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March 24, 1928 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-03-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

AY, MARCH 24, 1928 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

P.

ELVAVAM U ZMAAME

1,/A

FOR COMING PAGEANT

UICHIGAN WOMAN GRADUATE BECOMES Detroit Museum Has
KNOWN IN CHILD WELFARE MOVEMENTWhitby Hall, Famed
Colonial Homestead

_.

BARBOUR SCHOLAR WRITES OF CHINA'S
POLITICAL SITUATION; PRAISES CHIANG

I

Preparation For Traditional Event
Goes Forward Tnder Direction
Of Miss Ione Joh1son
WOMEN URGED TO ENTER
1 In order that the freshman wimen
may be prepared to tryout for the.
' Freshman Pageant, the dancing classes
which are being held for half an hour
a day will be continued every day in
the week from Monday through Fri-
cday until spring vacation. Three:
cla'sses have met this week, under the
direction of Miss lone Johnson of the
S physical education department.
The classes meet from 5 to 5:30
o'clock, the time being devoted to.
' practice and instruction in natural
P dancingi This plan of having prepa-
ratory classes met with such success
when it wa's used prior to the Junior
Girls' tryouts that it has been. adopted
as desirable for the pageant.
All first-year women who are inter-
ested in participating in their one
important class activity are urged to
attend the classes. The Freshman'
Pageant l's a tradition among the
women of the University. It is held
in connection with the Lantern Night
ceremonies in May, and offers a splen-
did, opportunity for freshmen to be-
come acquainted with each other, be-
sides giving them experience which
will be valuable when they come to
participate in that largest of women's
activities-the Junior Girls' Play.
Woman IsI Designer
Of New Theatre At
Stratford-On-Avon
Of seventy-two competitive archi-
tectural designs for the Shakespeare
Theatre at Stratford-on-Avon sub-
mitted during a recent cohte'st, the
one winning the prize was the work
of a woman.
Miss Elizabeth Scott, 29, although
having completed her studies only.
three years ago, drew the plan which
was selected from a group. submitted
by architects in Canada and America
as well as Great Britain. Mr. Ber-
nard Shaw, in commenting on it, says
that out of all the plans, it is the
only one that showed any "theatre
'sense."
The theatre is to be built on the
banks of the river and must therefore
be modeled to fit the lines .of the'
shores. The town character must be.
kept, and the general silhouette must.
be in keeping with the district and the
purpose of the theatre.

Miss Neva
Deardorif, 'JR,
who has won

national

recognition
in Social

----~~
An old colonial house, Whitby Hall,
is one of the most unusual exhibits in
Detroit's new museum. Whitby Hall,
originally built in Phi adelphia, stands
in the museum now, a wide clap-board
two-tory h'use with green shutters.
An cld fan-light door forms the en-
trance.
The builder of this house was Colo-
nel James Coultas, merchant, ship-
builder, farmer, .and mill-owner. Colo-
ne Coultas came to Philadelphia from
Yorkshire, Eng'end. He became a
prosperous and influential citizen,
phlanthropist, and patriot.
The windows and the shutters on
the house in the museum are the only
part of the original facade; which was
of brick. But the interior of the two
lower rooms, the fireplace, and the
stairway are just as they were when
the house was first built.
In the museum house are two room's
dcwnstairs and two bedrooms on the
second story. The rooms are furnish-
ed with museum pieces, the two four-
poster beds being of particular charm,
on being covered andl draped in a soft
old rose and white material, the other
hung in white lace.
The Institute of Arts is also show-
ing an interesting collection of an
early American silver, belonging to
Mr. and Mrs. Idsel Ford. In this col-
lection are four or five pieces of Paul
Revere.

