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February 14, 1928 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-02-14

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ESTABLISHED
1890

g

lap
4L496F
JLI

II

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. XXXVII, No. 99. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1928

EIGHT PAGES

ANNUAL C0NFERENCE PROFESSOR SEEKS TO DEVELOP
MUSICAL TENDENCIES IN MICE

OF HIGHWAY EXPEB
TO OPEN HERE TODAY
CONVENTION HAS BEEN hELD
HERE EVERY YEAR
SINCE 1915

IS FOURTEENTH MEETING
Little Will Speak At Smoker Tonight;
Gov. Green Will Address
(rathing 'ThlUrsdlay
Holding its jjour leeunth annual
meeting, the Michigan Conference on
Highway Engineering opens today in
room 348 West Engineering building.
This conference, which has been heldI
at the University every year since
1915, brings together highway engin-j
eers and county commissioners from
practically every county in the state
of M\lichig-an, and althougi the total
attendance last year was in)re than
600, the indications are that it will
be still larger.this year.
There are many features ci note
on the program for the conference.
Giov. Fred \V. GIreen will speak at
the annual dinner of the Michigan
11ighway engineering conferenc-e on
Feb. 16. Presih+nt jClarence Cook
Little will address a smoker tonight
i the banquet hall o0 the Uniion. The
program of th techm-que sessions
includes many engineers and other
speakers of national prominence from
various parts of the country.
1,ong Program AIrranged
The partial progi'am for the con-
ference, which continues through
Friday noon, Feb. 17, is as follows:
'Tuesday, Feb. 14, 10 o'clock in the
morning: registration, and inspection
of the highway laboratoiries and other
engineering laboratories and librar-
ies.
Tuesday, Feb. 14, 1:30 o'clock in

i

Do mice sing?
This is not a catch examination
question from freshmen zoology, nor
even a subject of investigation, for
mice do sing---and what is more the
University, in the laboratory of Prof.
Lee 17. Dice, possesses some of the
operatic little beasts.
Of course not every mouse sings,
and even in the most exclusive fam-
ilies of inging mice, only a few
reach vof.al hrIghts. It was a very
plain little mouse in Detroit, never-
theless, which originated the strain,
and since his descendants have been
reared in the laboratories here, large
numbers of them have exhibited
musical tendencies.
Abcut three years ago a man by
the name of Clark, in Detroit, -sought
to exterminate a certain mouse which
POSTPONES ELCTION

had been troubling his environs.
When about to commit the deadly act
he was attracted by a queer clear
muscial note, and discovering that
there were no canaries in the room
decided that it. must be his mouse.
(The singing is somewhat similar toI
that of a bird-being clear and not at
all squeaky.)
Later the mouse was sent to the
university here to be inve'stigated, and
though it refused to sing when con-
fined in a cage in President Little's
living room, its concerts were fre-
quent and entertaining in more ordin-
ary surroundings. At the ripe old age
of 18 months the musical mouse
passrd away, not, however, without
leaving some 1,800 descendants for
subsequent investigation (mice, it
seems, have a penchant for large
familites.)
Of these descendants, not all sing,
but by careful pruning Professor Dice
hopes to develop a strain in which all
members will be vocal artists. Thus
far his investigations have not gone
far enough to determine what success

EDARSPROPHESIES
OVE HOOVER IN OHIO1
MEREDITH INTRODUCES NEWTON
BAKER AS ANTI-SMITH
DRY CANDIDATE

it
'

HIGH BUDGET IS EXPECTED
Senate Considers Bill To Investigate
Finance Og Publc Utility
Power Companies
(By Associated Press.)
WASHINGTON, Feb. 13-Congress
droned away at its legislative job
today with flickers - of presidential
campaign sheet lightning playing
around the edges off the proceedings.
It may have been a -reaction to the
formal launching in Ohio of the
Hoover boom, at least, that prompted
a statement by Senator Edwards, of
.ew Jersey, predicting that a Re-
publican split would give the Buck-
eye state to the Democrats in No-

THIRTY-TWO LITERARY SCHOOLSOLVERINES DEFEAI
STUDENTS ATTAIN 'A' RECORDS

Achieving scholastic perfection for
a semester's work is the accomplish-
ment of 32 students in the College of
Literature, Science and the Arts, ac-
eroding to the list of students who
received all A's, announced last night
by the recorder of the college. On this
list there are two seniors who have
just completed seven straight semes-
tert of work with A's in all of the
courses they have taken.
The list as announced is as follows:
Ruth E. Banfield, '28; Marjorie R.
Bettler, '30; William W. Bishop, '28;
Maurice S. Brown, '30; Catherine
Chase, '30; Eleanor A. Cooke, '31;
Edith V. Egeland, '28; Isaac S. Fried-
man, '31; Richard C. Fuller, '28; Hugh
A. Fulton, '30; Eugene A. Hand, '30;
Lawrence E. Hartwig, '31; Mary G.
Jenkins, '29; Agnes E. Johnson, '31;
Tom H. Mack, '28; Ruth Mandelker,
'31; Daniel W. Myers,'29; Victor E.
Nelson, '29; Harold A. Ott, '28;;
Charles E. Palmer, '29; William B.
Palmer, '29; Orsamus M. Pearl, '29;
Harold Pliskow, '30; Abigail Ratliff,
'28; Joseph Ricklin, '31; Gilbert B.I
Saltonstall, '30; Catherine D. Scholl,
'29; Robert G. Surridge, '29; Sher-
wood Waldron, '28; Mary Louise
LEGION LAL[IDS YOST;

-he is having; but singing ,as a
Arrange Bridge Tournament In Order "mousal' trait, is an established fact;
To Promote CloserI Relatliois and who knows but what some day in
Among Fraternities the future, matronly housewives will
buy Michigan's Singing Alice in place
COMMITTEES APPOINTED ofcanaries.
Election of a president of the Inter-
fraternity council was postponed fori SOU H

vember.
The appearance before

a

House

.,. nn..-..a4.. .. ,. 1' 1:17._____ f'n T.T_.l_.li T_ t _1

he prcsent at a meeting of the coun-
cil held yesterday at the Union. Group
four of the division of fraternities is
to cIle(t the new presidient. This
group is composed of fraternities. A
meeting will be held today to elect the
new executive.
The election of a new president was
made necessary by the graduation of
Wayne Schroder, '28, presiding of-
ficer of the council, who completed his
studies at the end of last term. He

IN DYING__CONDITION

committee or wi '1' .iededith, Wil-
son administration secretary of ag-
riculture, gave place for a. little ac- INCOLN BAN
tion in the Democratic pre-conven- '.
tion skirmishing. Meredith said in Syafiord Presents Citation
an interview that he was not a cand- Cal, hliimi lGreatest Ann
iate and grit forward his formes'!r- ~-

To Yost,
Arbor

I

the afternoon: I. E. Riggs, profes- will not be on the campus during the
sor of civil engineering, will preside. present semester, thus making an
Hl. S. Mattimore, engineer & c iater- election necessary. Edward Wachs,
fals, Pennsylvania State Highway de- '29, presided over the meeting yester-
partment, Iairisburg, Pennsylvania, day.
will sneak on "Field Control of Pave- ay.
ilent Concrete," C. N. Connor, of the Ccnnmmittees were appointed by
Highway Research board, Washing- Wachs to arrange an interfraternity
ton, D. C., will speak on "Low Cost bridge tournament to bring about a
Improved Roads." F. C. Lang, who- closer relationship among the organ-
is an associate professor of highway izations on the campus. Two mem-
engineering at the University of Min- bers from each fraternity will be
nesota and engineer cF tests and in- selected by competition to represent
spection in the Minnesota State"- heirfraternity in the final contests.
Highway department, will speak con- A letter from the Board of Regents
cerning "Bituminous- Treatments of i n swer to the recent petition drawn
Gravel Roads and Earth Subgrades." Ip by the Interfraternity council ask-
Tuesday, Feb. 14, 7:30 o'clock in ing that the auto ban be lifted -as
the afternoon: a smoker will be held read. The regents acknowledged re-
in the banquet hall of the Union. lo- ceipt. of the resolution but asserted
ratio S. Earle, first State Highway that they had agreed to continue for
commissioner of Michigan, will pre- thepresent with rules now being en-
side. The address of the evening will Borced.
I£ delivered by President Clarence Business brought up at the meeting
ne dhveed y Pesidnt larnceconsisted of discussion of ways and
Cook Little. John S. Vo~rey, proes- jcmeans in which fraternities could get
sor of transpoadtjion. wr give the access to the books of the telephone
company in order to trace long dis-
G-. Lanphier, commanding ofhIcer at tance calls, and a discussion of eligi-
Selfridge field. will speak on "Avia- jbility of freshmen pledges. All ques-
tion and Airrorts." tions of eligibility are to be referred
d eill 5:n Will Spe o c to th ijudiciar committee of the
redlesdjay, Feb. 15, 9:30 o'clock council. Work of councils on other
in the morniog: G. C. Dillman, depl- campuses was also discussed.
it' commissioner chief engineer, of Concordia, a newly established local
the Michigan State Highway depart- fraternity, was admitted to the coun-
ment, will preside. C. E. Foster, o' cil after having petitioned for en-
the same body, will give a talk en- trance. With the admission of this
titled, "The Study of Concrete Pave- !fraternity the number of members in
ment s from Core Rec(ords." "SnowrI the council was brought to 55. The
Removal" will he the sulbJeOct of a |meeting yesterday' was well-attended,
-talk by V. ;. Burton. engineer of re-|owing to the recent ruling that two.
search and statistics, Michigani State ! succ'S sive alciences would result in
Hlighway department. V. J. EimQons ' the absent fraternity being fined. I
will speak on "Trends in Bituninous - -------
i'avement. Design." He is the directorT
of the Michigan State Highway lah-i ew alTSIssu d 4
oratory which is located in this town. For M en Interested
Moving pictures o bituminous con-I
crete pavenlent construction will he In Wpe ork
shown at this session.
Wednlesday, Feb. 15, 1:30 in 1111he----
a fterinoon: Th'1e, prcsiding officer will With more than 100 second semesterI
be Frank F. Rogers, S'tate highway 1 freshmen working on The Daily since
c1ommissioner of Michigan. C. A. 1\1o- i the opening tryouts last week, a call
lick, bridge engineer ,Phelps Vog ol. ias been issued for more who are in-
sang, forester, and S. J. Stewart, tierested in either the business or
maintaiinance sunervisor, all of tle editorial side of the paper to try out.
Michigan State highway department, There are opportunities for more,
will 'peak iresnect ively on "The UsI men in both departments, and due to
of Timber Ifoi' Secondary highway 1 the large number required to complete
Bridges," "The maintenance and De- the sophomore staff for next year, it
velopit of Roadsides," and "The is necessary tat a larger group be
eliopme t .f Rni siesiacciThe ~

