor.......................Ellis B. Merry
Editor Michigan Weekly..Charles E. Behymer
Staff Editor............C.Philip C. Brooks
City LFAtoi ...... . ...Curtland C. Smith
Women's Editor...........Marian L. Welles
Sports Editor.............Herbert E. Vedder
Theater Books and Music.Vincent C. Wall, Jr.
Assistant City Editor.... Richard C. Kurvink
Night Editors
Robert E. Finch e. Thomas McKean
T. Stewart ]-ooker Kenneth G. Patrick
Paul J. Kern Nelon J. Smith, Jr.
Milton Kirshbaum
Reporters
Esther Anderson Sally Knox
Margaret Arthur Tnhn H. Maloney
Alex A. Boehnowski Marion McDonald
cean Campbell Charles S. Monroe
resie Churrbh-,avinPr ('
Blanchard W. Cleland Harold L. Passman
;4 L. , "- rla VY. '2Ulia
vlargaret Gross Rita Rosenthal
Valborg Egeland Pierce Rosenberg
Marjorie Follmer Eleanor Scribner
;ames B. Freeman Corinne Schwarz
Robert J. Gessner Robert G." Silbar
Taine GE.Gruber Howard F. Simon
lice Hagelshaw' George E. Simons ,
foseph PE. Howell Rowena Stillman
J. Wallace Hushen Sytvia Stone
Charles R. Kaufman George Tilley
William F. Kerby Bert. K. Tritschellfer
Lawrence R. Klein Edward L. Wsrner, Jr.
Donald J. Kline Benjamin S. Washer
'ack L. Lait, Jr. Joseph Zwerdling
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
WILLIAM C. PUSCH
Assistant Manager.. .George H. Annable, jr.
Advertising...........Richard A, Meyu.
kdvertising.............Edward L. Hulse
Advertising...........John W. Ruswinckel
Accounts.......... ...Raymond Wachter
Circulation,..G. . eorge B. Ahn, Jr.
Publication. ........Harvey Talcott
Assistants

George Bradley
Marie Brummeler
Tames Carpenter
Charles K.. Correll
Barbara Cromellr
Mary Dively
Bessie V. Egeland
Una Felker,
Katherine Frohn
Douglass Fuller
Beatrice Greenberg
Helen Gross
r. . Hammer
Carl W. Hammer

Ray Hofelich
Hal A. Jaehn
lames Jordan
Varion Kerr
Thales N. Lenington
Catherine McKinven
Dorothy Lyons
Alex K. Scherer
George Spater
Ruth Tbompson
Herbert E. Varnum
Lawrence Walkley
Hannah Wallen

THURS'DAY, MARCH 29, 1928
Night Editor-NELSON J. SMITH, JR.
THE DREAM REALIZED
This afternoon at 4:15 o'clock the
coraerstone for the new tWomen's
League building will be laid with a
simple ceremony. The -occasion will
mark, to a very large extent, the
realization of a dream of Michigan
women for nearly 40 years, as well
as the completion of one of the most
zealous and energetic campaigns ever
carried on at the University.
The present generation of Michi-
gan women, and generations to come,
will reap the benefits of the great
new-building which is to be the home
of the league. To their- predecessors.
however, who worked for years with-
out even a hope of immediate achieve-.
ment, belongs a large share of the
credit for the achievement; and it is
the spirit of both the past and the
present, as well as the future, which,
will be built into the cornerstone of
the new edifice this afternoon-- a
spirit which displayed not only a'
clear vision of its problem but an
inspiring energy in reaching its goal,
and in making its dream become a
reality.
ON THE GRID
Amid the sustained and sometimes
painful academic dignity of an in-
stitution of higher education, with its,
eminently proper decorum, its pre-
cise requirements, and its many fac-
ulty members who seldom descend to
the level of human beings, it is ex-,
tremely welcome to have, once a year,
an opportunity to remove the reins
from all of the suppressed enthus-
iasm, which exists underneath, and to
spend one evening in "roasting" both
high and low-at the Gridiron ban-
quet.
Founded five years ago for just this
purpose. the annual spring banquet
staged by Sigma Delta Chi has stead-
ily expanded, until the affair to be
staged next week promises to be)
the most extensive of its kind ever'
undertaken here. State and national
dignitaries have been to a large meas-
ure disregarded in the invitation list,
and the result will be closer em-
plasis on local personages, and local
events than has been accomplished
since the banquet was started as an
annual affair.
The setting of a national political
party convention promises much, and
it is troiinthat educationnial ignity