Several we(
lished a letter
Dien D. L,, a
who is now
wrote at firs
melee thent
Miss Grace
women, has
Lo, who tells
the situation
Mrs. Lo ha:
cently, Mr. I
member of p
unexpectedly,'
to their hone3
November),
Nanking, whe
ernment was
culty. The h
Communists a
progress of c
Naticnalist le
moos vote the
meeting of tI
the Nationalis
assumed the
preparing for
ference and
Fcrtunately, t
ed a success.
ing over a ne
"The newI
purification o
tal principles
be replaced h
The desire ti
tween the difi
'ion is man
change of
'strative org
foreign polic3
declares that
to cooperate
which shows
the principle

eks ago The Daily pub- city with China.
received from Mrs. Wei- "My former professor, Frank W. Lee,
former Barbour scholar. was sent to the United States last
in Nanking, and who September as official representative
t hand of the political of the Nationalist government," Mrs-
taking place in China. Lo continues. "Professor Lee was
Richards, adviser to
again heard fromMrs. born and bred in America :and this is
in an interesting fashion his second selection as China's repre-
today. sentative. I believe his mission will
s been married cnly re- bring satisfaction to the people of
Lo being an influential the two most friendly republics of the
)olitical circles. "Quite West and the East.
she writes (referring "We have been quite busy during
ymoon the latter part of the present month," Mrs. Lo remarks.
we were called back to "The Conference has brought many'
re the natiomalist gov- Iguests. Some of their discussions
facing an internal dit- were held at our home. Last Sunday
norrible uprising of the we -were invited by the members of
t Canton struck hard the the Central Executive Committee to
cooperation between the join them in a trip to Tong-shun, a
eaders. With a un-ani- mountainSus ret ion about twentyJ
Whole nation urged the miles from Nanking. We spent the
he fourth conference of night at General Chiang's quarters
t party. General Chiang in the government villa. This fasci-
heavy responsibility of nating place is a bit like your Yellow-
the opening of the con- stone Park. Our new capital i's in
acting as -a mediator. I want of fine roads and big buildings,
he conference has prov- but it has its natural beauty and is
The leaders are turn- historically famous.
w leaf. "The frame work of Dr. Sun's tomb
platform emliasizes the --costing two million silver dollars-
f the party's fundamen- has been set up near the imperial
Agitation is going to tomb of the Ming dynasty. I hope
y constructive schemes. some day I will have the privilegef
o bring cooperation be- of showing you around this new capi-
ferent classes of the na- tal as we (lid last month in entertain-
ifested by the recent ing the representative of the 'World
the party's admin- Federation of Women for the Promo-
,anization. Concerning tion of Peace and Liberty.'
y the Nationalist Party "Mr. Lo is still dean of the Central
its government is ready Political Training. College. There
with any friendly nation are enrolled about three hundred stu-
its willingness to apply t dents, ten per cent women. -To meet
of equality and recipro- .the need of political tutelage as.

Service

m
m T(iT(TIT!'tt 'PiTfl' f[, i'!
I
i

Freshman Team Is
Chosen By Portians
For Annual Debate
In preparation for the inter-society
freshman debate between Portia and
Athena literary societies, tryout's were
held by Portia with the result that
the following were chosen as mem-
hers of the representing team: Flor-
ence Frandsen, '31, Margaret Laier,
'31, Frances Jennings, '31, and alter-
nate, Jane Robinson, '31.
SThe debate will he cn some lceal
subject and will take place Tuesday,
April 3. Ruth Banfield, '28, is acting
as chairman of the committee which
will choose the 'subject, to be au-
nounced later.
scheduled by the founder of the
Nationalist party. the training college
is, besides its original 'schedule, aid-
ing such. practical work as census
taking, cooperative policing and land
survey.
"General Chiang's return to office
as Commander-in-chief of the Nation-
alist forces gives new impetus to the
forces of the Northern expedition. He
is now near the front meeting Gone-
ral Fong. We are confident that the
unification of China will be achieved
in the neare'st future. General Chiang
is more than a military leader. Ho
wisely recognizes the need of infor-
mation and to that end has invited
two former professors of the Pekin;
National University and Mr. Lo to
form an advisory board."
Commenting on her personal work,
Mrs. Lo reports that until she as-
sumes a teaching position she is
writing for magazines and doing some
translation work.
TfPEWRITING ad
lINEOGRAPJING
a speelalty for
twenty years.
prompt Service, Experienced Oper
ators, Moderate Rates.
0. fD. MORRILL
17 Nickels Arcade. Phone 6615

