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March 25, 1928 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-03-25

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SUNDAY, MARCHT 25, 1928

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

COUNT KEYSERUING IS' IS FIRST SPEAKER
SCHEDULED FOR TALKI
AT HILL AUDITORIUM

FA3IOI'S (GER1MAN 1PHI1LOSOPER
WILL BlE BROUG(HT iIIE
BY VOMIITT EE
IS NOW TOURING COUNTRY
Expedlil4) r 1911 Fu~rnished 11Tian
Witil iaterial for "Travel Mary
Of A Piilospher"
Count Hermann Keyserling, fore-
most German philosopher and athor
of "The Travel Diary of a Philoso-
pher," "The Book of Marriage," ad
"The World in the Making" is to
speak on April 19 in Hill auditori-
um, according to 'an announlcemen~t
by the special student- faculty com-
mittee that has taken charge of the
arrangemens for bringing Count;
Keyserling here. His sujet hasI
not yet been announced by the cor-1
mittee.
Count Keyserling is at present on
a. lecture tour of the United States,
this being his secondl visit to this
country. In his tour thus far he has
attracted attention from the press,
scholars, and society, and has addres-
sed packed houses in the largest
cities of the East. His first tour, in
1911, furnished him with material
for the closing chapters of his fam-
ons "Travel Diary of a Philosopher"
in which he deals wth America adt
Americans.
Was Bosheik Vicim'
Count Keyserling is of Gernman-~
Bal tic descent, his famnily having
held estates in Russian Livonia forI
many centuries under the Czars. Fol-
owing; the evolution his property
was confiscated by the Bolsheviks.
HeI went to Gernmany, where the pub-
lication of his diary, in 1918, brought
him sudden and universal fame. Hie
settled in Darmstadt where he mar-
ried Princess Bismarck, daughter of
the famous "Iron Chancellor."
The ancestors ,of' Count Keyser-
ling have for centuries been con-
cerned in" the intellectual, political
andl spiritual developments of their
era. His paternal grandfather, Alex-
ander Keyserling, was the founder of
Russian geology, councillor to Czar
Alexander 11, andl leader o tlls
Liberal wing of the sthonian feud-
al nobility. Another of his ances-
tors, Caesarian Keyserling, was an
intimate of Voltaire and Frederick
the Great, and to 'yet another Se-;
bastian Bach dedicated one of his
most beautiful compositions. Im-
manuel Kant, .the father of modern
philosophy, was for many years al
CONRAD'S LATEST
RHylETORIC VO LUME
15 WIDELY USED
Announcement has just been made
b~y the Hloughton M~ifflin Company,
publishers, that the book entitled
"Descriptive and Narrative Writing"1
by Lawrence H. Conrad, o the1
rhetoric department, has been adopt-
ed and is now being used as a text
in about twenty important colleges
and universities, distributed from
Maine to California. Among them
are the Universities of Michigan,
Kansas, M~aine, Illinois, Minnesota,
and New York university, and such
colleges as Wellesley, Oregon Stae,
Earlham, and Olivet. This is even
more remarkable because of the fac
that the hook was not published until
somuo liitle time after the institutions
opened last fall. Mr. Conra's other
books are "The Author's Mind," pub-
lished in 1925, and ''Temper," a
novel, published in 1924 andl again in
1928. This was the firs novel ever
written that dealt with giant Amer-
ican industry.

s1

RADIO STATION PLANS
THIRTEENTH MICHIGAN
NIGHT ENTERTAINMENT
WWJ TO BROAD)CAST' TALKS
BY FACULTY AM) MUSIC
OF FOUR STUD)ENTS
AB3BOT TO PRESIDE AGAIN
Slosson, Hunt, G~oodrichi, and La Rue
Will Have Great Variety Of
Subjects For Program
Four faculty addresses and a varied
musical program will comprise the
Thirteenth Michigan Night radio pro-
gram- to be broadcast Friday night
over station WWJ, the Detroit News,
according to Waldo M. Abbot, of the
rhetoric department, who is program
manager and announcer of the 1927-
28 series.
"Dictators" will be the subject f
the first address on the program to
be given by Prof. Preston W. Slos-
son, of the history department. Pro-!
fessor Slosson will deal with this
subject from a modern standpoint,
comparing present viewpoints with
those as recorded by history.
Prof. Walter F. Hunt, professor of
petrology, will be the second speaker
on the program, taking as his sub-
ject, "The Permanency of Stone."
Professor H-unt will mention tlbe his-
trclusages of this material, and
will conclude his address with a dis-
cussion of the value of stone as a
building materiaL.
"The Current Coal Situation" will
be the subject of, the third addr'ess by
Prof. Carter Goodrich, of the; econ-
omics department.

