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February 14, 1928 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-02-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, : PEBRUARY 14, 1928

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREN

CANADAN MIISTES PAYVISI 'Gats Cosing.2,000.EGI.RA.IN.FO

OAECVYOUNGST ER GAINS
OANIE \usC \SCIENTIFIC HONORS

SDebateLeague Mails
Fn al-A nnouncement,

C AN ADI AN MINIST ERS P AY VISI T! Gates, Casting $2,000k EGIST R A TION FOR
TO PRESIDENT AT WHITE HOUSEo Close Arboretum TOURNEY CLOSES
1AIlv s Aer b oreEtat
" a u7 ^ t r s ne Registatonfor h bridge tourna-

MIGHT REJECT JESUS
TODAYROYDErN SAYS
HILL AUDITORIUM IS FILLED
TO CAPACITY TO HEAR
ENGLISH W OMAN
REILAND TO APPEAR NXT
"Jesus Is The Man That All Of I's
Would Be If We Could,"
Asserts Lecturer
"If Jesus Christ were to come to
the United States today the organiz-
ed churches might cast him out, bu
{,! .{ Ic oil:d hear hirv,"
said Maude Royden in her address at
the first o-* the Spring series of con-
vocations Sunday morning in Hill
auditorium. "For it was to the com-
mon people that he appealed. And it
i§ the same appeal that calls to us
today. Jesus was a man serene, grac-
ious and full of power, and we do
not do ourselves an injustice in any
age when we respond to such quali-
ties as these. n.
"Whether or not Jesus was God
or the Christ is of little importance

A . , ....u..,._ ,.

Floyd Soule
Who has so distinguished himself
as a scientist since being graduated
from Ripon &llege, Ripon, Wis., five
years ago, that he has been included
among seven of the foremost physi-
cists to study magnetic conditions on
the earth's surface. Soule leaves
New York in May on a three years
cruise to the Antarctic on the Car-
negie, only non-magnetic ship afloat.

Concerning Contests
The last bulletin before the first
debate in the elimination series was
sent out from the offices of the Mich-
igan High School Debating league
yesterday by Prof. Gail E. Densmore,'
manager of the league. The announce-
ment was sent only to the 64 high
schools selected from the 240 mem-
bers of the organization to participate
in the final series of contests to de-
termine the state champion.
As previously announced, the date
of the first debate in the elimination
series is Friday, Feb. 17. Heretofore
in the preliminary contests, debates
were allowed to be held one day after
the scheduled time upon the definitej
agreement of the two schools con-
cerned. In the elimination series,
however, all the contests must be
held at the scheduled time because
the debates will be held at intervals
of every two weeks and a postpone-
ment of any one debate would peNi-
alize the rest of the schools.
In the preliminary contests each
member of the debating league took
part in four debates, two affirmative
and two negative. In this final series
the sides and the debate locations are
assigned according to the stated pref-
erence of the schools as far as pos-
sible. When two teams paired in de-
bate request the same side, the allot-
ment of sides is made by tossing a
coin, and the school losing the toss
for sides is arbitrarily awarded its
choice of debate location. Because of
this reason every school that survives
any contest in the elimination series
must be ready to debate either the
affirmative or the negative.
This year the Michigan High School
Debating league, which is a branch of
the extension department of the Uni-
versity ,is inaugurating a new policy
of sending out official balllots and
also cards suggesting to the judges
upon what points they should decide
a debate. This debate score card
suggests five points or judging a
forensic contest. These are: analysis
of case, evidence, argument, rebuttal,
and delivery.

