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February 16, 1928 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1928-02-16

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

!r-r5THUSAY. FEBRUPTARY 16.,1928

TT'TL MICLLA T)AT - S A. .C **ti'..d * LL"A..L*1..++

i l : X AU L111. v XXXt, i LV, lx7 tf9

34

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
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The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
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creditedin this paperand the local news pub-
lished herein.
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Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
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Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITUR
JO H. CHAMBERLIN
Editor.....................Ellis B. Merry
Editor Michigan Weekly.. Charles E. Behymer
Staff' Editor............... Philip C. Brooks
City Editor............Courtland C. Smith
Women's Editor........... Marian L. Welles
Sports Editor............. Herbert, E. Vedder
Theater, Books and Music.Vincent C. Wall, Jr.
Telegraph Editor............Ross W. Ross
Assistant City Editor.... Richard C. Kurvink
Night Editors
Robert E. Finch G. Thomas McKean
- Stewart Hooker Kenneth G. Patrick
aul J. Kern Nelson J. Smith, Jr.
Milton Kirshbaum
Reporters.
Esther Anderson Marion McDonald
Margaret Arthur Richard H. Milroy
Emmons A. Bonfield Charles S. Monroe
Jean Campbell Catherine Price
Jessie Church Harold L. Passman
Clarence N. Edelson Morris W. Quinn
Margaret Gross Rita Rosenthal
Valborg Egeland Pierce Rosenberg
Mar orie Follmer Edward . Ryan
James B. Freeman David Scheyer
RoetJ. Gessner Eleanor Scribner
Elaine E. Gruber Corinne Schwarz
Alice Hagelshaw Robert G. Silbar
Joseph E. Howell Howard F. Simon
J. Wallace Hushen Rowena Stillman
Charles R. Kaufman Sylvia Stone
William F. Kerby George Tilley
Lawrence R. Klein Edward I. Warner, Jr.
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John H. Maloney
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
WILLIAM C. PUSCH
Assistant Manager...George H. Annable, Jr.
Advertising ...............Richard A. Meyer
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Circulation ............. George B. Ahn, Jr.
Publication...........e...y Tal
Assistants

George Bradley
Marie Brummeler
James Carpenter
Charles K. Correll
Barbara Cromell
Mary Dively
Bessie V. Egeland
Una Felker
KatherineFrohne
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Helen Gross
1. J. Hammer
Carl WV. Hammer

Ray Hofelich
Hal A. Jaehn
James Jordan
Marion Kerr
Thales N. Lenington
Catherine McKinven
Dorothy Lyons
Alex K. Scherer
George Spater
Ruth Thompson
Herbert E. Varnum
Lawrence Walkley
Hannah Wallen

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 1928
Night Editor - ROBERT E. FINCH
THE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE
The University college, the plans
for which have been adopted by the
general committee on the matter and
which will likely be ratified by the
Regents and the faculties of the vari-
ous schools and colleges, comprises
one of the most interesting experi-
mental educational steps taken by any
American university in recent years.
In brief, the new plan provides for
the regimenting of the entire fresh-
men and sophomore classes now in
the literary, engineering, architect-
ural, and other colleges into one large
group. In the organization thus pro-
vided, it offers an opportunity to deal
in one mass with many of the prob-
lems of the early years of the Uni-
versity-a unique situation compared
with the plan whose place it takes.
In the broader view, nevertheless;
the whole system is not as revolu-
tionary as it sounds, for, contrary to
the original idea of the University
college, the organization will not pos
sess an independent faculty, and wil l
not lead an entirely independent ex-
istence from the other schools and col-
leges on the campus.
In fact, it stands as an almost in-
congruous unit, being only a compo-
sition of the first two years of some of
the professional schools and the first
two years .of"the literary college. As
the plan was adopted, the engineering
and architectural colleges will come
into the new organization with their
present professional curricula un-
changed.
Depending on the course which the
executive board of the new University
college will take, the recently adopted
plan may be a radical or a less radi-
cal step. At its one extreme it pre-
sents an aspect not so far different
from our present system, except that
it is much more complicated. At its
other extreme, it presents the aspect
of a revolutionary change in educa-
tional fields, with the introduction of
the two year comprehensive examina-
tion, the group system of personal
faculty contacts, the psychological
study of students fob placement, and
the segregation of sexes in classes all
as possibilities.
Probably in matters of personnel'
and standards, the new organization
will permit the greatest benefits.. Of
curricula, the greatest progress can