IEXHIBITS MOVED TO NEW MUSEUM
Moving of collections from Natural ; oom to be vacated by the moving.,
Science museum to the new Museum accor ding to the present plans. Doors
has been begun with the starting of ~prtn h w uem ilb
the packiing of exhibits. Cases in the{sprtnthtw rsem wilb
geology .museum are fast being emp-Ithnrown open to make one large room
tiedl, all except the historical geology for the gem'. and rock collections.
collections being prepared for theirTwo or three cases of historical
cartage to their new location. g eology collections will remain in the
The minerology nmuseum adjoining Natura~l Science building, while oth-
the historical and paleontology mu- er's will be moved to the new struc-
seum will branch out to include the Iturie.
The First Spiritual Church of Truth
:18 FAST J.EFFERSON STREET
2P. 31.--Lecture by R1ev. Laura Crawford, D)etro~it, followed by
scienitific rea.-dinigs by John Troop. Endnia. G. Adanis, Serena Russell .
,ind Deter Evanrs, Trustee of the 11ichigani State Spiritualist Asso-
c'iationl.
7::34 P. 31.Lecture by D)r. Julia l1. Walton, of Jackson, Trustee
of the )Iichigan State Sliritiiaihst Association, followed by scienl-
[Mei readings by 3i's. Tinary and John Troopi of Detroit, and others.
31rs. Loretta. Sclumidt, Secret-ary, wil also be presenit.

I.:

FOWLER'S
TEA ROOM
Breakfast-Luncheon-Dinner
OPEN SUNDAYS
Just try it-You'll like it
229 So. State Sma

all Gifts

I '

CLASSIFIED ADS PAY

Presiton W. Slosson
Prof. Preston Slosson, of the his-
tory' departmnent, who will deliver the
principal address on the thirteenth
Michigan radio night program. Pro-
fessor Slosson will speak on "Dicta-
tors."'
tutor in the home of another mem-
ber of the family.
It is from this rich background, and
ffrom a mnindl made fertile and flexible
b~y an erudition hardly to be equalled
in this present (lay that the famous
philosopher draws the material for
his observations andi reflection's. His
works have attracted the high est
Ipraise.

0

I Imp"ortant
INotice
Peronshaving gar-=
mentsinvolved in the
fire, please fill out and
return claim forms imn-
2 mediately. No adjust-
ments will be made until
- claims are in.
--
I-
Phoner
4213 220 So.State St.
2 -~~1 I 1 U I i l 1 1 1 1 U l l l l l l l il 1 1 1 t ~ l t I 1 1 1 l I ~ ~ l l I I I i U t 1 .

KODAKS DRUGS
- . _- -. A Between- f
k Class Drink
,Zb~O ~ That Bucks
rA/::U-W4 _ You Up for
Awn~rfl4 a Mental
i Sprint
VERNOR'S
"/ Ginger Ale
ii'MellowedE
QUESTION S 4 Years in
j 1 What is it? Oaken Casks
'~here is it?
I -~ 3. What was tihe Wnam of tie
K.~ . ihill where the first part of ANSERS
'the battle wats fought?
4. What general said at this1. Banker Ti~ll 3,ommi.
( -<~ batle,"Don't lire tll yon ed
s~ ee tile whites of ther meaBOt,~
_______ --- 5. W~hat famtous orator gave '3' Breed's huhl.
u1 speech at the luying Of 4Pet.
~ the cornersitone of this
---i o-unlent? i. Dmniel Webster.

III

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