Tw thousand dollars worth of orna-
mental gates has been appropriated
for the Geddes avenue entrance to
Nichol's Arboretum, says Information-
recently conveyed by the Regents to
Eli A. Gallup, park superintendent.
The gates, it is explained, will be
closed daily at sundown, according
to an agreement between University
officials and members of the Ann Ar-
bor park board.
It was felt in some circles last
night that this ban on arboretums,
coming after the ban on automobiles,:
was anticlimactic in nature, but the
Regents perhaps feel that enough are
still being persuaded to walk out
there to warrant closing this .radi-
tional den of Michigan amorisms. A
very real danger to student welfare
may lurk in the reflection of the
moon's subtle radiance on the Huron's
murky slime.
It could not be ascertained definite-
ly at a late hour last night whether
or not state troopers would be hired
to keep couples from slipping across
the boundaries at unprotected points
after sundown, but it was unofficially
rumored that the cost of such en-
forcement would be prohibitive. The
Regents, have, however, provided in
their appropriation for a second set of
gates at the River road entrance to
} the arboretum.

r

noon S'aturday and matching of the
compeing teans has been made. The
pairings were posted on the bulletin
board at the Union yesterday and
p~lay geban at 3 o'clock.
Members of the committee in charge
will call the contestants and inform
them of 'ithe tme at which 'their
matcht s will tae played. An elimina-
tion series will be held to decide the
winners and cups will -be awarded to
each of the pair as well as to each of
the pair of runners-up.
..ibrary Enlarged
Due to the removal of the eofo
and surveying departments frrm wt
quarters in the west book tack wn
the Library is makin _ , a'ruo .en
to absorb the spac+ Is inten
tion to move the Library Sciioi 11<
to this room.
TYPEWRITING and
MIMEOGRAPIllIN(
a speclalt) for
twenty years
Prompt Service, Experienced )Oper,
ators, Moderate Rates.
0. D. MORRILL
17 Nickels Arcade. Phlone; 6$1'

Sir Robert Borden, left, former prime minister of Canada, and Vincenti
Massey, Canadian minister to the UIited States, arle snapped after calling
upon President Coolidge during a visit to Washingtoni.
LANPHIER LECTURE IS POSTPONED

in general. The world turns to himn
as a man of surpassing beauty and JOURNALISM DEPARTMENT
strength. His importance to the TREES NEW EXPERIMENTS
world is shown by the conditions
which surrojunded his life and his
era.W t t tIn an interesting experiment car-
ea.d Whtwstaturthanhemust have tied out last semester by students of
had and how important he must have ted class in eleets of ournalism,
been to the world df that time tot
have had the entire era and the time a beginning course in the Department
to came dated from his birth." of Journalism, news and feature
Miss oyden then went on to de- stories written by members of the
velop her theme ten whe resentment class were published in the Washte-
that is shown th Jesus in the world naw County Tribune and the Ann Ar-
and that was shown to him at: the bor Daily News. two local papers. By
tim'e of his crucifiixion is the treat- the end of the semester the students
ment that the world gives to all of had written and published material
meas.urmin nearly 500c olumn mchPs

In view of the fact that Maj. Thom-
as Lanphier has been ordered to win-
ter maneuvers in the northern part
of the state, he will be unable to ad-
dress the Chamber of Commerce noon
day luncheon today. The meeting has
been postponed until a week later,
Feb. 21, when the major will be able

Ito speak. His address will be on air-
port activities.
The program on that day will deal
entirely with airports and all citizens
interested in the proposed Ann Arbor
airport project are invited to attend.
Major Lanphier flew into the city
Friday and inspected the Steere farm
property with Lient. Leoimrd Flox.

n..