plan, then, is not its present nature,
which is practically harmless, but its
flexibility allowing almost any lengths
in experimental education.nAs a gi-
gantic laborator;, to test new educa-
tional theories, the University college
will doubtless prove the most striking
"proving ground" for educational
theories that the country has ever
known. As an actual plan, however,
as sketched in the reports adopted
Tuesday, the new college is very lit-
tle different from our present system.
FAITH AND HOPE
Resolutions adopted during the last
few days by the Detroit Pastors' union
included one registering a strong pro-
test against a "big navy" program
which would involve the building of
more vessels of war. Like most such
documents, this one dealt wholly in
abstracts, declaring it a great mis-
take for Congress to authorize any
such program, as it would be pre-
judicial to the desire for peace both
home and abroad.
It is only in keeping with past per-
formances that such a resolution
should take the form of a petition,
signed by 150 ministers of the gospel,
studied neither in the arts of defense
and war nor in those of economics,
accompanied by no exact definition
of what the "big navy" program
means to them. The idea of any such
program seems to be a sort of eternal
bugaboo for pacifists and faith-ped-
dlers.
Much more in keeping are the words
of Edward E. Spafford, commander
of the American Legion, which were
being delivered at the same minute
that the resolution was being drawn
up, decrying the ill-effects that came
from the disarmament conference of
1924. Spafford pointed out that as
a result of that agreement the United
States destroyed 800,000 tons of the
finest war vessels it owned-more,
than had ever been lost in conflict--
and at the same time Britain and Ja-
pan had destroyed but 300,000 and
180,000 tons respectively, and that
made up of mostly obsolete and de-
crepit ships. The legion believes not
in militarism, because it has experi-
enced its effects at first hand, but
neither does it believe in waste and
unpreparedness.
If the United States could main-
tain a carefully proportioned means
of defense, consistently up-to-date, it
would be well prepared to meet any
emergency, it would have less diffi-
culty in sponsoring disarmament; it
would suffer less comparatively from
disarmament, and would save millions
in the end. In brief, it is a matter of
consistent efficiency and foresightt
against alternating pacificism and
militarism, as well as the cycle of
poor and well-maintained defense.
AN APPRECIATION
In the death of Fr. Michael Patrickt
Bourke, chaplain of the Catholic Stu-
dents' Chapel, Ann Arbor and those
with whom Fr. Bourke was associat-
ed, have suffered great loss. Dur-
ing the past 15 years in which n
served as director of Catholic student
activities, Fr. Bourke made a host of
friends to whom his death can cause
nothing but regret and intense sorrow.
After attaining eminence in the
field of law and theology, Fr. Bourke
entered the priesthood and was di-
rectly responsible for the erection of
St. Mary's Chapel, which was dedi-
cated in 1925.
In his work among the students,1
Father Bourke has wielded tremend-t
ous influence for good in the lives oft
those with whom he has come in con-I

tact. In all his endeavors he has wonI
and maintained the highest respect'
and commendation for his sympathy'
and insight.
THE WIZARD .
Thomas A. Edison, at 81, is stillt
moving along with face forward and
without much thought of pausing longc
enough to count the mile-posts he hast
passed. On the occasion of his birth-
day the other day 4,000 Florida school
children turned out to pay him horn-
age.
While it is trite to elaborate on hisi
contributions to the cause of scientific
and world progress, it is significant
that Edison's period of usefulness isI
Lrot yet ended. Too often the worldf
waits until a man dies before it ex-f
presses its appreciation of what he E
has done. Not so in the case of Edi-
son. He is still a wizard.
Latest indications are that, in the
race depicting the solution of educa-c
tional problems, President Little isr
still two theories and one regulation
ahead of President Glenn Frank of
Wisconsin.
Word comes that a 65-year-old wo-
nan has enrolled as a freshman in E
the University of Arkansas to study d
ournalism. It in to be loned that the I t

AROUNTED
WII THE CLOSING of the old
Arboretum to all students after sun
set, many enrolled in the University
are bending their efforts to devise
some means of entering the sanctuary.
ONE, WHO DOES NOT wish to dis-
close his name writes:
"Of course fences have been climbed.
The popularity of the co-ed en-
rolled in Physical Education is now
assured. Also this ought to be con-
ducive to developing some pole vault-
ers for Steve Farrell."
s * s
THE SAME CONTRIBUTOR de-
scribes an arboretum thus:
"A hot-bed of immorality. Some,
thing college students must shun.
Free admission to all Boy Scouts."
* * *
PERSONALLY WE WONDER if
there is going to be an enforcement
officer and if special permits will be
granted for extraordinary and unus-
ual reasons.
* s*
ANOTHER STUDENT HAS raised
the question: "What if you are inside
just before sun set and can't get out?"
It would seem that in this instance
a student would be guilty of a viola-
tion of something or other and would
probably go without dinner.
. * .
OF COURSE THIS demonstrates a
simple method of getting around the
gates. Just take a lunch basket and
go inside, then when the gates are
closed you are there. What more
could anyone ask?
I F ,
COWS MAY WHISTLE
Dear Jeb:
This morning's mouse story must
have reminded lots of us of the old
bear story, but for the benefit of the
younger generation, I, with your per
mission will retell it.
Two old friends were having a re-
union in a well known Detroit hotel
one night and were imbibing with
reckless disregard of wood alcohol.
About one A. M. the night clerk was
aroused by the appearance of one of
them in the lobby screaming for an
ambulance. In response to inquiry he
replied that his friend had gone crazy.
"How do you know?" asked the
clerk.
"Why, mister," he says, "there ain't
no bears in our room."
"Well what of that, there aren't
any bears in your room."
"There ain't, say, are you crazy,
too, that room is plumb full o' bears!"
Of course mice may sing, but-
Poison Ivy.
* * *
WE WISH TO TAKE this opportun-
ity to offer the space in this column
to any methods which may be devised
for getting around the gates.
.*s
THE GUARDIAN
00 /
00
00
The gentleman pictured above hias
been engaged to stand at the gates,
the Lovenot Gates, and wave away all
those who wish to enter. The poet
Dante has written an inscription to b

placed above the Lovenot Gates:
"ABANDON ALL HOPE, YE WHO EN-
TER HERE."
THE INTERFRATERNITY Council
made a grave mistake yesterday. After
trying to get a quorum for the last
week or so they managed to find
enough fraternity men hanging around
the Union to have a meeting.
* * *
THEY ELECTED A new president,
a man who will come into office withi
great enthusiasm and will leave it
with even greater enthusiasm.
* * *
THIS SAME FRATERNITY body is
planning a bridge tournament for the
fraternity men. No doubt they feel
that the poor fellows are not getting
enough exercise and a little inter-
house competition will build up the
boys.
* * *
IT IS UNDERSTOOD that several
of the houses have entered into inten-
sive training with great emphasis be-
ing placed on signals.
EXECUTIVE BOARD MEETS
ANN ARBOR, MICH., FEB. 15.-At
a meeting held late last night Rolls ,
Executive board voted to place a can-;
didate. in the field for president of
he United States.

THEATER
BOOKS
MUSIC
TONIGHT: The Rockford Players
present Bernard Shaw's "Great Cath-
erine" and Barrie's "The Old Lady
Shows Her Medals" in a double bill
in the Whitney theater at 8 o'clock.
TONIGHT: The Chicago Civic
Opera company presents "La Giocon-
da" in the Masonic auditorium in De-
troit at 8:15 o'clock. (The other per-
formances include 'Madame Butter.
fly," on Friday evening; "Carmen" at
the Saturday matinee; and I Trova-
tore" on Saturday evening.)
* * *
"THE HOMETOWNERS"
The Mimes theater has been dark
this week, due to the fact that "The
Hometowners" show which opens
next Monday is now in rehearsal. This
is a Cohan show, and all that that im-
plies, and was primarily chosen to fill
in the gap until "The Beggar on
Horseback" is ready for production.
Later in the season they are planning
on both a Shaw and an O'Neill-prob-
ably "The Devil's Disciple" and per-
haps "Desire Under the Elms," al-
though this last play is tremendously
difficult, and may not be attempted.
All this to more or less excuse the
presence of the Cohan comedy. Mr.
Cohan's classic theater which ranges
from "Seven Keys to- Baldpate" to
"The Merry Malones"-his latest mu-
sical comedy-occupies a definite
niche in the classification of Ameri-
can drama. But abcut the most that
can be said for it is that a Cohan
show usually plays well. But as a
part of the dramatic achievement and
value of the year's program, "The
Hometowners" draws down the cel-
lar position-and this really is bad
when you consider that it rates this,
when "Seventh Heaven," "The Bad
Man" and "Dulcy" are on the list.
A TARKINGTON SHOW
Booth Tarkington's "Clarence" is
another innocent comedy of American
home life-sweet, simple and girlish,
and when well done it possesses a
definitely humorous value. It is as
thoroughly native and wholesome as
"Huckleberry Finn or Pumpkin pie,"
as one critic remarked. Florence
Dade has the Helen Hayes part, Rob-
ert Henderson in the Glenn x Hilter.
role, Kate Holland Patton ins )another
Mary Boland part, and Charles War-
burton is going to do Clarence.
* * *
"THE BRIDGE OF SAN LOUIS
REY," by Thornton Wilder. Albert
and Charles Boni, New York; 1927;
To find a book that cuts so deeply
into the mystery called Life written
with such charming and unique sim-
plicity as Thornton Wilder achieves
in recounting this tale about the col-
lapse of the bridge of San Louis Rey
is an event which inevitably dazzles.
Realists have set up for their aim truth
about life, and it has been marvelled
at; but here is truth about the soul,
and the reactionary, intensive marvel-
ling is likely to take the form of re-
flective muteness as the only means
of satisfaction. For life in a world
of love is the zenith of Wilder's ideal-
ism, being in itself excuse enough for
living.
"The Bridge of San Louis Rey" is