that dare not be publicly arraigned
is an opportunity both enticing and
delectable - an opportunity afforded
only by the annual Gridiron ban-
quet.
What with the lawyers being ac-
cused of stealing the "small" exhibi-
tion slide from the engineers, it
would seem that nothing on the cam-~
pus is safe. Probably Harry Tillot-
son got the rule to figure the seating
capacity of'the stadium for next year.
Now that the Junior Girls' Play is
over some of the boys are looking
for an opening to develop the neglect-
ed talent that has been consorting
with them in their classes for the
whole year without their tumbling.
Query to the B and G boys: Will
the grass be any greener this year?
CAMPUS OPINION
Annonynous communications will be
disregarded. Te names of comnuni-
cants will, however, be regarded as
confidential upon request. Letters pub-
lished should not be construed as ex-
pressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily.
LITERARY COLLEGE ACTION
To the editor:
It is again stated in The Daily of
Tuesday that the Literary faculty re-
jected the project of a University
College "because it felt that the Uni-
versity could not afford the addition-
al unit." This is only one of the
many misstatements of fact which
have appeared in various papers.
There is need of clarifying the issue,
not because it is obscure but because
iteration of misleading statements has
befogged the situation.
As a matter of fact, the cost of the
proposed University College was one
only of several considerations which
led up to the vote of disapproval by
the Literary college, as is. clearly
shown by the debate which extended
over four meetings before final action
was taken.
The vote upon the resolution was.
first withheld from the public with
the statement that it was "very close."
When objection was made, the vote
was given out as 74 to 71. As a
matter of fact the vote of disapproval
as an expression of the will of the
Literary faculty stood on the final
vote 103 to 83, which is by no means
a close vote, particularly since it was
to maintain the status quo. Although
instructors having three years of ser-
vice have now for the last seven years
by action of the Literary faculty been
allowed to vote on all question, it was
discovered shortly before the final
meeting cthat this rule was seeming-
lin conflict witha by-law of the
Board of Regents, and as a precau-
tion their vote was taken separately
from that of the men of Senate rank.
The three-year insructors voted
against the University College 21 to
12, the men of Senate rank 82 to 71,
total 103 to 83. On the same question
the Colleges of Engineering and
Architecture voted 66 to 25.
It has been repeatedly given out
that practically all other colleges and
schools of the University with the
exception of the College of Engineer-
ing and Architecture have by action
approved the plan of the Senate Com-
mittee of 65 on the project for a
University College. My understand-
ing is that the College of Law has.
taken no action of approval, and that
the Senate Committee itself has not
approved the project. Certain other
schools, such. asi that of Business Ad-

ministration, said to have unanimously,
approved the project, could not appl3
it, since its provisions relate to stu-
dents of the first two years and their
work begins with the junior year.
Their action of approval therefore
recalls to mind Artemus Ward's ap-
proval that his wife's relations should
be sent to the War. There are other
schools of purely professional charac-
ter which could not make use of the
plan since state laws largely pre-
scribe their curricula.
It ought to be known that as long
ago as December, 1926, the faculties
of the Colleges of Literature, Science,.
and the Arts and of Engineering and
Arcihitecture, both by decisive votes.
rejected the project of a University
College. The subsequent disscussion
in committees prolonged through gilt
a year and a half has served, there-
fore, to reaffirm earlier action.
So far as the Literary faculty is
concerned, the idea of a separation
of its college work so as to have
separate junior and senior college
units has been more than once con-
sidered, but as yet neither approved
nor rejected. On December 6, 1926,
a resolution was adopted which pro-
vided for raising a committee of the
College.to consider te subject. Three
days later the matter was taken out
of their hands and they were com-

