100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 29, 1927 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-09-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

19~27.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY"

THEM HIA AL

EDL r[HCURSES IN SEIMETICS
Aniieent Art and 1angmiage of Egypt
lWill lie Suh)Jeet MIterial
For INeiv Courses
ENROLLMENT IS VERY LOW
Two new courses, one in Arts and
Archaeology of Egypt, and the other
in Ancient E-yptian hlanguage, are in-
cluded among those previously con-
ducted by the Semetics department.
Dr. Caroline Ransiom-Williams, lately-
returned froim Egypt, where she spent
a year as a miember of the scientific
staff of the Oriental Institute of the
University of Chicago, has been en-
gaged to instruct in the courses.
The first coiirse is "a survby of the
m~inior arts of E+urope." Thei survey
comm~ences before the third nmillenium
befo~re Christ, and concludes at a
period a few centuries after Christ.
The enrollment in this first course has
been most unsatisfactory, according to
Dr. Ransom-Williams.
The enrollment in the second course
offered has proved much more satis-
factory, 9 students having enrolled
this semester. Egyptian language has
not been taught to any-great -extent in,
America, although the center of the
language was. established at Chicago
more than 25 years ago. At the pres-
ent time it is being taught at Yale,1
tjhe University of Pennsylvania, the
University of California, anid in Drop-
sy college, a Hebrew institute in Phil-
adelphia.
Rr. Ransom-Williamis is well known
i~n the field of Egyptology. She began
studying the subject at the University
of Chicago under Professor Breasted,
head of the department. Following
ehat she studied at the University of
B~erlin for two years and during that
time also served as a voluntary miu-
seum assistant. After receiving a de-
gree from the Unive'sity of Chicago,
she taught as head of the pepartment
of Egyptology at -Bryn Mawr. Subse-
quently she wvent into the Metropolitan
Museum 'of Art for 6 years as one of
the curators of Egyptian art, and then
moved to Toledo, where she lives at
present'. Last year, as a member of
the scientific staff of the Oriental. in-
stitute of the University of Chicago,
Dr. Ransom-Will iams worked in Luxor,'
Egypt at the temple of Medinet Habu,
built about 1200 B.C., collecting texts
and inscriptions of the temple.
PURDUE-Complete audit of the
financial accounts of all campus "or-
ganizations show a gross income of
over $583,000. Only three failed com'-
pletely.

Dickinson Publishes
Economic Study For
Bureau Of Business
More than 300 American and Briit-
ish companies have systenis for en-
couraging suggestions from employes,
according to a study made by Prof.
Z. Clark Dickinson of the: economics
department of the Univrity .Profes-
sor Dicktinson's report is published by
the bureau of business research as
volume 3, Michigan Business Studies.
The report points ,out !the advan-
tages and disadvantages of various
systems for rewarding employes, who
make valuable suggestions, resulting
in improved methods' of production or
in greater safety to workers.
"Ordinarily 'the subject-nmatter of
suggestions is not limited," Profes-
sor Dickinson says. "Any proposal
which the emaploye thinks would lead
to improvement, whether by reducing
waste -of materials; devising a ;.new
piece of appar~atus, improving quality,
of production or' adding a new one,
reducing health and accident hazards,r
even by criticizing someone who is
derelicit in his duty are generally con-
sidered for prizes."
KANSAS-Oliver Dryer, noted ad-
vocate of world' peace, has been en-
gaged to speak rto the students by
the University Y. M. C. A.

CARLSON GOES TO
ROLLINSCOLLEGE
Glen E. -Carlson, former instructor
in sociology at the University of Mich-
igan while working'fqr a -doctor's de-
gree, accepted an offer of a position
as associate professor of sociology
and economics at Rollins college. Ac-
cording ,to Mr. Carlson, the college is
making an innovation in education-
the Two Hour Conference Workshop
Plan. 'It is a sort of cooperative plan
with small classes and more contacts
between professor and student," says
MVr. Carlson.
Mrs. Carlson, who took the Library
course in Ann Arbor last winter, is
assistant librarian in the Rollins col-
lege library.,

G~LEE CLUB TRYOUTS {
Tryouts forw the University of{
Michigan Glee club :wil be held
on Monday and Tuesday, Sept.
26, 27, from ;4 to 5 o'clock in
room 206 in the School of Music,
and from 7 to 8 o'clock in room
308, Michigan Union. All inter- {
ested men above top rink of {
freshman are urged to try out.{
All men, including fold members,
{must try out.
F' ranklyn D. Burger, Manaer.

Pro- i n ent Alumnus
Rec elves ColonelcyT
Dennis P. Quinlan, '92L, has just
received his ;promotion to a full col-
,0nelcyr with the position of chief co-
ordinator of the United States gov-
:.ernmient. In this office he works out
systems of economy for application
in government :business. He is also
president of the University of Michi-
gan club of Washington, D. C., and
president of the Second district of the
Alumni association.

FLOW £9
T hte D -t . , -Fv
lflFlw_

.{Y'S. . . . . . . . ..YfSY a fYR"Y" ..... . . .....saY} . ..

People's Sarnitary Market

i .) I'..MIRI JIVI'Y

I, I i )% i , !

plete line always in stock.. '~~ati 1 iciaduaprvrs o.

Typewriters
HA MILTIONS
State and William Streets

TheOh

C! 10l

QUALITY MEAT

I

wRo s e b u dugar-Cured
t: Smoked Hams, whiole
and half ..... ..... ...
.itFRT*. V~

Pot R(oast Beef....... .. 1e
Shoulder Veal Roast .. .. 23e
ALL MEATS AT CUT RATE

111

Ka pI-ON 7014
.. _ __ .. _ . . I _. . _

C ref. .111 lley

I

U-

IY~KIES

GCORNWELL GOAL - COKE

Subscribe For the

.-......f!"Y .........../"I

I

xv ..

-I

M

Scranton, Pocahiontas
Kentucky an~d West VigiiaC04Q
Solvay and Gas Coke

Long

Years

of

Tis b~usiness has been growing ever
since it was established. The secret-
"giving absolute satisfaction -to our
customers." We believe it pays to do
business in a' friendly way. If you
think so too, let's get together.

Talkn-

CORNW.ELL GOAL

- COKE

OFFICE, CORNWELL Bi OCK
Phones, Office : 4351-4553 Yard Office:; 5152

,

r

:,..

no

.
. , ,. t, v.

will not necessarily

convince you

lb

I

Starting Tod ay-

- .. ..

Yk

i

A -

f

Park Your Troubles in Our, Ticket

Chopper and

of the superiority of VARSITY
SE -VICE. So we exten~d an invi -
1atiou to you to. come and visit
our plangt and see for yourself
what modern equipment, pain-
takingmethod ., andskPd

T

lA

4

10workers can accomp'sh°

[i

t:;. . :

i

I

";
±
,{sI

to
A e 2
r ,"
k C
~ ; - .
t ' yr
-- ' '

. .-

+

aF-

Phone

4219

oftk4

nation!
Victur"
a

11

Who hasn't envied the traveling salesmnan? A sweetheart in .every.
town-more loving than a sailor lad-and not a chanceA of getting
anchored!

SMILING. JACK ftLFIALL
-and -
ADORABLE DOROTHY M~ACKAIL

J~yUNDI2y

In their most delectable version of love. via the Pullman route !
your only opportunity to discover the salesman secrets you've
waiting years to learn!0

It's
been

}

If

.[

01N THE STAG~E- I

i1.

6

111 O~(;JAR FRISCflF" Il

N

I

A

FA

1181

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan