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January 12, 1928 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-01-12

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THURSDAY,. JANUARY 12, 1929

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

~1

ERLANSON COMPLETES
ANOTHER REPORT ON
FLORA OFGREENLAND
WAS MEMBER OF UNIVERSITY
GREENLAND EXPEDITION
LAST SUMMER
MAY RETURNTHIS FALL
At Present Is At Godhaven, Wintering
With Dr. Porsild, Authority On
Northern Plant Life
Carl 0. Erlanson, who accompanied
the University Greenland expedition
last summer as botanist,dand who is
studying the flora of Greenland on a
fellowship from the American-Scand-
inavian society, has recently sent his
second report to the Foundation from
Godhaven, Disko Island, off the west
coast of Greenland, where he is
winteing, with Dr. Porsild, the
authority on far northern plant life.
In the report Erlanson says that
hi summer discoveries have extend-
ed the distribution area of several
plants. At the time of writing he had
not, however, made a close enough
comparison of his finds with Dr.
Porsild's Godhaven herbarium to an-
nounce definitely whether he had un-
covered any,new species.
May Return Soon.
In a letter to Ann Arbor, Erlanson
indicated .that he might return to the
University in September, but his plans
as still uncertain. He may leave God-
haven for Copenhagen on the first
boat next spring, study in Europe dur-
ing the summer, and return to the
states in the fall, or he may spend
another summer collectingin Green-
land, and catch the last boat back to
civilization before the winter season.
Godhaven, which is now in the
period of perpetual night, is in fairly
good radio communication with the
outside world, but as yet it has not
been possible to reach Erlansonfrom
Ann Arbor. A wireless message
which he addressed to Ann Arbor
was picked up recently at Copenhagen
and forwarded by mail from there.
He reported ,being able to pick up pro-
grains from KDKAin Pittsburgh, and
efforts are now being directed toward
reaching him through that station.
OPEN PRIZE ESSAY
TRIALS IN SCHOOLS
Of the more than fifty me. Is in
the world, iron plays the most part
in industry. Its toughness makes it
useable for soft iron magnets, cast
* iron radiators, malleable iron for
railway cars, steel girders, wire, and
tools. There is something about
iron, however, that makes it unsuita-
ble for certain uses. It rusts quick-
ly and if not protected will complete-
ly change to iron rust in time.
Lead, on the other hand, possesses
qualities which make it useful for
many things totwhich iron is un-
suited. One of the chief of these is
the use in coating telephone cables
to protect them against weathering.
By its use telephone companies are
enabled to carry over-a hundred wir-
es in one cable, which, if they were
strung separately on telephone poles
would be lvery difficult to install. By
using a cable as many as 1200 pairs
of wires have been brought together
in a small space. The lead covering
on these cables will bend easily in-
stead of breaking, it can be handled
easily and it is not greatly affected
by changes in temperature.

Marine Corps Commanders Plan Further
Operations In New Nicaraguan Campaign'
r-
A veteran campaigner, Maj. Gen. John A. LeJeone, commandant of the
marine corps, and Brig. Gen. Logan Feland, once more taking command of
the marine corps in Nicaragua, are seen studying maps in Washington,
preparatory to sailing for Nicaragua.
R T TYOST IS MAIN SPEAKER
DEBATERS TO RAT FOOTBALL BANOUET

PHOTOGRAPHIC PLATES'
MADE OFCARD INDX
Among the more recently added
books in the general reading room of
the Library are the first 12 volumes
of photographic plates of the card
index file of the National library of
France, at Paris. The books which,
when finished, will include all books
from letters M to Z, inclusive, were
first conceived by Administrator-Gen-
eral Roland-Marcel who expects the
work to be completed in less than
three years.
The Library is considered the larg-
est in the world, the cataloging of the
first half of the books requiring 50
years to complete. There are more
than 5,000,000 volumes to be cata-
logued. While the photographic work
is being done the regular card filing
is taking places and it is expected that
50 more years will be required to have
a complete card system.
One volume, , San-to-Til, consisted
of 4,004 photos of cards. The books
nrdrnoli lno nowll a

RARE BOOKS OBTAINED0
TO ADD TO LIBRARY
Haass Memorial Collection Made One
Of Most Valuable In Existence
At Present Time
GIVEN BY DETROIT LAWYER'
Included in the six books added
Tuesday to the Earnest Haass Memor-
ial library are nine valuable medical
incunabula. All of these books are
extremenly rare, having been printed
in Italy before 1500, and three of
them are to be found nowhere else in
this country. According to Dr. Al-
dred Warthin of the pathology depart-
ment, the new books are in excellent
condition, and make this collection of
medical incunabula one of the finest
in existence.
This library is being donated by
Walter Haass, '04L, a Detroit lawyer
in memory of his brother Earnest,
.x~h mr~nnfnAfrn fh ai sl

always concerned
about your needs..
True to all better things of
life quality is the paramount
feature. When we slight
standards, quality depreciates.
Our standards in all Printing
and Ruling work are rigidly
maintained and never vary
from year to year.
PRINTING AND RULING
Stationers, Printers, Binders and Office Outfitters
112 South'Main Street Phone 4515

