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March 22, 1928 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1928-03-22

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MSABLISHED
1890,

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4aU1*

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

wwamlowmmmk*M

VOL. XXXVIII, NO. 131.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 1928

.

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HEL

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L I L

OPPOSITI O-

WORLD
EN6INEERS END
FOR EXHIBITION''

COURT

LOSES BY

BIG

1

PRESIDENT LITTLE, OTHER FACULTY
NOT ABLES, VOTE IN DAILY ELECTION

PLAN IAARGE PROGRAM
FEATURE EXHIBITS
AND DISPLAY$
SHOEMAKER IS CHAIR
Every Department To Take 1's
First Open House Progran
Since 191"

O I

IMAM
'rt Ini
to

Final arrangements for the Open
House of the College of Engieering
which will take place from 1 o'clock
in the afternoon to 9 o'clock in the
evening cn Friday, and from 8 o'clock
in the mrning to 5 o'clock in the
aftern on on Saturday, have been
practically completed.
The complete program for this Open
House, the first given by the College
of Engineering since 1915, has been
announced by Perry Shoemaker, '28
E, general chairman of the undertak-
ing. Many remarkable exhibits have
been arranged for dSplay to the public
during the course of the Open House,
some of them having been brought
here with considerable difficulty.
The departmnt of aeronautical en-
gineering will demonstrate the use of
the wind tunnel which'is located in
the basement of the East Engineering
building, and in addition will show ex-
amples of' desgn work and a number
of model planes.
To' have Chemical Show
The department of chemical engin-
eering, in addition to putting on a
chemical show demonstrating the
melting and pouring of metals, will
display various metallurgical exhibits,
and will show among other things the'
use or the Duco spray both, the ultra
violet ray weathering machine, the
ice n me, the process of nickle-
plating, ble crystalizer and cetrafuge
operation, and high temperature steel
testing.
The department of electrical engin-
eering will -open the dynamo labor-
atory and the illuminating laboratoryI
and will demonstrate x-ray experi-
ments, vacuum tube experiments, and
a machine that can draw as many as
160,000 lines per inch on glass or
highly polished metal, which is used
for measuring wave lengths in the
ether. Also, a reverberation room and
a sound proof room will be opened to
the public, as will the radio rooms.1
As a feature of the open house, the
department of civil engineering is of-;
fering a very large exhibit of models,
many of which will actually be oper-
ated. Incluided in the list are models
of road machinery, grade crossings,
bridges, a sewage disposal plant, a
filtration plant, a typical countryside,
12 feet by 14 feet, and a locomtive
and train models ranging from the
earliest American built locomotive, to
a scale model of the Twentieth Cen-
tury Limited Models of modern auto-
mobiles and a model of a Great Lakes
freighter valued at $15,000 will also
be exhibited.
Model Submarine To Be Shown
'The department of marine engineer-
ing will have working models in op-
eration in their naval tank, and will
show examples of 'ship, boiler, and en-
gine design, A model of a modern
'submarine will be exhibited and the
actual engine used in the launch of
Admiral Severa, who was the Spanish
Admiral at the time of the sinking of
the Maine, will be displayed.j
The department of mechanical en-
gineering will exhibit and test various
types of aircraft and automobile
motors, and will open the foundry,
forge, and machine shops. A high
speed turbine and a Doble water
wheel will be 'shown in operation, and
some heating and ventilating experi-
ments and mytery demonstrations
will be offered. The University power
plant will be open and the air brake
instruction car of the Michigan Cen-
tral lines will be on the University
siding from 8:30 o'clock in the morn-
ing to 4:30 o'clock in the afternoon on
Friday. .
The department of military science
and tactics will exhibit pieces of light
artillery throughout the Open House.
PAIL TESTIMONY

President Clarence Cook Little is sion of campus opinion, theI
here shown casting his vote at 4 arrived at the poll just at
o'clock yesterday afternoon, in the when the vote was heaviest,
poll held by The Daily. Joining with the his vote in the true political
rest of the faculty in hearty support , even shielding his ballot

Pre-sid'ent
the timeI
and cast
manner,
with his

of the movement toward an expres-

Will C;ndiict Affair Along lines
Nattioial PIolitical Convention
According To Committee

