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February 24, 1928 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1928-02-24

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1928

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postag~e, granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail,
$4.
Of.ices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May.
nard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
J4 H. CHAMBERLIN

La.
fl
ti
i2
P
I
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C

and unstilted achievement. A youth-
ful country cannot help but be at-
racted by a man who held his own
in six different vocations, varying
rom that of a longshoreman on the
Volga to that of a novitiate in a
monastary, all before he was seven-
een years old, and then brought his
own country and others to his feet
with his singing, maintaining this
popularity throughout a span of years.
Chaliapin is welcomed back to Hill
auditorium tonight.
EiNDING RIDICULE
According to an announcement
made recently by Philip Yarrow,
chairman of the Chicago Church Fed-
eration committee, more than 20 of
the leading motion picture producers
have agreed to exclude ridicule of the
Protestant clergy from their films in
the future. To the large majority
of American theater-goers the prob-
lem never assumed proportions of
major interests, but in some quartdrs,
and especially as a result of certain
pictures, the agitation seems to have
been especially strong.
On the whole the move seems to
be a wise one, nevertheless, for ridi-
cule of a profession which so large a
portion of the general public holds
in high regard cannot help but prove
offensive to that large portion. It is
not so much a question of a sacred
respect, or a superstitious regard for
a class of men, but it is more a ques-
tion of sheer good taste, and of re-
spect for feelings of others which,
while not shared, deserve to be ap
preciated.

Editor......... .......Ellis B. Merry1
Editor Michigan WeeklyCharles E. Behyner
Staff Editor...............Philip C. Brookst
City Editor........... .Curtland C. Smith
Women's Editor..........Marian L. Welles
Sports Editor ..........Herbert E. Vedder1
Theatsr, Books and Music.Vincet C. Wall, Jr.
relegraph Editor....... .Ross W. Ross1
Assistant City Editor. ...Richard C. Kurvink
Night Editors
Robert E. Finch G. Thomas McKean l
. Stewart Hooker Kenneth G. Patick
Paul J. Kern Nelson J. Smith, Jr1
Milton Kirshbaum
Reporters
Esther. Anderson lohn H. Maloney
Margaret Arthur Marion McDonald
Alex A.B1ochnowski Charles S. Monroe .
j ean Campbell Catherine Price
essie Church Harold L. Passman
Clarence N. Edelson Morris W. Quinn
:Margaret Gross Rita Rosenthal
Marjorie Follmer Eleanor Sribner
Sames B. Freeman Corinne Schwarz
bert T. essner Robert G. Silbar
Elaine E. Gruber Howard F. Simon 7
Alice Hagelshaw George E. Simons
Joseph E. Howell Rowena Stillman
J.. Wallace. Hushen Svvia Stone1
Charles R. Kaufman George Tilley
William F. Kerby Bfert. K. Tritscheler
LawrenceFR. Klein Edward L. Warner, Jr.
Donald J. Kline Benjamin S. Washer
Sally Knox Leo J. Yoedicke
Tack L. Lait, Jr. Joseph Zwerdlig
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
WILLIAM C. PUSCH
Assistant Manager... George H. Annable, Jr.
Advertising..............Richard A, Meyer
Advertising............. Arthur M. Hinkley
Advertising ..............Edward L. Hulse
Advertising............John W. Ruswinckel
Accounts...............Raymond Wachter
Circulation.............George B. Aln, Jr.
Publication..................Harvey Talcott
Assistants.
George Bradley Ray Hofelich
Marie Brummeer Hal A. Jaehn
Jam"esCarpenter JmsJordan
Charles K. Correll Maarion Kerr
Barbara Cromell Thales N. Lenington
Mar Dively Catherine McKinven
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Ona Felker Alex K. Scherer
KatherinekFrohne George Spaer
Douglass Fuller Ruth Thompson
Beatrice Greenberg Herbert E. Varnum
Helen Gross Lawrence Walkley
T r"J. Hammer Hannah Wallen
Carl W. Hammer
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1928
Night Editor-K. G. PATRICK
THE OFFER STANDS
On December 16, 1926, with a grace-
ful gesture which bespoke more a
gentlemanly withdrawal than indig-
nation, The Michigan Chimes passed
from existence as a crtitical medium
on the campus. Its passing was view-
ed with genuine regret by all of those
who had watched the interesting at-
tempt at pertinent and contemporary
ci'ticism. Chimes failed, not because
her mission was not worthy and well-
fulfilled, but because of a faulty busi-
ness department.
At the time of the failure, the Board
in Control of. Student Publications
made a statement of reason and a
declaration of policy for the future.
They offered to extend "financial sup-
port to any literary group on the
campus which can demonstrate its
ability to collect and publish creative'
work of merit." That offer has stood
since that time, but there has appear-
ed no group confident of its ability to
fulfill the conditions.
It is indeed strange and sad that this
offer has not been accepted and the
place of Chimes filled. There is a
definite place for the kind of criticism
that such a paper would supply. At
the present time there is a definite
medium which fills every need but
that for sane, constructive criticism;
and the entrance of such a paper into
the publishing field on the campus
would be greeted by the greatest en-
thusiasm from those who are inter-
eted in student ventures and who be-
lieve in the ability of the students to
analyze and evaluate their own place
in life.
The offer still stands. And as long
as it does, there is a definite chal-
lenge to those who criticise the "sit-
uation" (as they call it) at Michigan.
If certain groups of people on the
campus who are outspoken in their
contempt for The Michigan Daily and

