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January 13, 1928 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1928-01-13

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, ,72kN ,;Its' I", 1X28

PAGE FOUR FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 1928

Published every morning except Monday
during the University yeartbysthe Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail,
$4.50.
Otices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
JO H. CHAMBERLIN
Editor............. .......Ellis D. Merry
Editor Michigan Weekly.. Charles E. Behymert
Stagf1;Editor ............:..Philip C. Brooks
City Editor........... Courtland C. Smith
Women's Editor...........Marian L. Welles
Sports Editor............Herbert E. Vedder
Theater, Books and Music.Vincent C. Wall, Jr.
Telegratph Editor.. .."........ Ross W. Ross
Aseitant'City Editor...Richard C. Kurvink
Night Editors
Robert E. Finch G. Thomas McKean
J. Stewart (looker Kenneth G. at: ick
Paul J. Kern Nelson J. Smith, Jr.
Milton Kirshbaym
Reporters
Esther Anderson Marion McDonald
Margaret Arthur Richard I. Milroy
Emmons A. Bonfield Charles S. Monroe
Jean Campbell Catherine Price
Yessie Church Harold L. Passman
Clarence N. Edelson Morris WV. Quinn
Margaret Gross Rita Rosenthal
Valborg Egeland Pierce Rosenberg
Marjorie Follmer Edward J. Ryan
Tames 13. Freeman David Scheyer
Robert J. Lessner Eleanor Scribner
I laine E. Gruber Corinne Schwarz
Alice Ilagelshaw Robert G. Silbar
Joseph E. Howell Howard F. Simon
J. Wallace Hushen Rowena Stillman
Charles R. Kaufman Sylvia Stone
William F. Kerby George Tilley
Lawrence R. Klein Edward L. Warner, Jr.
Donald J. Kline Benjamin S. Washer
Sally Knox Leo J. Yoedicke
Jack L. Lait, Jr. Joseph Zwerdling
John H. Maloney
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
WILLIAM C. PUSCH
Assistant Manager... George H. Annable, r.
Advertising.......... Richard A. Meyer
Advertising.............Artbur M. Hinkley
Advertising..............Edward L. Hulse
Advertising.............John W. Ruswinckel
Accounts..................Raymond Wachter
Circulation..............George B. Ahn, Jr.
Publication.................Harvey Talcott
Assistants

George Bradley
Marie Brumler
James 0. Brown
James Carpenter
James B. Cooper,
Charles K. Correll
Barbara Cromell
Mary Dively
Bessie V. Egeland
Ona Felker
Katherine Frohne
Douglass Fuller
Beatrice Greenberg
Helen Gross ;
E. J. hammer
Carl W. 1aminer
Ray Hiotelich

11jal A. Jaehn
Tames Jordan
Marion Kerr
Thales N. Lenington
Catherine McKinven
W. A. Mahalfy
Francis D. Patrick
George M. Perrett
Alex K. Scherer
Frank Schuler
George Spater
Wilbert Stephenson
Ruth Thompson
Herbert E. Varnum
Lawrence Walkley
Hannah WalIen

