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February 19, 1928 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1928-02-19

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PAGE FOUR

'I1 1=i I" -I 'I'IGAN L)AL LY

SUND)AY, EIIRUARY 19, 1928

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches creditedrto it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $+oo; by mail,
Officd r:eAnn Arbor Press Building, May-
aiard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business 21214
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDIT'jR
JO H. CHAMBERLIN
Editor..............Ellis B. Merry
Editor Michigan Weekly.. Charles E. lehymer
Staff Editor............ .Philip C. Brooks
City Editor............Courtland C. Smith
Women's Editor...........Marian L. Welles
Sports Editor..........Herbert E. Vedder
Theater, Books and Music.Vincent C. Wall, Jr.
Telegraph Editor........... Ross W. Ross
Assistant City Editor.... Richard C. Kufvink
Night Editors
Robert E. Finch G. Thomas McKean
Stewart Hooker Kenneth G. Patrick
Paul J. Kern Nelson J. Smith, Jr
Milton Kirshbaum
Reporters
Esther Anderson Iohn H. Maloney
Margaret Arthur Marion McDonald
A A. Bochnowski Charles S. Monroe
Jean Campbell Catherine Price
Jessie Church Harold L. Passman
Clarence N. Edelson Morris W. Quinn
Margaret Gross Rita Rosenthal
Valborg Egeland Pierce Rosenberg
Marjorie Follmer Eleanor Scribner
es B. Freeman Corinne Schwarz
RoetJ. Gessner Robert G. Silbar
Elaine E. Gruber Howard F. Simon
Alice Hagelshaw George E. Simons
oseph H. Howell Rowena Stliman
IWallace Hushen Sylvia Stone
Charles R. Kaufman George Tilley
William F. Kerby Bert. K. Tritscheller
Lawrence R. Klein Edward L. Warner, Jr.
Donald J. Kline Benjamin S. Washer
Sally Knox Leo J. Yoedicke
Jack L. Lait, Jr. Joseph Zwerdling
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
WILLIAM C. PUSCH
Assistant Manager... George H. Annable, Jr.
Advertising..... .......Richard A. Meyer
Advertising..............Arthur M. Hinkley
Advertising...............Edward L. Hulse
Advertising.............John W. Ruswinckel
Accounts................Raymond Wachter
Circulation.............George B. Ahn, Jr.
Publication...............harvey Talcott
Assistants

George Bradley
Marie Brummelr
James Carpenter

Ray Hofelich
hal A. Jaehn
James Jordan

Charles K. CorrelI lMarion Kerr{
Barbara Cromell Thales N. Lenington
Mary Dively Catherine lMcKinven
Bessie V. Egeland Dorothy Lyons
Ona Felker Alex K. Scherer
Katherine Frohne George Spater
Douglass Fuller Ruth Thomp son
Beatrice Greenberg Herbert E. arnumn
Helen Gross Lawrence Walkley
. J. Hammer Hannah Wallenr
CariW. Hammer
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1928
Night Editor--NELSON J. SMITH, Jr.
i.'j EVANS STATION
The weather has long been a knotty
problem against which man has had
to contend for his recreation, his din-
ner, and often his- life. Government
weather bureaus, daily weather maps,
plus the telegraph and the wireless
have taken the burden of weather
predicting off of unreliable corns and
rheumatism and placed it on scien-
tific shoulders of greater dependabil-
ity. Predictions have, indeed, become
so accurate that those who follow the
sea and those who venture on the air
are willing to stake their lives these
days on the weather man's word.
With lives in the balance, on sea
and in the air, any contribution to the
science of predicting weather, espe-
cially of predicting bad weather, can-
not be regarded with indifference.
To those whose researches are mak-
ing more accurate predictions possi-
ble we must take off our hats, and
foremost among those is Professor
William Herbert Hobbs, whose energy
and genius has put the weather sta-
tion in Greenland that is making the
prediction of North Atlantic storms
a present possibility and a future cer-
tainty.
Professor Hobbs has discovered
that the violent disturbances over the
Atlantic have their origin on the icy
slopes of the Greenland ice-cap, and
he has put a complete weather station
on the edge of this ice-cap to study
the storms. On six occasions sincet
the station went into operation lastE
July Hobbs' men in Greenland have
recorded violent storms which two
days later vexed the traveled lanes
between New York and Europe. The
possibility of bro4dcasting warnings
of such storms is thus indicated, and
lacks only further investigation to be
assured.
Professor Hobbs is at present en-
gaged in collecting funds for a third
expedition to Greenland; money is
necessary to furnish a personnel and
supplies for the Mt. Evans station.
His enterprise has a worthy *im, it
has proved that it is justified, and it
gives brilliant promise of scientific
and practical results. It is to be
hoped that he will have every suc-
cess in prosecuting to a triumph what
he has so well begun.
FLOOD RELIEF
Affm n, fn mrnnli of e.nntorvan

burden of flood prevention onto the
federal government.
Whereas the engineers' corps plan
has allotted a sum of $296,000,000
from the federal treasury for the pur-
poses of relief works, the committee
plan provides $473,000,000 from the
federal government for the work-
with the local communities bearin
none of the cost. If passed it means
the embodiment of the views of Her-
bert Hoover, secretary of commerce
and likely Republican presidential
candidate, in place of the views of
Calvin Coolidge.
From a number of standpoints, then,
the new bill is extremely interesting,
and its progress through the various
stages of its Congressional career
will be an insight into the remaining
strength of the Coolidge contingent
in addition to an elaboration of the
policy which the government will I
follow in regard to one of its most
important problems.
CURTAIN
Every once in a while out of the
great maze and multitude of the thea-
ter world there emerges a figure that
is particularly worthy, or else is par-
ticularly remembered. Eddie Foy,
who died Thursday in Kansas City,
was both. Never since his sixteentl-
year when he took to the comic stage
in Chicago had he forsaken or retired
from his profession. Making people
j laugh was as much a part of his day
as was eating and sleeping, and he
could see no reason for giving it up.
The story is still told of Eddie Foy's
heroism in the famous Iriquois thea-
ter fire in Chicago. Perceiving the
danger, he pleaded with actors and
audience, and carried on his per-
formance on the stage for several
minutes to attract the attention of the
latter and bring order out of the
I chaos. He was the last to leave the
theater.
'The vaudeville performer probably
receives less applause and remunera-
tion and does more work than any
other creature of the stage, and his
peculiar task keeps him among his
own kind and out of sight of the rest
of the world. But the two-or-three-
a-day routine has bred many remark-
able and valued characters, and Eddie
Foy was one of these.I
Joseph Bryan, voted the most
original man on the Princetoncampus
last year is now serving a term in a
Russian prison. Still being original,
I at any rate.
One of the things that Scotchmcn
allow people to have at their expense
is a joke.
The Union is going to try to arouse
interest in another amendment.
CAMPUS OPINION
Annonymous communications will be
disregarded. The names of communi-
cants will, however, be regarded as
confidential upon request. Letters pub-
lished should not be construed as ex-
Pressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily.
EDUCATIONAL COURSES
To the Editor:
Criticising her preparation and
training a teacher who was graduat-
ed from this University last year,
says that she has not needed the
courses she received In history o
education, s c h o o 1 administration
training, or review courses in high
school subjects. She feels "no espe-
cial need of more psychology," and

has met no need of advanced semi-
nars "-- yet." She feels that eight
weeks of practice teaching is plenty,
and that "llractice teaching can hard-
ly instill into the collegiate that
yearning for skill, grace, and wisdom
which gets hold of the new teacher
who is anxious to make good."
At the same time, however, this
teacher says that there are several
courses which she wishes had been
offered when she was in school, be-!
cause of the practical value which
they would have had. She would
have liked more observation of teach-j
ing if it had been varied, with three
or four days observing each of six or
eight expert teachers. This would be
more valuable than anything else, if
intelligently done, she believes. I
She has also felt the need of a
course concerning such things as
where to order pictures, music, and
similar materials to illustrate one's
work; what are good source materials
for high school use; up-to-date,
richly illustrated supplementary read-
ing; and ideas now in use in endowed
schools or practice schools, to make
dry subject matter vital and compel-)
ing. And she would like this ma-1
terial embalmed in notes; addresses,j
authors, artists, magazines, to which
a new teacher can send for things
on any of the subjects he might be
I nled1 unn ftortah.

IF THESE FRESHMEN are puppies
and their feet are of such importance,
what is the result when they have
flat feet or low arches. Perhaps they
might be called low minded.
* * *

TONIGFF: The Rockford
present Booth Tarkington's
ence" in the Whitney theater
o'clock.

Players
"Clar-
at 8:1i

ON THE OTHER HAMD
Jeb, old bay: "THE CONSTANT WIFE"
Like the tail of a dog, that "puppy" A. review, by Vincent Wall.
story by Secretary Shirley was tacked The Whitney theater played host
on the end of his recent view of the to an extraordinary production of
University college. And if a new I "The Constant Wife," last evening.
freshman is going to be called a It was a performance entirely out of
puppy because his feet don't behave, the tradition of high comedy, and
why not let sleeping dogs lie, espe- Som-erset Maugham would probably
cially if the 'dogs' are all tired out have been properly shocked to have
from not behaving. seen what happened to his perfectly
And anyway, "dogs" may be able conventional comedy of manners
to sneak into the newly opened-and- when it was burlesqued in such
closed-at-sunset aboretum. Witness wholesale fashion by the Mesdames
the campus dogs. Walker and Bunting, assisted in odd
Secretary Smith referred to Hector moments by the World's Greatest

G A H A MS

Service and Honest Advertising

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_i
r.

and the patrolman. Since when did
ye ancient and at least honorable
Greeks and Trojans or whatever they
were have 'coppers'?
A freshman may be a puppy BUT
NOT TODAY.
Capand Anchor.
* -: *
WE LEARN FROM yesterday's
Daily that professors read detective
stories while the students of the
University read poetry, biography and
essays. From this we may deduce
E that some of our professors are hu-
man despite outward appearances to
the contrary.
* * *
PERSONALLY IT IS OUR opinion
that most of the students envy the
man who has the courage to read the
thrillers in the detective story field.
But students must appear cultured,
so the better books have their sales
FROM THIS SUIRVEY it. seems that
the relation of teacher and student
should be reversed. Yes, there are
several profs we would like to flunk
j out of school.
TO ?
I watch Ann painting Eloise,
And think about them both; you
see
I hope that each of themloves me.
Enough to ask, "Come to me,
pl ease."
Ann sitting there portraying thee,
Her hair all ruffled by the breeze,
Her skirt revealing silken knees,
Is warmer far, than you, to in-.
I do not know what I shall do,
Alone I can but think of you.
When I'm with Ann I love her
best,
With Eloise I'm sure I'm blest.
The drink's on me, Ann married
Bill,
And Eloise eloped with Phil.
Poison 11-Y.
* * *
BUT NOT TODAY
IT WOULD SEEM that the best
way to become intelligent (for all pro-
fessors are at least that) would be
to read stories about the triumphs of
Holmes and the rest of the plain
clothes men. But gosh, if any of
you have even talked to a policeman
or detective, you know that, accord-
ing to Shirley Smith's figure of thI
puppy and the brains in the feet af-
fair, these officers of the law have
fallen arches, bunions, corns and all
that goes to make feet a trouble to
the owner and everyone else.
* :, ,*
PROFESSOR DECLARES
NEED OF RAPID WORWi
ON NEW EXCAVATIONS
-Yesterday's Daily.
PROFESSOR BOAK OF the history
department heartily endorsed Rolls
expedition to the Economics building
in his talk over the radio recently.
He states that this is the only way
of finding out what we don't know.
THIS POLLS EXPEDITION may
find some valuable material for a new
history of the University. It is
thought that the material to be found
will explain just why Freddy Taylor
ever wrote that book of his and why
he isn't out in the business world
(most sophomores wish he were), but
it is extremely doubtful.
* * *