are arrange in cass as we as who graduated from thileue edcai
Fielding H. Yost, director of inter- alphabetical system. Those on law school in 1890. Ten books totalling
FRHOM F IRST CO N TEST collegiate athletics, was the main and political science are already com- 29 medical incunabula comprise the
speaker at the annual football dinner pleted.
given Tuesday night by the Sandusky Roland-Marcel, the originator ofpresent collection, which is kept
Affirmative Team Meets Knox College Kiwanis clubs. The dinner was held the methods now used, will be in the rare book room of the Main Ii-
In No-Decision Argument On in honor of members of the Sandusky Ann Arbor some time next semester brary. They are to be seen on ethi-
Baumes Law high school's 1927 football team, I to deliver a lecture. The exact date bition in the corridor of the library
champions in their section. has not yet been ascertained, however. in about two weeks.
TIHREE MEN MAKE TRIP
Michigan's affirmative debate team IIIII|11111111Ilillllllllllllllllllllll11111rhIlIIIllII111tI3IllIIIIUih111 iII illtt[11111111111 lFHIllIt
will return to Ann Arbor some time -
today after having opposed a Knox
college team last night at Galesburg,
Ill., in its first intercollegiate debate '
of the year. _ e
The University team composed of --v r l SCHOolofMm.IC
Jarl Andeer, '29, Wiliam C. Bishop,
'28, and Ormand J. Drake, '28Ed were = Second Semester Begins Feb. 6
the guests of the Galesburg Chamber,

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I

of Commerce in the annual debate be-
tween the two schools. No judges
decision was given following the con-
test which was held immediately after
the regular chambor of commerce
banquet.
The subject for the debate was Re-
solved that the principles of the
Baumes law of New York should be
enacted into law in the other state's.
It is the same subject which will be
used in the Central league debates a
week later between Ohio, Northwest-
ern, and Michigan.
Of the three men who made the
trip, Drake alone has had any prev-
ious experience with inter-collegiate
debates having served as alternate to
the , Michigan negative in the Mid-
West debates last year.
The same team will represent the
University in the Northwestern debate
in Hill auditorium on Jan. 20, the
last night of the first semester. On
the same night the Michigan negative
team composed of Richard Savage,
'30L, Elliott Moyer, '30L, and Paul
Franseth, '29, will meet Ohio State at
Columbus.
The team debating at Knox made
the trip unaccompanied as neither its
alternate, John E. Webster, '30P, or
its coach Prof. James M. O'Neill were
to take the trip. Howard Simon, '30,
is the negative alternate.
A job dictionary has appeared in
London 'stating 16,857 ways of making
an honest living. They include such
unusual vocations as goose girls,
body slitters for shirts, body notchers
for tin, ale tasters, and airplane cox-
wains.

Degree and Certificate Courses for those who are
Candidates for Graduation

GENERAL

COURSES FOR SPECIAL STUDENTS
V. MOORE, MUSICAL DIRECTOR

EARL

BYRL FOX BACH ER, Solfeggio
GLENN CARLSON, Sociology
PALMER CHRISTIAN, Organ
DONNA ESSELSTYN, Piano
1NICHOLAS FALCONE, Band Instruments
MARIAN STRUBLE FREEMAN, Violin
LUCILE GRAHAM, Piano
JAMES HAMILTON, Voice
TH1EOI)ORE HARRISON, Voice
JUVA HIGBEE, 3ethods
R. T. D. HOLLISTER, Public Speaking
NORA CRANE HUNT, Voice
CASSIUS JOLLEY, Solfeggio
GRACE JOH ON KONOLD, Voice
EDITh KOON, Piano
ALBERT LOCKWOOD, Piano
SAMUEL PIERSON LOCKWOOD, Violin

GLENN McGEOCH, History
MARGARET MacGREGOR, Organ
JOSEPH E. MADDY, Methods
GUY MAIER, Piano
LOIS MAIER, Piano
MARTHA AERKLE, 'Piano
MAUD OKKELDERG, Piano
LILA PARGMENT, French
IANNS PICK, 'Cello
MABEL ROSS RHEAD, Piano
LEON SLATER, Psychology
HELEN SNYDER, Rhetoric
OTTO J. STAHL, Piano and Theory
NELL B. STOCKWELL, Piano
MAY A. STRONG, Voice
WALTER WELKE, Methods
NORA B. WETMORE, Voice
ANTHONY J. WHITMIRE, Violin

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Formal .Attire
-S -
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Ib/ always ahead
/ Starting at
K A5C.oBarth
619 E. Williams
Spring Woolens Are Arriving
COME IN AND SEE THEM
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For further information please address,
CHARLES A. SINK, President

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KIDDIES ..:.14lc

ANOTHER
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Q Ig91 1t11#f1i11#110iH1i11111E11i1111111111it1111111111111"111111i11111111111HIM11111111It1111111111111111111111111111i11111IIIH;

I

-TODAY--
He's Here Again!!!

What

Will

1928

Mean for

You?

Will it be your last
in college?

year

Possibly it is the year you
have planned to enter busi-
ness - and prove you have
ability to make good!
But are you prepared for " busi-
ness? Have you a thorough
knowledge of the fundamental
laws of Finance, Management,
Production and Distribution?
Babson Institute offers you the
opportunity of a training in the
methodq as well as the theories of
business. Here you would be
taught to do the things expected
of you in actual business.
Your college training would
prove an excellent-foundation for
this intensive course.

Note
Students enter four times a year
" and continue nine consecutive
months. Enrollment strictly lim-
ited. Waiting list at opening of
Fall and Winter terms, and very
few vacancies for next term
starting Apri1 2, 1928.
Fat.
S ..
D :
Send for Booklet
It shows how, by following busi-
ness methods, our students are
thoroughly trained for leadership.
Fill in attached coupon.
Babson Institute, U
* 318 Welleslev Avenue,
V Babson. Park, Mass.
* Send me, without obligation g
B "Training for Business Leader-
N ship" and complete particulars
I about lBabson In::itute. i
0 I

Presented by
Carl Laeminle
Story by
Reginald Denny
A Rollicking Farce Comedy of Speed and Love!
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 2:00.3:40
z 7.:00.5:40
Balcony
20c
Main Floo
i4je

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_Comndy
"Newlyweds
Surprise"

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