little real enthusiasm toward getting
the convention, in spite of the fact
that the sight of a Democrat would
be a real treat to most Detroiters.
Democracy has only the slightest of
chances to carry the state in Novem-
ber, and probably any compliment
such as the holding of the conven-
tion would not turn the tide away
from the 0. O. P.
San Francisco, on the other hand,
offers another peculiar problem. It
was California, it will be borne in
mind, which led the forces in favor
of its resident McAdoo in the 1924
convention. It was California which
battled to the bitter end against Al
Smith in that convention, and with-
out a doubt California will battle
again against the candidate of Tam-
many. If there is any lesson the
Democrats should have learned, more-
over, it is the lesson that to hold a
convention in a city rabidly prej-
udiced, as New York was prejudiced
in favor of Smith in 1924, is a danger-
ous procedure.
The final point that cannot be
neglected in connection with San
Francisco is the fact that Herbert
Hoover, leading Republican candidate,
is a Californian in many respects and
that it is quite improbable that any
Democrat could carry the state
against him. In short, it appears that
the city of the Golden Gate offers lit-
tle political advantage to the Demo-
crats even in the event that it is their
final choice for the convention.
On the whole it would seem that
Democracy is faced with a curious
dilemma. No other cities appear will-
ling to provide the necessary funds,
and if one of the two cities mentioned
is chosen the party loses almost en-
tirely the chance for political advan-
tage which the choice of a convention
city gives them. On the other hand,
if either of the cities mentioned is
:1losen finally, it will be extremely
interesting to watch the outcome
which the peculiar characteristics of
each affords.
Diogenes has at last found an hon-
est man.. In the will of a noted Cali-
fornia lawyer, recently deceased is
found provision for reimbursing
clients who lost by his advice.
CAMPUS OPINION
Annonymous communications will be
disregarded. The names of communi-
cants will, however, be regarded as
confidential upon request. Letters pub-
lished should not be construed as ex-
pressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily.
3ANNERS
To the Editor:
"What the University needs as much
!as anything is a course in diplomacy
and politeness," stated Prof. Waldo
Abbot in an interview published on
the Women's page, Tuesday, Jan. 5.
He was very tolerant in his criticism
of students as a whole admitting that
they were not all barbarians, but if
one is to get critical, it may be per-
missable to ask who will teach this
course?
Applying Mr. Abbot's tolerant prin-
ciples, not all professors are ill-man-
nered, but there are a great many
of them whose crudities, tactlessness
and even rudeness, which is perhaps
born by a sense of their ultimate su-
periority over their pupils, certainly
do not require respect and emulation.
Courtesy can be the foundation of
understanding and mutual benefit, but
sarcasm, ridicule and abrupt public
denunciation of not taking notes when
the reason is the lack of a full foun-

tain pen, do not make for this under-
standing and mutual benefit.
The continuous wail on the part of
some faculty members that students
in this country are "careless, ignorant
and bad-mannered" puts them entirely
out of reach, and frightens away pos-
sible confidences which should be per-
mnitted the serious student. Else why
have "international authorities" on
the faculty?
Last year there was a professor in
the Italian department, who fortunate-
ly did not return to the University
this year, who was everything that
can be implied by "bad-mannered,"
sneering, coarse, suggestive and rude.
There are others who are so ab-
sorbed in themselves that a mere stu-
dent is worthy of nothing but a raise
of the eyebrow or a curt reply.
A rational view of the situation
would be a "course in diplomacy and,
politeness" for everyone, meaning a!
revival of emphasis on the niceties
of conduct, rather than an indictmentj
of students or faculty. Perhaps we
sounded harsh when we said "Who
would teach the class?" because therej
I are certainly men who could.
The question arose from momen-
tary indignation aroused by a criti-
cism which applies to all of us. It!

ROLLS
BRINGS
HENDERSON
(Editor's note: Robbie Ilenderson,
famous actor around these parts when
Ypsl Normal was only a kindergarten,
has consented to return front Rocklord
with his gang and play in the Whiney
for two months. The inside story of
how Henderson was brought here has
never been told until released this
morning in Rolls.)
* * *
(BY SPECIAL ROLLS
CORRESPON DENT)
Henderson's Roquefort players
opened in a blaze of glory and things
early last fall in Rockford, Illinois.
Immediately the Rockford theater-
goers were anxious to schedule per-I
formances in other cities for the com-
pany.
* * *
..Shortly after this a member of Rolls'
executive board visited Rockford and
confronted Robbie over the telephone,
with the following Coversation:
* * *
"ROBBIE," said he, "THE HUMOR
SITUATION IS AT A LOW EBB ON
THE MICHIGAN CAMPUS, WE NEED
YOU."
* * *
Robbie replied thus:
* * *
"_ _" (It was a poor
connection on the phone.)
* * *
"NO," said the Rolls correspondent,
"THERE IS NO DANGER OF THAT;
NEARLY ALL OF THE MORE TEN-
DER EGGS HAVE HATCHED OR
EXPLODED IN THE LAST FEW
MONTHS IN ANN ARBOR--I'LL
SHOW YOU!"
* * *
At this point the RL, correspond.
ent took from his pocket a copy of the
Ann Arbor Poultry and Daily News
and showed Robbie the following over
the phone:
ALL DELICATE EGGS ARE
NOW HATCHED
IG
(Which can't be used on Robbie.)
* * *
Robbie replied,"
. * * *
"NO," said the Rolls correspondent,
"THERE IS NO DANGER OF THAT;
ALL OF THE CABBAGE AND'
TURNIPS IN THESE PARTS HAVE
BEEN THROWN AT HARVEY EM-
ERY."
* *
~~~~~~~-~ - - - , R obbie r eplied.
* * *
"HAVE NO FEAR," the Rolls cor-
respondent replied, "ANN. ARBOR
AUDIENCES ARE USED TO BUM
SHOWS. THEY HAVE BEEN GO-
ING TO SEE PLAYS AT MIMES ALL
YEAR AND THEY JUST FLOCKED
TO THE UNION OPERA. I'M SURE
YOU COUL;D SELL OUT YOUR
HOUSE ONCE IN A WHILE."
S* *
"I'LL COME!" said Robbie. "AND
ALL OF THE PROFITS ABOVE
WHAT WE MAKE I'LL GIVE TO
THE WOMEN'S LEAGUE!"
OUR OWN ROBBIE!!
Thus it is that Rolls is able and
pleased to present at this time ,a pic-

ture of Robbie arriving in town after
a prosperous sea son in Rockford:
(Space left here for cheers)
SPAC'E
ty
(Here the story about Robbie vas
cut short for a late wire flash that
follows:)
*' * *
YPSILANTI NORiWAL COLLEGE
HAS BIRTIIIDAY
* *' *
Ypsilanti Normal College, accord-
ing to a report received at a late hour
yesterday, will be 75 years old this
week. Everyone was astonished here-
abouts by the news.
* * *
ORIGINAL NORMAL GIRLS
STILL ATTEND SCHOOL
S Special Rolls investigators were

I---

I

THEATER
BOO KS
MVUSIC

FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 1928 !
Night Editor-NELSON J. SMITH, Jr.
THOMAS HARDY
Dying in the center of the historic
countryside which through his writ-
ings he was wont to portray to his
thousands of readers in the literary
world, the passing of Thomas Hardy,
eminent British novelist, greatly re-
sembled the man as he had been
recognized in life, uiet, serene.
To those who knew him as a
"shrinking, self-effacing, gray little
man," modest and unassuming, his
death, though feared for during his
illness of some weeks, came as a tre-
mendous blow; to the world of litera-
ture, the loss was regrettable to no
less a degree. .During the three score
years of his literary activity, Thomas
Hardy gave to the world a score of
novels, poems and dramas, greatly to
his credit. Not least among these
are "Tess of the D'Urbervilles," "The
Dynasts" aiid "Under the Greenwood
Tree."
As great a loss as is the death of
Thomas Hardy, it must have been
somewhat satisfying to the great au-
thor to know that such works as had
occupied the greater part of his life,
would live long after he ceased to
.write. And, it is not at all unlikely
that a predisposition which sighted
the darkness ahead, te'mpted Hardy to
write "Far From the Madding Crowd,"
one of his latest novels. Had it been
one of his wishes that he might leave
this world in such surroundings,
Thomas Hardy's last desire was an-
swered.
CHOOSING A CITY
(Editor's Note-This editorial
was written and set in type be-
fore the late news dispatch indi-
cating that the Democratic party
had chosen Houston, Texas, as the
convention city had come over
the wire. The selection of Hous-
ton, nevertheless, substantiates
the view expressed in this edi-
torial that neither San Francisco
nor Detroit were extremely suit-
able locatiens for the national
convention of the Democrats.)
With Kansas City already occupied
by the Republicans, reports from
Washington indicate that the Demo-
crats have eliminated all cities except
San Francisco and Detroit from con-
cidrn-n o --atin c - n->