j OASED RLS~
FRESHMEN
"DISPJENSE"1
WITH FAVORS o
"The report that the dispensati6n
of favors for the Frosh Frolic will
take place this afternoon is true,"
confessed Dirty ;Deal, chairman of
the affair, after a gruelling cross-ex-
amination conducted by attorneys for
the Rolls Investigating Bureau.
* * *
This 'idea of "dispensing" with
favors is no novelty on this campus;
they've been doing it at the Hop for
the last twenty years.
.* * *
The Rolls Disciplinary committee
has decreed that pots may be "dis-
pensed" with because it would be a'
shame to spoil the unblemished re-
cord which the Freshmen hold for not
having worn their pots yet this year.
Since a star of the Junior Girls''
Play has condescended to enliven the
Frolic by assisting Deal in leading
the grand march, he has been spend-
ing numberless hours in strenuous
practice for the event.
Above is an exclusive Rolls photo.
of the Frolic leader in action during
one of his hectic practice sessions.
In spite of these efforts, it is ex-
pected that his partner will make the
march a success after all.
* * *
At last a practical use has been
discovered for art' students. Two of
them, admits Sam Nibble, publicity
chairman for the atrocity to be spon-
sored by the class of 1931, are to
blame for the decorations.
* * *
The decorative features for the
event are to be in keeping with the
"silver" slave bracelets, which are the
favors to be "dispensed" with, but
the details of the plot are being kept
a secret.
We don't blame them. Anything
that will really decorate the Union
ballroom should be kept a secret.
- * * *

THEATER.
BOOKS
musiC
TON IGIIT: The Rockford Play-
ers present "The Barker" in the
Whitney theater at 8 o'clock.
TONIGHT: The Mimes present
Bernard Shaw's "The Devil's Dis-
ciple" in their theater at 8:15
o'clock.
S* x**
FACULTY CONCERT
Student orchestras necessarily are
a musical puzzle, what with the con-
stantly shifting personnel, and the
uncertain factor of youthful artistry.
-peavtu ueaq s'g 'eaAaot an S1
ly successful for the University Sym-
phony and the programs have been of
a uniformly high standard.
The last concert of the series nat-
urally presents some interesting prob-
lems in orchestra conducting, while
the program is one of the most im-
pressive yet attempted. The chief
number is, of course, the B flat Piano
Concerto by Brahms which Mr. Albert
Lockwood will play with the assis-
tance, in the third movement where
there is a cello solo, of Mr. Hans
Pick. This work of Brahms is an ex-
traordinary conception, wholly sym-
phonic, in which the piano is treated
largely as an obbligato instrument,
and requires of Mr. Lockwood almost
three-quarters of an hour of steady
playing.
In contrast to this rather heavy,
and certainly serious minded, fare,
Mrs. Freeman will play one of the
most brilliant pieces in violin litera-
ture, Hubay's "Azt Mondjak." This
is the eighth of Hubay's Czarda pic-
tures and is built on Hungarian folk-
tunes of which the technical and tonal
demands are very severe. The re
maider of the program, following, is
as brilliantly colorful and demanding
as the numbers already outlined.
Moszkovski; Spanish Dance, D
major.
Hubay; "Azt Mondjak" by Mrs.
Freeman.
Mozart; "Ave Verum," a motet
played by the strings.
Brahms; Concerto, Op. 83 by Mr.
Lockwood.
"PRESIDENTIAL YEARS: 1787-
IS60": A Social History by Meade
Miunigerode. G. P. Putnam's Sonis.
New York, 1928.. $3.40.
(Courtesy of the Print and Book Shop)
* *
Great men tremble at the touch
of Mr. Minnigerode's iconoclastic
typewriter, the sere laurels fall from
the idols increasingly fast as his rol-
licking revelations knock the pedes-
tals from under them. Who cares if
the campus did go overwhelmingly
Hoover? Fifty years from now some
biographer will show the whole thing
was due to the machinations of the
Hoover-for-President club, who in
turn were bribed by the promise of
the postmastership of Ann Arbor. It;
makes history so much more. exciting.
But Minnigerode is no mere ama-
teur seeking fame from startling
statements. When he depicts Hamil-
ton as the founder of political chican-
ery in this United States, he presents
heavy documentary evidence, 'vhen
.Jefferson is described as "a brilliant