the Inlander will come forward and
give their ideas the benefit of the light
and a fair trial, it is certain that the
result will either be a triumph for
their ideas and the cause of action
and right on the campus, or their crit-
icisms of the critical periodicals and
mediums which now exist will be for-
ever quieted. The offer of the board
stands as a perpetual challenge to
critics and thinkers on the campus.
CHALIAPIN
It is with anticipation that a lay
audience awaits Feodor Chaliapin,
nnr if+is not enrnrimine+that lie exer-

BOLT FOR
WE RECEIVED A letter yesterday
which invites us to join the Bolt party,
and put that honored gentleman in
the White House. We always thought
that we were the one behind himIn
but it seems that he has other sup-
porters, (not garters). We print
fragments of the leter:
* * *
BOLT CAMPAIGN HEADQUARTERS
On Main between Joe's and the Orient,
Near "31 Duffield"
Editor of Toasted Rolls,
Dear Jebbie,
In recognition of the services you
have performed in our behalf, it is
my privilege to offer you .a charter
membership in the "Bolt For Pres-
ident Club." By bestowing such an
honor as this upon you, we can par-
tially express our extreme gratitude.
Now Jebbie, because we do not want
a little thing like an initiation fee to
hold you back, we have decided to let
you do as the rest have done, that is
-to set your own fee. For example:
Dean Emery gave us a driving permit
for our campaign car (BUT NOT TO-
DAY); President Little proposed to
put a ban on the election and just
appoint Ben president; Professor
Hobbs vowed the support of the
Greenland electorate; Chief O'Brien
Promised a riot or two with free tear-
bombs for publicity in the metropoli-
tan newspapers; Dr. Lovell is donat-
ing his "Silver Tongue"; and the B
and G boys are furnishing our speak-
ers with shovels. I merely list these
things in order that they nmay aid
you in choosing an initiation gift.
Before asking you to make your
final decision as to whether or not
you will be for or against us. I think
it would be well if I enumerated the
))lanks in the Bolt Platform.
1. The immediate construction of
a tunnel into the Arboretum.
f 2. More "bans" including eight
f o'clocks and Harry Tillotson.
3. Bigger and better sidewalks.
4. A great armament program for
General Hobbs Grenland expedition.
5. A campus rostrum for Dr.
Lovell.
6. Fur coats and red derbies for
the Forestry students.
7. An elaborate shrubbery and
bench developement for Burns park,
- so as to relieve congestion in the
Arboretum tunnel.
Having thus outlined the purpose
f of our club, may I beg you to con-
sider our offer and help us elect "Ben
of Michigan."
- J. Seeze 'er,
Campaign Manager.
, * * *
e WE SHALL HAVE to consider be-
fore joining this organization, but our
e initiation fee will be in the form of
s funds to carry on the campaign, about
$1,000,000.00, BUT NOT TODAY.
* * C
- WITH ALL THIS backing it seems
inevitable that Bolt should win the
election. His club also states that he
e is WET.

THEATER
BOOKS
MUSIC

i

RAE
LAST TIMES TODAY
"THE BRONCHO
BUS@TER19
SATURDAY ONLY
Reginald Denny
In
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This "Ad" iihl1c admits you.
RAE_

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CAMPUS OPINION
Annonyrnous communications will be
disregarded. The names of communi-
cants will, however, be regarded as
confidential uponrequest. Letters pub
lished should not e construed as ex-
pressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily.
1PREPAIRATION FOR TEACHING
To the Editor:
In last Sunday's Daily appeared an
article entitled "Educational Courses'
by E. A., '30, who, quoting some
teacher out in the field, assures us o
the uselessness of the majority o1
courses offered in the School of Edu-
cation. This is a sadly erroneous in-
dictment on the school.
The person who asserts that she has
had no need for history of education
school administration, psychology
seminars, etc., is a genius who pos
sesses inherently knowledge which
most people have to acquire, or else
is blissfully ignorant of her real du-
ties and responsibilities as a teacher
I admit that there are details in his-
tory of education which are not o
great value, but a knowledge of the
evolution of our educational system is
necessary for adequate understand
ing. Not only does history enable a
person to better understand education
but it also can be used to make th
subject matter more interesting. To
the teacher and pupil it reveals th
important fact of progress which i
one of the most stimulating things
for further effort.
If the teacher is going to be some-
thing more than a mere automaton
discharging the functions assigned to
her without any voice whatever in th(
shaping of our educational institu
tions for the ends which correspon
to her ideas and ideals, then it is im.
perative that she knows something
about the mechanism and principle
involved in school operation and ad-
ministration. It is highly desirabl
that the teacher realize her respon
sibility in bringing about change
which are better adapted to our mod
ern life and its needs. Furthermore
a teacher who thinks that the scop
of her duty i definitely confined t
the classroom, and that she is of n
account in the school and comm-unity
as a whole, cannot inspire in he
pupils the true democratic spirit o
independence, initiative, and coopera
tion.
The course offered in educationa
psychology, to which E. A. referre
as "more psychology," emphasize
those important phases which merel
receive a hasty consideration in gen
eral psychology. It deals with th
psychology of learning, studies th
native equipment of the individua
and the methods of producing usefu
changes in him, and investigates the
factors influencing his development
A person who does not appreciate thi
contribution to his understanding o
human development does not hav
even an embryonic conception of th
true nature of the educative process
It seems to be peculiar individua
psychology to learn more effectivel
from observing others than doin
yourself. No doubt, it would be de
srable to see experts teach, but as a
rule without doing a thing yoursel
you cannot acquire the skill. It seem
to be more profitable, in most cases
to have formed good habits in teach
inz unrr nn nxnort priti 1dtnien

-TONIGHT: The Rockford Players I
present "Clarence" by Booth Tark-
i gton in the Whitney theater at S :15
o'clock.
TONIGHT: The Mimes present "The
Home Towners" by George M. Cohan
in their theater at 8:30 o'clock.
* * *
THE MAY FESTIVAL
The stupendous list of world fam-
ous stars of opera and concert, who
have been engaged at fabulous prices
to come all the way to Ann Arbor for
the Festival this year are as follows.
We have taken the liberty to append
some necessary identification in cer-
tain instances:
MARGARET MATZENAUER, con-
tralto. (Madam was at one time the
most glorious contralto singing in
grand opera; she was chiefly famous
last season for filing a bankruptcy
plea, which got more front page space
than her singing.)
PERCY GRAINGER, pianist. (He
has just returned from an Australian
concert tour; he will conduct in per-
t son a performance of his "Marching
Song ef Democracy" at the Friday
evening concert.)
THE CHICAGO SYMPHONY OR-
CHESTRA, Frederick Stock, conduc-
tor. (The Chicago Symphony almost
went on the rocks last year financial-
ly, but by some divine intervention
in the shape of a $500,000 legacy are
in the field again this season.)
CHASE BAROMEO, basso. (A really
remarkableĀ° local prodigy from the
studio of Theodore Harrison.)
MARIE MONTANA, soprano. (Out
for the Marion Talley sweepstakes
next season.)
BENNO RABINOF, violinist. (Al-
most a sensation last season as a
fiddler out of N'Yawk's tenderloin
1district.)
MARGUERITE D'ALVARFZ, so-
prano. (Late of the Chicago Civic, and
this season on tour with George
Gershwin; she possesses a good voice
and some artistry.)
LEONORA CORONA, soprano. (A
very beautiful and frizzy blonde from
the Metropolitan. She debuted very
well in Trovatore and seems to have
the goods.)
And in addition: LEONE KRUZE,
soprano; MERLE ALCOCK, contralto;
PAUL ALTHOUSE, tenor; TUDOR
DAVIES, tenor; MARION BASIOLA,
baritone; RAYMOND KOCH, baritone;
PALMER CHRISTIAN, organist.
FEODOR CHALIAPIN
A review, by Vincent Wall.
They used to say that Chaliapin
had never learned to sing; and per-
haps he never has in our occidental
interpretation of the term. He has a
peculiar technique in forcing his
voice-sometimes by main strength-
to perform the feats which he de-
mands of it. Probably half of his ap-
peal lies in his dramatic intensity
which unites musician, actor and man
I into one-the artist.
Last night's concert proved, how-
ever, that of these the musician was
perhaps the least. He still has a
I marvelous breath control, but it fail-