TONIGHT: The Mimes present
"Seventh heaven" in their theater at
S:30 o'clock.
* * *
"THE THIRTEENTH CHAIR"
During a spiritualistic seance given
by a host following an elaborate din-
ner party-to amuse his guests more
than because of any real belief in the
science-the guest sitting in the
thirteenth chair is murdered. The
crime is committed while the lights
were out, but the mystery is made
doubly baffling because every door
and window leading to the room had!
been locked; every member of the cir-
cle had been holding his partner's
hand when the crime was committed;
and to prevent any fraud the medium
herself was securely tied, hand and
foot to the chair in which she had
been sitting.
To complete this amazing chain of
events, there is no trace of a weapon
to be found in the room. Carpets,
walls, linings of chairs, everything is
searched but no clue of a gun or dag-
ger can be located. This is the pleas-
antly enigmatical situation Bayard
Veiller has concocted for "The
Thirteenth Chair"-one of the first
"mystery" plays ever to grace Broad-
way, and which is being revived by
the Rockford Players as the opening
bill in their stock season which be-
gins Sunday evening, Jan. 22, in the
Whitney theater.
It is interesting to note that Bayard
Veiller has only this season saved
himself from the fate- of being a one-
play author by the success of "The
Trial of Mary Dugan" which opened
last Setember at the National theater
with Ann Harding and Rex Cherry-
man. The novelty of this play seems
to be that all three acts take place in
a courtroom with the audience as
spectators at the trial of a Follies girl
for the murder of a financier whose
mistress she had been.
* * *
It is remarkable otherwise for con-
taining the most quoted gag from the
shows-"You can't expect a girl like
me to go to hell in a wheelbarrow."
* * *
TFIE FACULTY CONCERT.
The University Symphony orchestra
under the baton of Samuel Lockwood,
with Mrs. Maude Okkelburg soloist,
will make its second seasonal appear.
ance Sunday afternoon in Hill audi-
torium with the following program:
Overture to "Joseph" .........Mehul
Rondo Capriccioso, Op. 14......
.Mendelssohn-Jungnickel
Symphony No. 5, C minor, Op. 67
.Beethoven
Allege con brio;
Andante con moto;
Allegro--Allegro- Tempo I-
Allegro.
Concerto, A minor, Op. 16......Greig
Allegro moderato;
Adagio- Allegro marcato.
"THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOht"
A review, by Harold May.
Chicago has tried many expedients
in an effort to forget the iciness of its
winds as they sweep around its street
corners, but it has never tried a better
one than "The Merry Wives of Wind-
sor," which is now showing at the
Illinois theater with Mrs. Fiske, Hen-
rietta Crosman, and Otis Skinner. This
play is as lively and joyful as spring,
as hoydenish as the Charleston, and as
faery as the Elf knight's horn. In its
presentation there has been no at-
tempt made to polish, to make more
polite; it is given with all the rough
and rude gusto that probably char-
acterized its first performance. (The
incident of the beating of Falstaff is
a piece of slapstick hardly ever equal-
led even by the movies.) For this
effect thanks is due to the director,

and credit should be given that, al-
though his sets wciuld have been mod-j
ern in 1860, his ideas of how the play1
should be performed date from the
sixteenth century,
Between Mrs. Fiske, who took the
role of Mistress Page and Henrietta j
Crosman, who played Mistress Ford,
there was little to choose. They were
Rabelaisian enough to have satisfied
Queen Elizabeth herself, and they took
such joy in the mock-deceit of their
husbands, and such impudent delight
in it even in the face of their hus-
band's almost ungovernable fury, that
they reminded the spectator of noth-
ing so much as the sprites pinchingj
Caliba. Otis Skinner's Falstaff was
a thieving, lying, wine bibing, pon- j
derous, red, and buttery fellow who
could take you into his confidence by
one leering wink of his eye, and in-
i gratiate himself into your good graces
by a hitch of his ponderous stomach.
A word should be said of the deft-
ness of the incidental music; it was
arranged, it seemed, to synchronise

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Two Good Places to Eat!l
Now that exams are in the offing,
it is not only adviseab le, but very
essential that you eat good well-
balance meals. The fact that we
can furnish the food is well known
to the maajority of you. Those of
you who have not learned this will
benefit by a trial in the near
future.
The Pride of Ann Arbor
Cpp. Wuerth Theater

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