Of

ATTENDANCE IS LIMITED
Invitation, for the 'sixth annual
Grtdiron banquet, sponsored by Sigma
Delta Chi, professionsl journalistic
fraternity, were place in tle mails
late last nigh, according to the invi-
tati-n committee. Between 300 and
400 invitations were included in the
list, which included both students and
faculty members. This year's ban-
quet will be held on Wednesday night,
April 4.
Instructions for returning the invi-
tations were included in the letter,
and, ,according to the committee, they
should be returned to convention head-
quarters, as designated by the invita-
tions, by the end of this -week. In-
asmuch as it is planned to limit at-
tendance to the u'sual 300, the first ap-
plications will be assured of securing
tickets.
Outside invitations have all been'
placed in the mails, according to the
committeo ,and replies are being re-f
ceived d aily. Indications are that
many outside guests will be present
on the night of the annual "razzfest."
The price of ticket for this year's ban-{
quet has been set at $2.75.
As previously announced, the affair
will be conducted along the line of a
national political convention. Tickets
for the banquet have also been se-
lected to harmonize with this scheme,'
the ticket committee reported yester-
day, and they will be mailed out next
week, in order to accommodate recip-
ients as early as possible.
The different factions present on the
night of the banquet will be grouped
separately in order to give their candi-
dates moral and verbal support, ac-
cording to the seating committee. Por-
traits of the fathers of the different
parties are being painted and will, be
arrayed about the convention hall,
which, for other occasions is known
as the Union ball room.
The identity of the recipient of the
famous "Oil Can" still remains a mys-
tery, the choice not to be known until
the night of the banquet. It ha's been
intimated that the speeches given at
that time by the different candidates
will probably materially further the
cause of the recipient, as far as the
final choice is concerned.
Bridge Prizes To Be
A mnrr-,1 Tn Winn era

hand as he marked the small squares. 1
His vote remains a secret.
The faculty vote wa's especiallyE
large in yesterday's balloting, exceed-I
ing by a ┬░large majority the number
of votes cast by the faculty at any of9
the previous elections that have been
held for the campus at large. Much
of this was no doubt du'e to the talkt
-xcited by this year's campaign, andi
by the Coolidge ultimatum.r
RESHME[N AGREE[ TO~
KEEP POT TRADITION c
Further progress in the enforcement
of the tradition of the freshman pot1
was announced by Courtland C. Smith,
'28, at the regular weekly meeting of
the Student council held lat night at1
the Union. Smith reported to the
council that he has interviewed tie t
presidents cf the freshmen classes of1
the engineering college and of thet
College of Literature, Science, and the
Arts with the result that they will en-
deavor to take steps which will per-t
petuate the tradition.
The efforts are the result of thel
neglect by large portions of the fresh-t
man class to wear their pats thist
year.
Among the other business trans-
acted at the council imeeting lacl
night was the report of a committeet
which has conferred with the major
officers of the various classes of the
Medical school, with the result that
a more sincere effort will be made }
in the future to cooperate with the
medical classes in the handling of
their class elections and various class
functions, according to the report. In,
the past, due to the inconvenient
hour of laboratory periods and the
exceptional nature of the Medicalt
school organization these classets
have been forced to handle their own'
class elections and similar duties.
An effort will be made to assist them
in the future, the council decided.
Plans for Cap Night are proceed-
ing to completion, according to the
report of the Cap Night committee.
Cap Night this year will be held on
May 11. The site has not as yet been
decided upon.
DISSIPATE RUMOR
OF FOUND PLANE
(hy Associated i'res3.
GREENVILLE, Maine, March 21.-
The possibility that the monoplane
Endeavour in which Capt. Walter
Hinchliffe and the Hon. Elsie Mackay
set out from England last Tuesday
on a transatlantic flight. might have

VOTERS REJECT
ALL-PROPOSALS
WOMEN AND FACULTY FAVOR
WORLD COURT BY ONLY
SLIGHT 3MARGIN
MALE ,STUDENTS OPPOSE
Suggestion To Draft Coolidge Loses
By Ten To One Vote, But Issue
On Prohibition Is Close
Snowed under by a count of more
than three votes to two,theeissue of
the World Court, as presented on
the ballots of the presidential poll
conducted yesterday, fell in defeat
by a majority of more than 800 votes.
In the deluge of "no" ballots which
descended on the three questions,
both of the other issues, involving
prohibition and the. drafting of Cool-
idge, were also defeated, though the
prohibition ballot was close. The
proposal to draft Coolidge was over-
whelmed by more than ten votes to
one.
Both the women students and the
faculty members gave the World
Court a slight majority, the women
voting 202 to 168 in, favor of the pro-
position while the faculty gave it a
narrow six vote margin with 130 bal-
lots to 124. The male students, how-
ever, registered in decisive terms
their disapproval of American entry
in the international body, by a mar-
gin of well over 850 votes.
Prohibition Race Is Close
In the poll on prohibition, thoug
the question was not directly stated,
much the same thing happened, ex-
cept that the margin of disapproval
was not nearly as large as in the
case of the World Court. The fina
vote on this question, which found
2,012 of the voters against the pro-
position and 1,811 in favor of it, wa
the closest of the three issues pre
sented, and both the women student
and the faculty members gave the pro
hibition question a decisive margin
The faculty voted 250 in favor of th,
policy and 123 against it, and th
women students voted in a similai
vein with 171 votes in .favor of pro
hibition and 102tagainst it. In thi
case again, however, the margi
against the proposition registered b
the male students was insurmountabl
when they gave the question a hau
icap of nearly 400 votes, and the fina
result was the 200 vote defeat.
Coolidge Measure Downed
The proposition of drafting Presi
dent Coolidge as a candidate for th'
presidency went down to the most
decisive defeat of any of the three ques-
tions presented. All three factions of
faculty, male students, and women
students voted decisively against this
proposal, and the final outcome wa
a complete repudiation of the idea of
drafting the present President as
candidate. The faculty members vot
ed 262 to 15 against the proposition,
the women students defeated it by;
count of 330 to 46, and the mal
students, remaining consistent to their
policy of rolling up a decisive mar-
gin against each of the proposals
snowed it under by a vote of 2,90
votes to 279.
The question on drafting Preside-
Coolidge was, like the question o
the World Court, directly stated.
HOOVER HEADED
VOTING IN 1920
Herbert Hoover, secretary of com-
merce, is not a new favorite of the
University faculty and student body as

a presidential candidate, it is revealed
by examination ot the returns of a.
straw ballot conducted in 1920 by The
Daily. Secretary Hoover, in that year,
led nit only on the Republican ticket
but in the Democratic balloting a's
well, though his margin of victory in
both parties was very narrow.
Never before in the history of re-
corded campus ballotting has interest
reached the peak of yesterday, when
more than 4,450 votes were cast,
though the totals in 1920, when in-

"For the Love of Pete," the Junior
Girls' Play with its locale on a float-
ing university, and replete with
dances and tuneful melodies, contin-
ues its run at the Whitney Theater
for the remainder of the week, with
a matinee on Saturday.
The joint product of more than
125 girls of the Junior class, the
Junior Girls' Play is the largest sin-
gle venture given by any class in the
University. .Rivaling in size and mag-
nificence the Union Opera, all of the
work is done by members of the Jun-
ior class with the exception of paint-
ing and shifting of scenery. The ef-
fort to maintain the standards of the
productionaas strictly amateur have,
however, had nothing to do with the
excellent .brand of entertainment
which has been offered from year to
year.
The general chairman of the play
is Elizabeth Wellman, '29, the busi-
ness is in the hands of Marie Hart-
wig, '29, and Minna Miller, '27, is the
general director of the production.
I |I
APPRECIATION
To the student body which lent
Its enthusiastic support, to the
faculty members who cooperated
so heartily in casting their bal- I
lots, and to the various individ- I
uals and organizations who aided,
in the mechanical arrangement
and management of yesterday's
all-campus presidential poll, The
Daily expresses its sincere ap-
preciation. I

TABULATION 0
CAMPU

IA RGINALOS FOR PESI DN Fl
Junior Presentation REPUBLICAN ENTRANT AS SI
Has Successful Run
At Whitney Theater IS.DEFEATED BY DECISIVE

