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March 06, 1928 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-03-06

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PAC*', TW(I

TI-II MICHIGAN DAILY

1~AC~C 'ln~vo THu MICIITGAN DAILY TT1TX~DAY, MARCIT C, l,92~.

FACULTY "n" ATTEND IS SUCCESSFUL IN
EDUCATIONAL SOCIETY
MEE1TING IN. BOSTON' ,

Law Professor Will
Give Talk In Pontl.ic
Prof. TPo son R. Sun dorl and cof'the
Law school w ill addre>ss members of
t ho Pontiaic f[ta sociation onlMol1-
(la1y, March P i. concuern fl~ the (I es
tionl of 'Itelorm of(: AnD.-fak e Pro-
cedur In 10 i i( ga

PORTABLE
TYPEWRITERS
' Coronia, Underwood,
Reingtoun, Royal.
We have ail makes.
Sone in colored deco finishes.
0. D. MO RRlLL
17 Michels Arcade. Phone 6615.

I

EMITONSO' ELECTED TO IEAD
NEW 0IC'1ANiZATION O01"
INSPECTORS
MOEHLMAN GIVEN OFFICE

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f(ouitNIs Re-Elected Secretary
NatiJonal A ssoeiation Of
Cotllege T'eachers

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Several University faculty men
were honoredI with important posi-
tions in the various associations
which met in conjunction with the1
annual meeting of the National Edu-
catilonal association, and others gave
talks before the various sessions;
which were heldl during the greater
part of last week in Boston. Fifteen'
persons connected with the School)
of E~ducation were in Boston for
these ieetings, and a few made trips
to other Eastern cities to discuss{
current school matters with Eastern
officials.
A new organization was formed !
which will probably be known as the
Association of Regional Standardiz-
ing Agencies. Prof. James B. Edmon-
son of the Education school faculty
and state inspector of high schools
was elected as the first president of
the association, which will consist of;
representatives from the various dis-1
trict standardizing associations in the
country.j;
Courtis Is Re-Elected
Prof. A. B. Moehllman of the voca-
tional research dep't was elected presi-;
dtent of the American Educational Re-j
search association. Prof. Stuart A.
Courtis was re-elected secretary of
the National Society of College
Teachers of Education. ;
Professor Courtis also delivered an?
address before the same society ona
"The Place of the Research Bureau
in a School System." Professor Ed-1
monsoni led a general discussion upon
the relationship between high schools
and colleges. Miss Cleo Murtland, as-
sociate professor of vocational edu2-
cation, gave another address, takenj
fronr the work in which she spec-
ializes at the University, using as
her subject, "What is Being Done
to Prepare. Girls for Industry in the
Mid-West."
Emphasize Curricula Revision '
According to Prof. Calvin Olinl Da-
vis, who was one of those attending
the meeting, the emphasis of the
meetings was centered upon the cur-
ricula revisions in 'the high schools
andl other groups for education, and
also upon the raising of revenue for
educational purposes. Pres. A. Law-
rence Lowell of Harvard university
drew down, much criticism upon him-
self when he spoke before the meet-
ing upon the difficulties of obtaining
suffici nt funds for education, ;and
advocating the selective system 'for
college students. Ile was opposed
.heartily by several prominent school
men who held to the "education at
any cost" idea, and defended the
"old American standards."
Those who went from here were
Prof. James B. Edmon son, Prof. Geo. !
E. Myers, Prof. Calvin 0. Davis, Prof.
Clifford Woody, Prof. Arthur B.
Moehlman, Prof. Stuart A. Courtis,
Prof. George L. Jackson, Prof. Ral-
eigh Schorling, Prof. C. C. Fries, Prof.
G. C. Kyte, Prof. W. C. Trow, Prof. I
Hieber, H Ryan, Prof'. Francis D.
Curtis, Prof. Howard Y. McCluskv,
and Mrs. Hellen Shambaugh. More
than 250 school qfficials of Michigan
attended one or more of the various
meetings in Boston.