Lover.
in siot"'The Constant Wife" was
a wholly amusing farce, played for
broad comedy, instead of being the
pseudo problem play that Maugham
made it. The question is which ver-
sion is the best. Ann Arbor was both
shocked and amused by the one last
night. And fully half lthe audience
thought the the cast was tight during
most of the first act, when it was ap-
parent that most of the familiar
dtaples or parlor comedy were being1
horsed within an inch of their lives.
I never hope to see a show more un-
mericifully kidded; but it was cer-
tIainly entertaining.
Norman Hackett, as the odd corner
i1 t1w (11i netic polygon, was one of
thos' i. who kept out of the general
horscplayy going on. And he did ex-
c'ptionally well in a not particularly
eiriking role.
Charlott e Walker has not changed
a great deal since the days when she I
thri lled the tank towns with "The
!Tail of the Lonesome Pine." S'he is
a very capable actress and handledI
the role of the wife well. 1er final
speeches, however, instead of be-
coming a salutary broadsie at our
barbaric marriage laws, were the
only ones in which she endeavored to
give the satire anything like a fair
chance of~ bein.- understood
Einma Bunting played Mary Louise
like a forty year old ingenue, and
lthough this conception of the part
was raf cer startling at first, it was
entirely'i ile 'spirit of tie evening,
a tY not wit 1iunt. its value. Lou, Tel-
c lgen did practically the saime thing,
and was effective as the hybrid Eng-
lishman. A show done in this man-
ner would be awful is not done well;
but as it was, the suave sophistry of I
Mr. Maugham suffered little.
TH1E hOME TOWNERS"
Mimes' production of the George
Cohan farce, "The Home Townen
has been postponed from Tuesday
until Monday night of this week. This
is a play of the usual Cohan type-
written and acted by that gentleman
who has waved his country's flag in
more theaters than any other actor
or playwright in the country.
Mimes have the distinction of being
the first organization to present this
comedy in the vicinity as it has but
recently been released for stock pro-
duction*
ELSIE HERNDON KEARNS
Mr. McIntyre has made final con-
firmation of the appearance of Elsie
lerndon Kearns' engagement as
guest artist with the Rockford Play-
ers in their stock season in the Whit-
ney theater. Miss Kearns will appear

e--
.--RA.NGER' S
ANNUAL ASHINGTOWS BIRTHDAY DANCE
TUESDAY NIGHrT
to1 $1.00 per couple
Music by
Bill Watkins' Eleven Wolverines
BUD GOLDEN, DIRECTING
Also dancing Ithis weeb .
Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday
Granger' s Academy

,. ..

H EA
TOM SEYILL
World-Famed
Lecturer and Poet
at
FIRST
METHODIST CHURCH
Cor. State and Wash.
Sunday Eve., 7:30
Sub ect-"Mussolini and
the Black Shirts"

BRING YOUR LAUNDRY TO OUR
CASH AND CARRY OFFICE
WHERE YOU
SAVE 15
ON YOUR BILL
WHITE SWAN LAUNDRY
Cash and Carry Branch Office

THEATER
BOOKS
MUSIC

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We wish to thank the Campus for the largest Second Semester
Opening Business we have ever enjoyed.
Both Ends of the Diagonal

Open 7 a. in. to 8 p. m.

Press Bldg. Opp. Maj

'. ' ,: _ ,

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I

-iplomti1c Diction in Berlin '

HOTEL A L)LON, BERLIN, GERMANY

i

A TILETICS FOR ALL
The Union has stated it will have
a billiard tournament. They are fol-
lowing out the policy of athletics for
all. It seems that all these who do
not play on Varsity teams and did not
enter the bridge tournament will havo
an opportunity to exercise in the new
contest.
THERNE MAY iE a match between
the winner of the bridge nlay and the

T Wo German diplomats, who had
been at theUniversi tyof Bonn to-
geth er, met in the foyer of the Hotel
Adlon after a separation of some years.
One of them had been at a South Amer-
ican capital,one in the Orient.
Eagerly they discussed old times and
conmmIflonl memllorles, and they were still
talking eNCitedly as they started to-
ward the Otis Elevator. When they
reached the door, they paused, each
wishing to give the other precedence.
"But you must go first, my good
friend,"one of them was heard to re-
mark."I'm sure the ride will be a nov-
elty to you after so mny years in the
Last, antdl would not think of preced-
-ncy om "

"On the contrary," answered the
other,"I am insisting that you enter
first. We lacked some things in the Or-
ent, but the Otis, there as here,is in all
the big shops and hotels."" We'd better
squeeze in together, then, because South
America, too, is well equipped ! But
wait a moment! You must go first, for
I used the Otis on board the steamer
every day!""I, too! I will not be out-
done!"
Starting forward together, they col-
lided at the door.
One would have to travel farther
than civilization,East or West, to find
any novelty in that taken-for-granted
Convenience, the Otis Elevator.

Elie Herndon Kearns
in a single bill-Ibsen's "Hedda
Gabbler."
As featured artist with the summer
season of the Players, and a member
of the Ben Greet Players of some
.ym ago, Miss Kearns is known
locally, while as Walter Hampden'sj

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