Neva Deardcrff, a graduate of the
University - of Michigan in the class
of 1908, has become a nationally
known figure in the child welfare
movement. Her contributions and
accomplishments equal thaq of far
older people in the social field.
Miss Deardoff since graduation has
been associated with a number of
projects. The last one, however, has
brought her greatest prominence. She
is secretary of the State Children's
Commission. In this capacity she met
Secretary of Labor Davis -a short timef
ago, consulting with him in an effort
to improve the laws affecting the wel-
fare of the children in the 'state of
Pennsyivania.
Miss Deardoff obtained the degree of
Doctor of Philosophy from the Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania in 1911. Af-
ter that she engaged in research work
in both England and the United States,
becoming a member of the staff of
the Bureau of Municipal ,Research of
Philadelphia -in 1912. Until 1918 she.
remained there except during the time
she was chief of the Division of Vital

Statistics ih the Municipal Bureau of
Health' in the 'same city. Later she
served at the American Red Cross
headquarters in Washington 'until
1921. At this time she became con-
nected with the faculty at Bryn Mawr
college, . -as assistant professor of
Social Economy. She obtained her
last position in May, 1924, when she
accepted the work as executive 'secre-
tary of the Pennsylvania Children's'
commission.
While at Bryn Mawr Miss Deardoff
was associate editor of "The Survey,"
magazine, and this year is president
of the American Association of So-
cial workers, which represents in
social work what the American Medi-
cal Association is in medicine.
Miss Deardoff has written many
artic-les and pamphlets. She is presi-
dent of the Child Welfare League of
America, trustee of the Welliams
Foundation of Philadelphia, member
of the Executive Committee of the
Nation~al Conference of Social Work,
and of the Philadelphia Women's
Trade Union League.

i -
i
C
1
4
.

FANCY DRESS PARTY
The annual Fancy Dress Party
of the Women's league will he
giveneat 8 o'clock, March 31, in
Barbour gymnasium. Watch The
Daily for an important announce-
ment which will appear soon.

=WWI, I

ANGELL IS COMPLETING MEMORIAL
TO VICTIMS OF SCHOOL EXPLOSION

More than 200 Michigan State col-
lege women participated in the an-
nual demonstration given by the
Women's Education department Tues-
day, March 13. The demonstration
consisted of such things as clogging,
folk dancing, gymnasium stunts, and
fencing, besides a pin ball game be-
tween two picked teams.
MORGANTOWN, West Virginia--
Entering students at West Virginia
University are required to take a
psychological examination. The re-
suit has no bearing on their continued
residence at the university.
DELAWARE, Ohio-Members of
Theta Alpha Phi at Ohio Wesleyan
University this year are presenting
"Sun Up" as their annual production.
JUILLERET'S
302 S. State Dial 5860

SOPIOMORES WANTED!

All sophomore women who
would like to have a lot of fun,
and incidently, to play baseball,J
are asked to meet in Barbour
gymnasium Tuesday or Thursday
Iat 5 o'clock for practice.
CSI- DELTA PHI INITIATES
Chi Delta Phi. national honorary
literary sorority for women, held ini-
tiation Sunday, in the red room of
Martha Cook dormitory for the follow-
ing Women: Mary Louise Brown, '31,
Frances Jennings, '31, and Rita Rosen-
thal, '31. A short meeting was held
after the ceremony and the manu-
scripts of the initiates were read.

On the top floor of the new museum
is the studio of Carleton W. Angell,
University of Michigan sculptor. Mere,
in this studio, stands a statue whichG
has already attracted considerable at-
tention, although it is not yet com-
pleted. It is the figure of a happy1
little girl, lugging a kitten under one
arm, and is to be a memorial to the
two score children who lost their
lives in the Bath school explosion, i
last May.
As it now stands, in the midst of
the confusion of packing cases, cabi-
nets, and tables (for Mr. Angell is just
moving into his new studio) the statue'
is in soft-green plastercene. Even-
tually, however, it will be cast from
this plastercene model into bronze.
Beside this life-size statue, in the
studio, is a tiny five-inch model of the
little girl and kitten, which is the ori-
ginal sketch in clay, which Mr. Angell
used as a model in working on his
lifesize figure.
This memorial statue was made pos-
sible by pennies contributed by child-