t
1
a
r
r
J
1
c
t
1
i
7
7

Sate-Akt 6 Ne'wton11 111.7VmulCitizen For 1J 7
Earl Of Oxford Has Been In Failing Cabinet colleague, Newton D. Baketr,
health For Long mite; ew of Cleveland, as an anti-Smith "dry VANDENBERG GIVES TALK
Complications Set iI and progressive" possibility.
To Consider Walsh Resolution-~
SORRUW SHROUDS NATION Meanwhile the Senate began con- The citation of Fielding H. Yost, as
sideration of the Walsh resolution to the greatest and outstanding citizen
(By Associated Press) initiate an investigation of the fin- of Ann Arbor for the year of 1927,
ance of public utility power somip- marked the annual Lincoln Memorial
SUTTON, Courtenay, Eng., Feb). 1.anies which would take in their po-
-The Earl of Oxford and Asquith, litical activity, and the House pro- and Citation banquet of the local post
who, as Herbert 11. Asquith, prime ceeded in low gear on its biggest ap- of the American Legion. More than
minister, was one of the greatest fig- propriation bill, the $2,000,000,000 and 150 members of the legion and their
ures of the World war, was believed up postoflice and treasury supply guests attended the banquet, which
' measure. Neither issue came to a was held at the Masonic temple last
to be dying tonight. He had been head du-ring the day. The Montana
unconscious since early afternoon, senator held the floor in support of night.
and the latest bulletin issued by the his proposal for. several hours while The presentation of the citation
attending physicians, at, 8:45 p. m., the House heard a lot about prohibi- was made by Edward E. Spafford.
reported that he was slowly sinking. tion, immigration, tax reduction and national commander of the American
Oxford has been in ill-health for Coolidge econom'y as the Democrats Legion, and Coach Yost replied with
a long time, but pulmonary compli- see it. T'here was very little talk a short spech of acceptance.
cation developed and his condition about the supply bill itself, although The principal address of the even-
was immediately considered grave, the Democrats indicated - a fight ing was made by Arthur H. Vanden-
Early in the evening, Lady Oxford, against funds to permit the treasury berg, editor of the Grand Rapids IHer-
Princess Bibesco, his daughter, An- depairtment to advertise its govern- ald, who was introduced by Ruel I.
thony Asquith, and other members ment bond wares by radio. It might Blake, commander of the local post.
of the family were watching at the fill the air with Republican political Mr. Vandenberg Made his address an
bedside, but there was nothing in the speeches, they contended. enumeration of the reasons for which
aspect of this quiet village to indicate Madden Warns House he was thankful for being at the ban-
that the aged statesman was battling Maden, of Illinois, appropriations quet. Other addresses were made by
for life in the windowed room in the committee chairman-, warned the Willis M. Brewer, commander of the
red brick house, which borders a main House that it had extra budget pro- ,Department of Michigan; State Sena-
highway. posals aggregating $2,000,000 includ- tor Houghton, who represented Gov-
The whole British nation tonight ing flood control, navy increases and ernor Green; and Edward Staebler,
was watching with deep sympathy such matters, if they all went mayor of Ann Arbor. The invocation
the ebbing of the life of the man who through. There could be no tax re- was made by the Rev. Fr. David Cun-
held the helm of affairs at the open- duetion without extreme care, he ningham, and benediction was askedI
ing of the great war and who has said. That led Byrns, ranking Dem-o- by the Rev. Russell N. McMichael.
been part of the country's life for crat on the appropriations committee, A. D. and Rex Stanchfield livened up
the past half century. to challenge Republican claims of the program with a vaudeville spe-
Lord Oxford, or, as he was better economy.. The 1928 budget, he said, cialty in the form of piano interpreta-
known during must of his political would be $479,000,000 greater than tions and whistling novelties.
career, Herbert H. Asquith, retired the first Coolidge budget in 1924. -- -- - -- .
from politics on Oct. i 1916, whei he Garner, of Texas, Democratic lead- jT IE W ILL NOT
resigned from the leadership of his or. in a statement said there wasn't iRW
political party. His formerly robust going to be any such animal as tax B HERE TONIGHT
health soon began to feel the effects reduction.
of advancing age and he became an " Senate Democrats and Independent Owing to the serious illness of his
invalid, but was still fresh and vigor- Republicans would saddle the bill in ( mother, Albert C. Ritchie, governor of
ous in mind and keenly interested in March, when it ir to be let out o° Maryland, will not be able to appear
affairs, but was unable to move about connittee, with the tariff reduction here tomorrow night, it has been
owing to an infection of the leg. rider~ which he said the House would definitely announced by the Oratorical
approve by a. similar political lineup association, under whose auspices
PRESCOT T CLUB That would send it to President Govenor Ritchie was to have de-
.... s - - -.. - - - - r - Coolidge for a veto, was Garner's livered an address on the current