Is

SECRETARY OF COMMERCE RECEIV
MAJORITY OVER REMAINING
CANDIDATES IN RACE
Sweeping through the all-campus presidential poll held yes
(lay to pile up a decisive majority of all votes cast in bth part
Herbert Hoover, secretary of commerce, stood last night as
outstanding unofficial choice of the University student body
faculty for President of the United States. Secretary Hoover o'
whelmed his nearest competitor, Gov. Al Smith of New Yorks b
ratio of more than seven votes to two, and gained 2,540 of the t
of 4,451 votes cast.
Governor Smith, who led the Democratic candidates and v
was in second place in regard, to total votes, received 728 of
ballots cast, while Charles Evans Hughes, veteran New York sta
man, was second in the Republican ranks and third in point of vo
received with 303. Vice-president Charles Dawes received
votes; Newton D. Baker, 102; Frank Lowden, 95; Senator Will
Borah, 90; and Senator James Reed, 75; amonfg the other lead
candidates.
Among the 276 faculty members who cast votes in the st
ballot the various candidates showed only a slightly variant deg
of strength. Secretary Hoover was the outstanding choice of
group as of the others, with slightly 'more than half of all bal
cast, while Governor Smith was a .poor second with 56 vo
Newton D. Baker showed popularity all out of proportion to
measure in the all-campus tabulations, however, when he polled
or almost one tenth of the entire number cast. Another shift
strength fromn the.all-campus returns was noted in the.Republi
party when Senator Borah and Hughes tied for second place w
ten votes apiece, while Lowden was an extremely poor fifth w
only three votes.
A distinct departure from the average was noted in the wome
vote, however, when Secretary Hoover polled '423 of the tota
614 votes cast. Another decided shift of strength was apparen
the total of Governor Smith among the women voters when 1
candidate, who had gained about one of every six votes thro
the .whole ballot received scarcely more than one tenth, or 43, of
women's votes. Hughes was
far the outstanding second cho
F RETURNS OF among the women students, w
S POLL 'he received 41 votes, only'
less than Governor Smith, while V
B~iCAIVpresident Dawes, who failed to lc
BLICAN rasdanappreciable candidate in
e Women balloting as a whole, gained '24 v
its Students Faculty Total from the women.
S43 14,540 The vote as a whole, numbe
4 I 3503 more than 4,500 students and fac
47 I 303 members, was the largest all-can
24 7 1'2 ballot ever reported on any issue,
6 3 9: ing more than 350 votes more I
S 10 90 were cast in the 1920 straw ballo
19 2 67 was conducted by The Daily at
2 o 27 polling booths on the campus,,w:
2 , 15 w'ere kept open all day with
2 114 exception of one hour over noon,
o O 10 several organizations of a polil
nature aided in getting the stud
to to the polls in large numbers.
The straw ballot will be linked v
527 175 3,323 a natiot-wide poll of a similar
ture which is being conducted un
RATIC the auspices of a national maga:
the results of which will be announ
e Women about April 1.
its Students Faculty Total '

REPUE

Candidates S
Herbert Hoover........
Charles E. Hughes . ... .
Charles Dawes.........
Frank Lowden..........
William Borah. ......
Nicholas Longworth ...
Frank Willis.. ... ...
Nicholas M. Butler.....
George W. Norris......
Charles Curtis. ..... . .
All others..............

Mal
tudeni
1,976
252
121
86
72
46
25
1.2
1 1
10

Total.... . ..........2,611

DEMOC

Candidates <' S
Alfred Smith...........
Newton D. Baker.......
James Reed....... ..
Willam McAdoo........
Albert Ritchie..........
Thomas Walsh.........
Vic Donahey ............
All others ...........

Mal
tuden

P29
6O
67
55
57
41
17

43.
16
6
12
4
5
I

26
6
3
7
1

726
102
75
73
64
53
19
14
1,128
4,4.51

Total .... .........926
Grand Total.........

87

101

NATIONAL ISSUES POLL

I. Do you believe that commitment to a policy of
forcement for the 8th amendment is a desirable
Lihon for a President?

rigid en-
q"al f ica-

Jpposition To CI
Memorial Is Voi
Much opposition to the rec
adopted plan to provide a clasi
morial by mean's of a group en
ment irsurance policy, was voit
,a meeting of the senior class (
engineering college held Tui
night. The meeting was held
Imany members of the class cl
that too many were swept oft
feet by the enthusiasim shown a
meeting last Friday morning, an
-because? of this the vote was not
resentative of the views of the
The" plan which had been a
and raised much objection, cal
each member of the class upon
uation, taking out a $250 insu
policy payable at the end of 25
a single payment amounting t
proximately $8.75 per year. A
end of the 25th reunion of the
in 1953, a sum of about $110,000i
will have accumulated will be
where they believe the money car
be usedl for the interests of the
versity.
Because of the opposition t
plan now adopted, it was deeme
visable to have this revote in
that the class might act in accon
with the opinign of the amajori1
was decided that a committee 1

Yes
Male studnts... .. ......1,390
Women students..... .7.. .. 71
faculty ... ..................250
'Total.............I,81I

No
1,787
102
123
2,o0I2

2. Do you believe that commitment to entry by the United
States into the World Court is a desirable qualification for
a President?

Yes
Male Students ............... I,029
Women Students-.......-.- .202
Faculty....................130
Total ............... ....1,361

No
I,893
168
124
2,185

- -- --'.-. -". ..- -. I

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