ren of 111 public schools of Michigan.
The completed statue in bronze will
stand upon a stone pedestal in a buff
tile niche in the foyer of the new Bath
school opposite. the entrance. A
bronze plate on the front of the pedes-
tal will bear the following inscription:
"To the Children of Bath from the
Children of Michigan."
Mr. Angell has also recently de-
signed a plaque to honor the memory
of Professor Joseph Baker ,Davis, for
38 years a teacher in the College of
Engineering, and founder of Camp
Davis.
SCHOOL IN PARIS,
All.Expenses Including round
trip steamship fare for Two
Months
$750
Directed by Homer A. DesMarals
Arranged by M-Travel Club,
Grand Rapids, Michigan.

A1Symbol of Beauty
1.25~-$5.00
New exquisite pearls that have a lustrous,,soft creamy tint.
Sixty inches long, they may be worn in several different
ways, smartly twisted around the neck three times, or
with one end drawn through the loop of the other end to
give a choker effect at, the neckline. You can't resist se-
lecting these lovely new pearls with the price so modest!
Short Strand, $1.25 up
Pearl and Crystal Necklaces in 3-strand chokers and 18
and 60-inch lengths-$3.50.
Silver colored pearls to wear with gray costumes are
new-$3.50.
Chanel Necklace Set in silver-earrings to match-$3.50.
Red long and short necklace of beads with earrings to
match. Pendants and pins to match-$1.00 to $3.50.
s2 S. Ma iii Phone 4161
-i-

Try Our Fresh
Strawberry
Sundaes
Fresh Fruit Orangeade
With a
Delicious Toastwich
for a Pleasing Lunch.

N ~

II

I

IL14

C

Try this three-layer brick
of Ann . Arbor Dairy Ice
Cream, then you'll under-
stand why this ice cream, s
so popular!
VANILLA
LEMON CUSTARD
BURNT ALMOND

6.

b

The Rhythm of Color

Ethel'-

1 ' A

Contributes a Gala
Quality to Dress and

For the Love o' Pete

Go downc to the sea
~infrmal'.- mean ing
Cunard Torist Thir
---the way of the know
ing illuminati to
EUROPE
$193.50
gets you there and back
in Cunard Comfort . .
without severely punish-
ing the bankroll ?
Sailing 'Tourist Third" is
adventure that begins when
you go up the gangplank.
You will dance on mnoonlit
decks to therhythm of a col-
lege orchestra no feet have
yet resisted. You will swim
in salt water in an impro-
vised deck tank. You'll play
the delightful dIeck games
thatyouth-on-a-larkdevises.
And there'll be bridge,-
and conversation;- and
sometimes lost sleep! But
of course you have your
choice between missing
sleep and fun.
Do you realize how very
inexpensively this can be
done on big Cunard ships
such as the CARONIA, CAR-
MANIA, SCYTHIA, LACONIA,
LANCASTRIA and TUSCANIA?
You are berthed in a corm.
fortable, clean cabin, you
have good food, nicely
served, with ainple deck
space and you enjoy; the
company. of your own
kind of people.. because
they are others like you
who feel the adventurous
call of traveling Tourist
Third Cabin.
C T TIN Al D

l

I

I

Sports Hats

We can
get the

Shoes in.
S ,.- Ann Arbor

/

Puyear & Hintz

Michigan Theatre Bldg.

THE ANN ARBOR DAIRY CO.
Dil 4101

OPEN EVERY NIGHT UNTIL
EASTER

Ruth-For goodness sake, where?
Ethel-At Ziefle & Nissle's down town.
Ruth-It's the best fitting shoe any woman
ever wore. And such pretty patterns-
I'm going right down and get a pair.

4

1F'q

11'

.,

LASiT

Ethel-I'm with you.

CALL!

MEN

All special prices on our broken lots in FLORSHEIMS
and PACKARDS OXFORDS withdrawn Saturday night
at 9:30.

-

'11

11

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