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February 12, 1928 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-02-12

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SUNDAY, FEBRUARTY12 1928'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY,

PAGE THREE

40

I __ _ , _..... _._.. _ _ . _ _ !

SCHOOL MUSIC GROUP'
TO TRAIN IN SUMMER
UNDER JOSEPH MADDY
MEMBER OF SCHOOL OF MUSIC
TO ASSUME CHARGE OVER
SUMMER CAMP
PLAN TALENT DEVELOPING
Secondary Institutions From All Over'
Country Will Send Students To
Lake Interlochen
Practicing upon their music lessons
for violin, band instruments, saw~-
phones, and other mode of producing
orchestra music, in thebeautiful coun-
try around Lake Interlochen, more
than 400 high school students from
all over the Uhited States will at-
tend. the National high school or-
chestra camp, this next summer, ac-
cording to a recent announcement I
made by Joseph E. Maddy, member
of the faculty of the School of Mu-
sic. Maddy, who is nationally known
as a leader in the field of public
school music andm ethods, will be
in charge of the camp and will aid
in the direction of the orchestra
which will consist of the students
in attendance at the camp.
The purposes of this high school
camp are to provide an incentive to
all musically talented school pupils to
work for scholarship awards, to
reward outstanding students of music
by giving then' the advantages of a
camp and a scenic place to practice,
to give prospective teachers of musics
and musicians a, suitable start in
their life's work, and, mainly, to in-
terest many of the more talented stu-
dents in the profession of school mu-
sic.
The national high school orchestra
camp is an outgrowth of the national
high school orchestra whichhas been
organized by and which has played
before the Music Supervisors associa-
tion and before the National Educa-
tion association, respectively, in the
past two years. This organization
played so effectively that motions were
made concerning the encouragement
of music in the public Schools of
America, and also, added impetus to
a movement to secure more efficient-
ly-trained teachers for school chil-
dren taking music, courses. Obviously,
it was necessary to interest some of
the more promising high school grad-
uates in this field, and with this pur-
pose in mind, the National High
School Orchestra Camp association
was formed and incorporated in Mich-
igan,
Maddy Is President
The president nd musical director
is Mr. Maddy of the School of Music
and the secretary-treasurer is Willis
Pennington, an experienced camp-
owner and manager.
The site selected for this camp is
located at Lake Interlochen, about 12
miles from TraverseCity, Mich. Sev-
eral lakes which are safe for swim-
ming and boating are nearby, and im-
provements have been made so as to
satisfy the needs of those attending
the camp. Specially-built cottages are;
being erected to house the students,
faculty, and visitors.
Concerts To Be Given
Each Sunday during the term of
the camp, the 210-piece band will give
a concert in the afternoon and the
symphony orchestra of more than 280
pieces will give an evening concert.
These concerts will be given in an
amphitheater, Interlochen B owl,I
which is now in process of constru-
tion. It was designed by Prof. George
McConkey of the College of Architec-;
ture of the University. A stage, large
enough to seat the immense orchestra
and band, has been built. In front of
this will be a fountain colored by spe-
cal lights, and these will face the

main part which will seat more than
15,000 people. This amphitheater is
being built through the courtesy of
the National Association of Band In-
strument Manufacturers. The land on
which the camp and amphitheater
have been built was donated by Penn-'
ington.
The cottages are being built from
the $300 dollar scholarship funds'
provided by the camp members and
their benefactors, and many of the
improvements are being financed by
the camp officers, themselves.
The camp membership is open to
the students in good standing in four-
year or- three-year high schools
throughout the country. Candidates
must be recommended by high school
principal, the superintendent, and the
music supervisor. The names of all
candidates will be considered by the
committee in charge, who will first
RIBBONS AND
SUPPLIES
for all makes of
TYPEWRITERS
Rapim turnover, fresh stock insures
best quality at a moderate price.
0. D. MORRILL
17 Nickels Arcade. Phone 6615.
_RAAE
I SUNI)AY-MONDAY
JACK HOE

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. w a:r.r . s i.. w s r r .ro

select the best-quajified member for
a position from each state, and then
Classify the remainder as to instru-
ments and choose the best qualified
for the position in the band and or-
chestra. Those who can double in
both organizations will be preferred
in 1928, as the total is being limited
to 300 . The scholarships are to be
paid by the students themselves, their
schools, or by some club or other or-
ganization who can provide the money,
willingly.
The orchestra members will prac-
tice for two hours each day and the
band for one hour, under the guidance
of competent supervisors chosen by
the committee.
r.

'SADLER TO SPEAK 13 HIGH SCHOOLS r
AT CLUB MEETING1 ARE ACCREDITED
"The present and future o ! the Thirteen high schools in Michigan
American Merchant Marine," will be were placed upon the accredited list
the subject on which Prof. H. C. of the University at a recent meeting
Sadler will speak at the meeting of of the committee on Accredited
the Transportation club, Wednesday, i Schools. Their term of tenure will
February 15. last until June 30, 1929, when another
Professor Sadler, during the war, inspection will be made with the pur-
vwas a consulting engineer for the pose of re-accrediting.
Shipping Board. At present, he is the The new schools are Blanchard,
technical expert for a committee of i Brighton, Clayton, Coleman, Coral,
the Shinping Board considering the Hanover, Kingston, Osseo, Port Aus-
practicability of building a new type tin, Port Hope, St. Mary's high school
of liner which . will cross the ocean of Royal Oak, Vernon, and Whitte-
in four or five days. more.
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