C 3Y5Pf . TYR .-",m

its great leaders. "Jesus," she said.
"is the man that all of us wouldc
be it we could. But the vision is so
fair above what we can achieve. ands
yet runs in such an unforgettab
way in our minds, that we wish thy i
we had never seen or beard this
gospel of the sublime.
"It is when we are beginning to,
wish that some great call had not.
come, and when. we begin to resentr
the height of the achievement thatd
we are seeking that we are well on
the way to crying 'Crucify him' just b
as the crowd did with Christ," MissF
Royden said in developing her themes
of the eternal resentment to a mightyI
power.T
"But even to the end," she said, inc
conclusion, 'Christ was the gambler.
and before the setting of the sun.'
after he had thrown his life intot
the scales, he knew that he had won'
and that the cause was advanced."
Miss Royden's address broke allC
records for religious gatherings ine
Ann Arbor, every seat in Hill audi-d
to)riumr being filled before she begant
to talk. l
l
DENVER CITIZENS
DEDICATE FIELD
TO BROWN LOWRY
An aviation field in Denver has
been named for a former Michigan
alumnus. Lowry field, dedicated re-
cently in the memory of Francis
Brown Lowry, '17, who was killed in
service in France, will immortalize
the memory of the aviator, by a
bronze statue.
Mrs. Lois Curry McMillan, wife of
a school-day chum of Lieutenant
Lowry, is the sculptress of the me-
morial. The bronze will be four feet
high and will depict the Michigan flier
in pilot uniform with helmet pushed a
up on forehead and wearing the of-
ficial flying clothes of the aviation
service. The statue will be placed
above a fireplace in the officer's club
at Lowry field, and beneath it will be
inscribed in silver the citation ac-
companying his Distinguished Service
Cross:
"Lieutenant Francis Lowry of the
Ninety-first Aero Suadron is awarded
a medal for extraordinary heroism in
action. While on a photographical
mission, Lieutenant Lowry was har-
assed by German anti-aircraft guns.
"A shellmade a direct hit on his
plane, instantly killing Lowry."

11u5llg 1 ly DVUcU11 lcie '
cuts and headlines not being counted
in this total.
The greatest number of printed
stories wag written by Earl J. Hilli-
gan, '30, who had 15 stories published
n both papers for a total of 129
irinh1 c .

i
tf
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4g,
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1 .
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in
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6

PRICES=

Matinees
10c, 300, 10c

Ni itp htf

NOW SHOWING
I:30-3:30-7:00-8:40

C~v , ~uztet ield C~fja e " s.

:
4,.

lE AMPAD GERTRUDE E
AND CO.
"WILL TAKE YOU ROUND TOWN"

inches.
Another experiment was. conducted
by the same class in elements ofj
ournalism, in which the studentsj
read, as required exercises, seven
daily newspapers of the United States.
At the end of the semester, the mem-
bers of this class voted on the news-
papers which they preferred from the
standpoint of interest to them. Tabu-
ations of the results showed that the
New York, Times was preferred to the
other papers studied by a large ma-
jority, the Chicago Tribune being sec-
ond, and the New York Evening Post
third.
CAMBRIDGE-Undergraduates at
Cambridge, "bored stiff," have start-
d a lively campaign against what is
described as the "insipidity and ut-
ter uselessness" of the ordinary col-
ege lecture to which they have to
isten.

First-Class
Shoe
Repairing
Expert Workmanship
CLARK'S SHOE
REPAIRER
321 South State

I

Also.
Floyd Hofmann
On the
GRANDE ORGAN
Presenting
"May or December
TRAVELING AT ROME
jichigan Novelty
KARL WIEDERHOLD'S
MICHIGAN ORCHESTRA

ON THE
SCREEN
X
Fk

flavcred love and love put
full blown rose, as colorful
the Golden West!

tae spe
as a KNew

Xt in ~t "n1ri A, tli'illiii: as ia
Vorh! igcIa-.- as gicloos as

With

MARY ASTOR--GILBEr ROLAND
Thur.-"Discovery Night" and "Bod n o

Coming-MIDWINTER FROLICS
re Pullman confidences safe? See Norman Shearer in "The Latest
From Paris."

Hs A T E R
NOW SHOWING
"9IWINNINGf
WORTH"D
from the nvdblyHIA4OLD BELL WRIGHTi
with RONALD COLMAN
and VILMA BANIKY
No Need to Tell You Why You Should See this Picture-
It Speaks for Itself
STORY BY HAROLD BELL WRIGHT
Interpreted By
RONALD COLEMAN-VILMA BANKY

r

. - ' I

I

IN

i NT! "

'f :

I

IA RLYIA LLION MEN HAVE
C0ANGED TO CH ESTERFIELD
~f

AND HER ES WHfY:
E STATE it as -our honest
belief that the tobaccos used in
Chesterfield cigarettes are of
finer qulity and hence of better
taste than in any other cigarette
at the price.

THEY SATISFY
and yet THE'RE MILD

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