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* * *
MAY THEY LIVE FOREVER
Dear Jeb:
I enclose a clipping from y

Your

. I

ed to nrorl cdnfai

o Lepro uce the spini atbl
afternoon contemporary: ' results that are
".Doctors and fashion experts of pests His mezquite naturally ex-
France have declared that the death anected. His mezzo-voce is his forte,
rate amongst French women is in ad- endo canmin occasion summon a tre-
verse proportion to the length of their mendous and telling volume of sound
skirts. French women are said to from his upperpregister.
have never been so healthy as since But it is initerpretation that he is
Sthe master-the world's greatest
coming of knee-length csirt.' singer. Chahiapin has without doubt
Tcomin gs of eelths skirts - looked on the vodka at its blackest;
The findings of these scientists sug- and he has caughit from his own most
gest a couple of questions: vital expereiences the tragic depth
Why should any woman ever' be ill? of his music, and from the same
Is it true that chorus ladies in cer- ois aui, and prnget s e
tain metropolitan productions have al- sor. As an tnal sse is
read acievd imoraliy? umor. As an emotional basso, he is
ready achieved immortality? prbbytewrl'Iraet
Tv.... A ,'p b h r g t

rI/
ANY way you figure it, P. A. is bette tobacco.
Take fragrance, for instance. Your well-known
olfactory organ will tell you. And taste-who
can describe that? And mildness-you couldn't
ask for anything milder.
Yes, Sir, P. A. is cool and comfortable and
inellow and mild. Long-burning, with a good
clean ash. You never tire of P.A. It's always the sdmeea
same old friendly smoke. Get yourself a tidy -
reel tin and check everything I'm telling you!
The more you kn
about tobaccos.

* * *
PERSONALLY WE WOULD like to!
see every woman prepare to live to
about 110 years. But then some of
them might catch cold.
* C *
USE A MACHINE GUN
Jebby:
Yep, it actually happened. Do we
let it live? -
It seems that it was in a bakery
shop down on the Main drag. Any-
way, a scholar entered. "Have you,
read 'Rolls' today?" he asked.
"No," replied the other, "ours are,
only white."
What to do, what to do.!
Capand Anchor.

We Americans, accustomed to a
conventional repertoire can hardly
be expected to comprehend his choice
of program. We waited in vain for
arias from Rossini's Basilio; from
Boito or Gounod's Mesfistofele; or
or from Leporello from "'Don Giovan-
ni." Instead we were given Rimsky-
Korsakov, Moussorgsky, Borodin, and
Kennemann.
THE UNIVERSITY SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA
The University Symphony orchestra
will make its third appearance of the
season in the Fourth Faculty con-
cert in Hill auditorium Sunday after-
noon, Feb. 26, at 4:15 o'clock. Samuel
Pierson Lockwood will conduct.
Mrs. Mabel Ross Rhead of the piano
department of the University School
of Music will appear as soloist. She
will render Saint-Saens piano con-

BOLT FOR PRESIDENT
* C * I

I

WHAT WITH THE weather jump-j
ing around fron winter to s rn -th,

t
. +

way it is it takes a good man to guess certo in G Minor. An octet by Gade
will e naved bya. sme irinn nr

oW
the

I

I

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