Captaini Alford Wllhim
Who success full; , matle a t st to
show the increase in -, 'ight of pilot,
airplane and all pa rts. Iii, idemoni-
strated that an outside loot) with rip
jupside-clown figure cighlt iacea OUwdlthe
weight five times. Captain \iflianni
is said to be the secondi aviator to ac-
complish this feat.
.alumni 'Association
Formed By Groupi1ng~t
Of Eleven Societies
(Continued from Page One)
tion of these local clubs. At the pre-
sent time there are about 165 of these I
University of Michigan clubs scat-
tered all over the United States and
a few in United States possessions.
Recently a" third executive officer,
ICharles J. Rash, '22, was appointed'
to stimulate the organization of the
alumni by classes, acting as secre-
tary' of the recently formed class se-
cretaries council. Wilfred B. Shaw,'
editor of the Michigan Alumnus, is!
also general secretary of the alumni
association. This organization, to-
gether with a large office force, gives
jMichigan one of the most if not the
' most effective alumni organizations in
the country, not only from the stand-
point of personnel, but also from thej
Swide extent of its activities.
EThe alumni association at p~resent
is controlled by a board of 22 direr-
tors, 12 of whom are elected by the
local University of Michigan clubs,
2 elected by alumnae councils, j
elected at large, and 3 elected to re-
present the class secretaries coon-
cil. The other 2 members of the
board are past presidents of the
association, and the piresident in of-
flpresides over the meetings of the'
board. The two past presidents of
the association now on the board are'
Judge Victor H. Lane, '74E, who was,
in office during the peri0(d 1.901-23.

Theirlives linked together
by a dog they were happy
h d the {demon jealousy-
.:: ; ~otoplay as captivating as it
N. t. riling and appealing-you'll
tis a genuine screen treat.
2lwdh IKENNETH THORANGE
S6($aEN peRVAR "M CtAA E C"N A g7I7.-4AOAR
RAROA OA 7
xn " OOOUICU? O .,tt PCVPS.
l r 1 1 E E K I) A Y
Ii31: I N EE S
M N I(GlITS
STARTING, THURSDAY!
ile-rn1 ' ngi ellient ofi'the (Createst 1'ictire of All rime!
JESSE I L f"
PaISENTS
IRA . JAMES CRUZE ODUCTIQkI

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EN( (CMNTLIIbI

4 PERFORMANCES DAILY

On the Stage and Screen Daily

Agai'n Acclaime
(Arid Officially Presented)
A Doctor's Degrele
As the Present and Pastmnaster of Authentic Thrilling
Ahtletic Feats Unequalled Oan Stage and Screen

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D. Ou..GL
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-IRBANl

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POLICY
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The athlete !
The daredevil !
The adventurer !
The idfol of all!
The international hero!
And now, in addition to these-
A new Fairbanks-
Doug, the lover!,

rryr .
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ORPHEUM
NOW SHOWING
Spced with
'Sophistication!
FiIlaVored with
romance!1

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If
at
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VI\
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of darig~g! -
le'll stagger you by his stunts
with the Bolas!
-le'll amaze you with his wild-
girl-of-the-pampas love !
f you liked "Robin
-food" and ""The Black
pirate "-you'll rave
about "Douglas
'airbanks as The
-aucho!"

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AN DDIIONT0CAEL SMOKE-LORE
WE SUBMIT the sad case of the freshman in zoology, who, when asked to
describe a camel, said, "A eanici is what you wish yoAt were smoking while
you try to think of the right answers." lie flunked zoology-bout be ]knew his
cigarettes. For in. timie of trial or tirne of joy, there's no friend like Camels.

4q

.;wu- _ ...

ISERVCEI

1

l"1103'I II E

STAGE

4
if

COL. FRED LINDSEY IN PERSON
T eaching the Art of the Don. G. Whip

STUIOS OF UNITED ARTISTS

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a i t TlT].Tt 1 TDT1'!t Th 1 TT "1.T A tyl 0.YIG 'T .il(1 f1-gul

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