not a novel, it is not even primarily a
story. It is a philosophical treat-
ment of Fate, of Love, and of Char-
acter. It is a series of tales that stir
the mind and ultimately result in
happy fantasy and an enjoyment of
thought plus sympathetic understand-
ing.
There should be no question as to
why this work is proving so im-
mensely popular, for it is a rarity of
the most uncommon form. Wilder's
style is that of a man who thinks
clearly and finely, and who clothes
his processes and conclusions in di-
rectness. There is no ostensible at-
tempt on his part to compose well
sounding phrases, to carry details of
a picture to the mind with any great
degree of minuteness. The lives of
five fated characters, in the fascina-
tion of old Peru, are unfolded by a
style that is sheer and delicate be-
cause of its splendid simplicity.
From the deaths of these five people
can be drawn great lessons, though
there is not a single word of preach-
ing or dogmatic analysis in the book.
This is left for the minutes after that
first sigh which inadvertently ac-
companies the finishing of the last
page. In essence each new thought
conveyed is an immense stimulant,4
and in totality protrudes ideas of
truly superior merit.
Trhisconmbinatin of infrnsie.. f

TYPEWRITER
REPAIRTNG
All makes of ma-
chines. Our equip-
mient and personnfel
Is considered among
the best In the state. The result of
t'wenty years' careful building.
O. D. MORR I LL;
17 Nickels Arcade. Phone 6615.
....................
Detroit Theaters
"" """=" "

..

CAS S THEATREE
LAST 2 WEEKS
Wednesday Mat... $1.00 to $2.50
]Eves. ............ $1.00 to $3.50
More Appealing and Interesting
the Oftener You See It
SCHWAB & MANDEL'S
"GOOD NEWS"

Why do you say of one person:
"She always looks nice"-
And of another:
"She could look nice"-?
They may spend the same amount of money on clothes,
but the first spends time and energy besides. The second
does not.

..

1:-

Woodward, at Eliot
B 0 N S T E L L E
PLAYHOUSE
NIGHTS, 75c, $1.50. Mats. Tues.,
Thurs. and Sat., 50c, 75c
I Recommend
"THE DEVIL- IN THE
CHEESE"
By Tom Cushing

11

THE RUBLEY SHOPPE
Nickels Arcade

SERVICEI

rj

I,

.,..

..:

Shubert-Lafayette
PRICES: Nights, Orchestra, $2,
$2.50. Balcony, "Wc to $2. Thurs-
day and Saturday Matinee, 50c
to $1.50.
GEORGE JESSEL
(HIMSELF)
In "THE JAZZ SINGER.'

Now is the time to buy a

I

How Will You
Pay Expenses
Next Year?
Several hundred college men
solved their tuition problems
this year through the money-
making opportunity offered
by the Scholarship Depart-
ment of GOOD HOUSE-
KEEPING and COSMO-
POLITAN Magazines. A
liberal salary, bonuses and
extra awards are available to
any man who wants work
during the summer vacation.
Positions as salesmen and
team captains are still open
for men in your college.
If you are interested
in malting money next
summer call and see or
write for particulars to
J. HAYDEN, District
Manager, 514 Lafayette
Building, Detroit, Mich.

Rider

We are the Authorized
Dealers for
TheNew
Royal
Portable
Typewriter
Just think of what this
means.
Although in the field
one year this portable
outsold for Nov. and Dec.
all other makes. Come in,
let us show you why.

made right here in Ann
Arbor, guaranteed a.ad
serviced by the makers
without delay.
It is a much better pen
than you can buy else-
where. You need the best
in your school work, and
it will last a lifetime.

"WHO'S PLAYING?"
Spring Parties-Open House-Crowds Swaying
--and-
"THE BUCCANEERS"
The Ideal for All House Parties
CALL
LOUIS FREDERICK PHILLIPPI
Booking Manager
DIAL 4418

7

Rider's 'Pen Shop
PHOliE 8950
SERVICES ,

r

7777=

.~

The Daily Classifieds Are
Read at the Beginning of
the Business Day

HE Daily Classifieds are read when they are the
most effective-at the beginning of the business
day. The Daily reaches the readers at the time when
they are starting to look for rooms, positions, or busi-
ness opportunities.

I

R ESUL TS from Daily Classifieds are quick and
sure because they reach whom you want to reach
at the time that you want to reach them. The Daily
reaches more than ten thousand readers each morning.
That is why Daily Classifieds are such a good invest-
ment. Daily Classified Contracts reduce the cost 'almost
half.
BRING OR PHONE YOUR ADS TO
mHT_ /T UTPT- A XT fl A TT N

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