demagogue, an ingratiating, double-
dealing idealist" enough of the gen-
tlemn's letters and opinions are, pre-
sented to fully convince anyone. In
fact, this abnormal documentation
makes the book a bit dull. Miniger-!
ode treads dangerous ground and
seeks to absolve himself, in some de-
gree, by voluminous quotations. And
with all respect to the men who made
our nation, their prose was not of
the type with which to while away
the idle hours.
Only the noisier election years are
discussed, but the trend of political
rise and fall is clearly discernible. It
is a somewhat shameful trend at that;
a tale of bribery, corruption, party'
acrobatics, mud-slinging, personal
and party asininity.
--L'Enfant Terrible.
* * *
SORORITY RECITAL
Sigma Alpha Iota, national musical
sorority, is presenting a student re-
cital in the School of Music auditori-
un, Thursday, March 29, at 8 o'clock.
The program;
Andante, from Sonata Op. 13, Bee-
thoven.
Warum, Schumann.
Aiabesque, E major, Debussy. j
Minuet de Martini.
Two bergerettes.
a-Jeune Fillette.
b-Maman Ditemoi.
Preludes Op. 11, No. 8, 1, 5, 23, 18,

si ilt l lt l- i 1D 1 111E 1 1i 0 11 t ll t

_, : A

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CONFERENCE

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Retailing is an attractive field fcr college graduates.
SExperience in department sitoresis linked with instruction.
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of one year of graduate work.
I Illustrated booklet on request. For further information write
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Ten seconds is the average
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LOWERS
Easter Plants
On Display-Order Early
SPECIAL THIS WEEK
Daffodils and Tulips at $1.50 per doz.
Phone 7014

The above picture is a view of the
two interior decorators in a more in-
timate pose.
* * * r
Ted Weems and his Kansas City
Cat-birds started bumming their way
in from the great open spaces pf
Missouri about three weeks ago. They
expect to arrive in time for the Fresh-
men's coming out party, providing
they get all the breaks and avoid
the "Brakies."
This is another "Victor Recording
Orchestra." We had one of their
records, but broke it-on purpose!
TED ON HIS
BAND-WAGON
* * *
1m.
Roll's own newsreel service (The
Lies of the World) was on the job
to catch a glimpse of Ted and the
boys, just as they pulled out of Chi-
cago, enroute to their much-heralded
"eastern" trip, via Ann Arbor.
* * *
I "We certainly thank the Jun-
ior Girls''Play cast for the sup-
I port they are giving us in mak-
ing our Frolic a success," grate- I
I fully remarked the Frenzied
j Freshman yesterday. "They are, 1
I among other things, making it
I possible for all the committee
members to make dates for the
I occasion."
* * *
I ROLLS RADIOGRAM
KALAMAZOO, MICH., 12:57, TODAY.
WE STILL HAVE HOPES OF BE-
ING AT YOUR PARTY, UNLESS THE
SNOWSTORM INTERFERES. SEND
DOG-SLED FOR- PIANO.,
TED WEEMS
* * *
"Trvm.n n~ wi+h fhosv marhnotx I

Store
Nickels Arcade.

Greenhouses
1400 Traver

"Flowers by Wire"

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TELEIPHO-NE CO.
Long Distance Rates are Surprisingly Low
... For Instance

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Or Less, After 8:30 P. M.

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Rates to other points are proportionately low.
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The rates quoted above are Station-to-Station night rates, effective from 8:30 p. m. to 4:M4 a. m.
A Station-to-Station call is one that is made to a certain telephone, rather than to some person in
particular.,
If you do not know the number of the distant telephone, give the operator the name and address and
specify that you will talk with "anyone" who answers at the called telephone.
Day rates, 4:30 a. m. to 7 p. m., and evening rates, 7 p. m. to 8:30 p. m., are higher than night rates.
A Person-to-Person call, because more work is involved, costs more than a Station-to-Station call.
The rate on a Person-to-Person call is the same at all hours.

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