Wedemeyer, '28; Paul Ii. Wilcox, '28;
and Winton R. Wreggit, '29.
This number is 10 lower than the
number of students receiving all A
grades for the fall semester of 1926-
1927, 42 being awarded perfect grades
in Februar; 1927. The freshmen led
the list last year with 13 listed among
those with all 'A' grades. Next came
the seniors with 12 the sophomores
with 11, and the junniors with only
six.
The seniors led the list last se-
mester with 10 students achieving
perfect grades in all subjects. The
juniors ranked next with nine, the
sophomores next with seven, and the
freshmen last with six.
WARBECKEDISCUSSES~
CROCES PHILOSOPHY
-AuthorityOn Aesthetics Speaks O
Relationship Of Arts And 1
Everyday Life '
MAN IS POTENTIAL ARTIST
"Benedetto Croce has a versatility
equal to the greatest figures of the
' Renaissance," declared Dr. John M.
Warbecke in a university lecture yes-
terday evening in the Natural Science
auditoriutm.
Professor Warbecke, who spoke on
the subject of "Benedetto Croce, In-
terpreter of Art," emphasized the fact
that Art is closely related to every-
day life. According to the speaker,'
one of Croce's fundamental principles,
has been his insistence upon the inti-l
mate correlation of aesthetics and
materalistic life.
The typical man, Dr. Warbecke in-
sisted, believes that aesthetics has
something to do with Oscar Wilde at
a pink tea of a long-haired pianist
playing in a dimly lighted room. He1
added that Plato himself failed toi
realize the importance of the aesthetici
apprecati-on of true art.
In contrast to Plato, the speaker
pointed out that Keats had lacked an
undertanding of the importance of thei
imore material philosophy; but, al-j
though Keats had derided philosophy
and Plato aesthetics, both had used
he things they had falied to appre-
dlate in their works. "One's likings in1
the art-sshow one's fundamental char-~
acter," D~r. Warbecke declared. It
Returning to Croce's philosophy,
Professor Warbecke stated that Croce
had used the analytical method in his
treatment. "He has answered the an-1
cient question as to whether Art is
immitation by saying that it is intui-
tion," Dr. Warbecke said. "The argu-
nent that art is realism is false," he
continued. In support of this conten-
tion he used the illustration of im-'
mitating sounds on a piano. "There
is something lacking in this type of
playing," he said.
"We must distinguish action from
knowledge," Dr. Warbecke continued.
"Intuition has a relation to- know-
ledge, but intuition does not rise to
the distinctions of truth and falsity,"
he added.
Professor Warbecke concluded hi's
lecture by emphasizing the fact that
!it is impossible -to have an artistic
image in your consciousness and not
be able to express it. Thus, accord-
ing to the speaker Croce bridges the
gap between the -immortal artists such
as Dante and the average man in the
street. Both are potential artists,"
he said.

VARSIIY REIAINS IN FIRST
DIVISION BY VIRTUE
OF VICTORY
CHICAGO DEFENSE STRONG
HIatrigan Returns To Old-Time Form
When Inserted In Lineup
. In Second Half
(By Herbert Vedder)
Alternating between dull ragged
ness and occasional brilliance, Mich-
igan's Wolverines displayed enough
to win a close and rather humorous
game of basketball from the close-
guarding Maroons last night in Yost
Fieldl house, thereby reimaining in
the first division. By taking the
short end of the 26-23 score, Chica-
go lost its :opportunity of dislodging
the Wolverines from fifth place in
the standings.
No generalizations can well be ap-
plied to last night's squabble which
at times was exceedingly rough as
attested by the fact that Chicago and
Michigan each lost a man on fouls.
Scoring, such as there was, was rath-
er well divided, Rose leading the
Wolverines with seven points while
Farwell and Gist each snared as
many four Chicago.
Chicago Cuts Lead
After watching Michigan fritter
away a lead of 19-13 acquired be-
fore the second period was half gone
until the Maroons were within two
points of the Wolverines, the crowd
came .to life with cries for Capt.
Frank Harrigan who had been kept
on the bench after his showing
against Purdue. Coach Veenker ac-
ceded and Harrigan proceeded to put
up his most brilliant performance on
the local court this year, seeming to
recover much of his last year's skill
and 'floor work.
A moment later Gawne sank one
of two free throws but Kaplan broke
into the scoring column with a bas-
ket which put Chicago within a lone
point of the lead. Orwig returned to
the game in Gawne's place and made
a basket pronto, thanks to fine
breaking on his and Harrigan's Part.
Gist retaliated for Chicago making
the score 22-21, but the Wolverines
were driving now with Harrigan and
Orwig leadiing the way. Each made a
basket good, giving Michigan a five
point lead. Cooper, last Maroon sub-
stitute, reduced this by two and the
game ended shortly after.
Guards Are Strong
With McDonough and Hoerger do-
ing some fine guarding for the Ma-
roons, Bennie ' Oosterbaan's high
point aspirations were given a
decided setback, one basket each half
being the total of his scoring effec-
tiveness. Rose, who started in Harri-
gan's place, turned in a rather good
floor exhibition, being the Wolverines'
"Big Bertha" durin'g the first half
when he made all of his seven points.

MICHIGAN

(26).

B

t
t
i
t
,3
s
1

Oosterbaan, f........2
Orwig, f..............2
Chapman, c...........0
McCoy, g............2
Rose, g ...............2
Gawne, f ..............2
Harrigan, g (c).......1
11
CHICAGO (2 )
B

I

I

Painting Exhibition I

FT
0
0
0
0
3
1
0
4
FT
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
0

P'
0
0
1
1
4
1
0
7
P
4
1
0
0
0
9

TP
4
4
4
5
26
TP
'7
0
3
2
2
2
2

TO HOLD MEETING
The Prescott club, whose members
I are students in the School of hi ai'-
acy' wmill0hold its first meeting of the
seinester at 7:30 o'clock, tonight, in
room 165, Chemistry building. The
"speaker of the meeting will be Dr.
Robert J. Ruthe, chief of the Pharm-
aceutical division of the professional
service of E. R. Squibb and Sons com-
pany. Dr. Ruthe has announced his
subject s "Immunity-from the Lab-
oratory Standpoint." His talk will be
illustrated by four reels of motion
pictures. -
I L"I~u~l' fl'1 E'T1'

guess.
Will Give Plav At
Mummers' Meeting
As a feature of their one open meet-
ing of the year, Mummers dramatic
society will present "Evening Clothes"
at 4 o'clock tomorrow at Helen New-
berry residence. No admission will be;
charged for this play, but anyone in-
terested is invited to attend. After
the presentation of "Evening Clothes"1
tea will be served.

lecture
auditor
A tho
nounce
are neg
speaker
on the
that an
coming
'ay to
H-lossai
conclud
Series,
ious pl
the au
sociati

ilI C'JIA'7'L!C IXI'DTIJV

course toniorrow night in Hil !
oiso'g From Chicago Show I
ughl n osubstitute has been an-
""" s'st"ha oe~"- IsOn Displayr Here
A as yet, Oratorical officialsp
gotiating with several possible An exhibition of paintings selected 1
rs to replace Governor Ritchie from the fortieth annual showing ofI
program, and it is expected the art institute of Chicago is now on
announcement will be forth- display at Alumni Memorial hall. In-
. Arrangements are also under- eluded in the paintings are 46 pictures
obtain a substitute for Syud selected froum American painters in
n who was to have given the competition for prizes and awards in
ding number on the current the Chicago show. The exhibition at
but cue to a change of prer- the Alujnni headquarters, held under
-ns, will not appear here under the auspices of the Ann Arbor Art
spices of the Oratorical as- association, opened Sunday and will
on. continue through the month of Feb.
until March 4.
CANDIDATE, Among some of the American paint-
HIS E LECT'ION Iar exhibiting their works are Hayley
Lever with his "Mid-day in the Har-
ract the power of such Protest- bor," Ross Moffet with the prize win-
ganizations as the Anti-Saloon ning representation of a cod fisher-
"Such powerful organizations man, and Eric Hudson, with a marine,
he press that supports them Birown Sails." Moffet's painting was
oppose his administration," Mr. awarded the William M. R. French
r said. memorial gold metal at the Art In-
second point which is outstand- stitute in Chicago.
)out Smith is his wetness, in Marcena Barton is represented by
regard he differs from miost of "Sunday Morning," a painting of two
1n prominent in public life. He girls with long hair, which was award-
estly and squarely a wet, al- ed the Mr. and Mrs. Augustus S. Pea-
. in the opinion of Mr. Kimber body prize at the Chicago exhibition.
uld not be able as president to Leopold Seyffert has a colorful nude,

Farwell, f...........3
Zimnerman, f........
Gist, e.... ......3
McDonough, g........0
Hoerger, g...........1
Kaplan, I............1
Changnon, f .........1
Cooper, f............1

10

i

Person nel
zat ion."

of a ]M'antenance Organi-

PRO MINEN T INDIA N
WILL SPEAK HERE
Syud Houssain, who debated yes-!
terday with a member of the British
parliament, P. W. Wilson, o1l "Is
'Mother India' a True Picture?", will
address an Ann Arbor audience on,
Feb. 20, at 4:15 o'clock in Hill audi-
torium.I. Houssain is a national repre-
'sensative of India, an orator, a writ-
er, and an editor. He is a prominent

available to select irom this spring. AxKVIBr BE, LdE V m, a LA L .)IYl 1 1 1y Y
It is to be emphasized that exper- BUT FEARS RELIGION WILL PREV.
ience i-s not necessary, and that no
definite eliminations are made from E 'it's Note: The following is the second "It is a prime characteristic of Smith
the staff, anyone who is sufficiently of a s lic of interview with prominent facul that e does not straddle questions,''
iinterested to work being kept on the ineni es d n to give
s .ast rAeords and present possihi ities of the and adding that "He has fitted him-
staff. Appointments to staff posi- various men who wilt he candidates for the
tions as reporters are made at the presidential nomination in the two leading self for being a leader of the progres-
end of the freshman year, to junior chiefly for informational purposes, and do not sive and liberal men of the country's
positions as night editors at the end necessarilv indicate the personal preferences liberal wing."
of the sophomore year, and from of the men interviewed.) "He has made an admirable record
among the juniors are chosen the "I think the Roman Catholicism of in New York state," Mr. Kimber con-
Managing Editor and other senior of- Alfred Smith practically prevents the tinued, "and he has at the same time a
ficers for the following year. chance of his being nominated," Mr. sense of party loyalty and an exper-
The second tryouts meeting of a H. H. Kimber, instructor in history, ience and personality which are es-
weekly series will be held at 4:15 stated in regard to the candidacy of sential to effectual party leadership."

ENT

Free throws missed (Michigan)-
Orwig 1; Gawne 1; Harrigan 1; Rose
1. (Chicago)-Gist 3; Hoerger 1;
Zimmerman 1.
Officials-Young (Ill. Wesleyan)
Referee; Maloney (Notre Dame),
Umpire.
BASKETBALL RESULTS
Northwestern, 49; Iowa, 28.
Indiana, 43; Ohio State, 26.
Pennsylvania, 37; Columbia, 16.
LINDBERGH LANDS
AT HOME AIRPORT
(By Associated Press.)
ST. LOUIS, Feb. 13.-Flying through
fog and rain, Col. Charles A. Lind-
lgergh completed hi's 1,200-mile non-

s
t
.
G

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