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September 28, 1927 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-09-28

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28,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUETS WILL HAVE
CONTROL OF POLICIES,
ip ESII)ENt. ILiLlDIRECT ALL
44 Iotj'VIE ASSOIATON
ACTI'VIIES
SEVEN ON CONTROL BOARD
$ Rem.i ar 1Fneti'n s Of Organization
Are Coalwiaened; Groups Begin
I' To old meetings
1? Complete control of the policies of
' the Student Christian association is
4 now in the hands of the students, and
the direction of all activities center-
Ing in Lane hal are fomi now on to
bl e iunder the immedate direction 'of
1? William D). Brumbaugh, '2, president.
f According to a statement hie made yes-
terday "all matters of policy, having
Ii to do with the activities of the Student
It Christian association, are to be under
the actual control of .th student
I: members."
"Last ,June, George II. Likert, .'27,
V president of the association at that
V time,"~brought before the meting of
04 the student members the report of
, ; 'the constitution committee whose
chairman was Prof.1L. A. Hopkins,
or. the engineering mathematics de-
1s partment. The. eport was afopted
xa and registered wih the state depart-
meet. Thlis insuresautonomy in mat-
ters of policy 'and reduces the board
from 23 to seven, namely, Ira M.
Smith, registrar, chairman; Mrs. W.
J Bradshaw, Brumbaugh, Eugene S.
Clarkson, President Clarence Cook
Little, and Frank. E. Royce.
vWe shali~ ardly get any furthr
this year than to lay the foundations
oan which the work of the association
may be inelligently organized for the
next two or three years," Brumbaugh
continued. "The new constitution
contains the promises of 90 per cent
of everything th past student leader
have been trying to get, the promises,!
however, remain to be realized by
those who are now student, and who'
have the vision to carry on the new
work, perhaps in nw ways."
In addition tp 'gtting the new con-
stitution and mnanagement under
way, the new officers of the Student
Christian association have restarted
the regular activities of Lane hall. The
F Upper Room Bible class had its first
meeting last Saturday night, while
at the same time t~ Cosmopolitan
club 'held its frst social gathering of
the year. Most of the clubs compos-
ed of different groups of foreigners
have had meetings, and the various.
religios and discussion grous have
begun work. '
Brock And Schlee
w , Aids To Aviation' s
Cause, Says Evans
(By Associated Press)
DETROIT, Sept. 28.-While the
world heard with orror of the many
disasters in the Atlantic and Pa-
'" cific, met by trans-Atlantic pilots;
William S. Brok and Edward F.
Shlee were doing more to uphold the
public's confidec in avation than
any other aviators at that time, ac-
cording to Edward S. Evans, chairman. I
o f the' Detroit Board of Comerc
Aviation Committee and holder of the
round-the-world seed record in an
article in The :Detroiter. Brock and
Schlee, on their flight over the ocean,
after careful preparation, proved the
adage that a'god airplane can do
what it is built to do," Evans declared.
The reading of the record of Bock
aznd Schle is like reading the time-
table of a trans-continental express

train, according to Evans. "On August
28 they landed at Croydon, Eng., at
Munich Gernmany; on the 29tht; at.
13ehlgrade, Juogo-SIavia on the 30th, apd t
so on, clicking off the miles with 'a
remarkable precision which indlicated
careful preparations," Evans, said.
"The flight made by Linton Wells
a nd nityself in 1926 had been made de-
liberately with the attempt to create
interest, plus confidence, in conimer-
cial aviation, said Evans. "Six months
later in his flight over the North Pole,
Commiander. Richard E.' Byrd demon-
strated that no matter how rigorous
the, condlitions, aeroplanes would func-
tion satisfactorily w ifle Capt. George
Flubert Wilkinis in his "Stinsons was
confirming the record established by.
Commnandcer Byrd by taxing back and
forth across Alaska and out over the
Arctic wastes ais if it were an every-
clay job. Then, suddenly, in the early
summer of this year, Lindbergh'passed
across the ocean like a meteor, at last
airousing the world to a realization of
the wonderful plossibilities in the air-
plane.

NEW YORK- TO-SPOKANE FL YER STOPS FOR GASOLINE

_ :....5

Professor Of Poitical Science Retuir #s
After Serving Wilth Juri st's ComiIssion

t;

After spending several inoulhs in C ourt at th1we1i lgue, was tpresideur t
South Africa as one of two lllgt~ he co01mmis.sion
from the United States appointe1d by 'The 0session was the first of its kintd
President Co'olidge to the Ite(rnal ion ev-er 1.)b he l, Professor Revosex-
al Comlmission of Jurists for the is-ir- ])ltiflwd iliii interv iew, the com>mis i
pose, of codification of int ernvi al o
law of the Americas, Prof. Jee MA.
Reeves, hlead of the politicall scien 'e_
department, is again back atMii
gan this semester. Professor ieeves
returned to Ann Arbor early h Jub1
The commission to which PT'ro f(. sor yr p,
Reeves was appointed in 192:;, n.it atdth
Rio de Janeiro in April, and agrl-ec,
upon 12 convbtntions or trea ties oif'
jpnbl1'c and a complete code of pr ivatm,
international law. Out of 21 republ) 1ics
In the western hemisphere, t17 were
represented. The results were tni t mmtedtth vaougermns

pion ])gill- c- iatied by the'
Anwericau Congre c;which
-4,1ntl~ tago inl123.Tlh(. agu . 'f
u 1s has1,4been stud~yin: thet codif
t . of internlatioa-d law for st
ime, ~ ~ ~ int i.astaduttheir gr,
11s one10 (On1"se0' findividuals,
ficiall r. sentave<<s of gwv

(

This. photograph; shows the pl]an e of Thoinas 1R Colby, then leading t he New Y ork -to-Spokane air racers,
as it stopped to r'efuel at Cleveland, 0 hio. Colby was later forced out of t he derby which was won by C. W.
lolmiaw rr.he.Jnsert shows Pilot Col by partaking .of a welcome sandwich.

represented, to be referred finally for
consideration and possible adoption at
the sixth pan-American Congress to be,
held at HavaB p. in January, 19281
The other representativ e from th.
United States was br. James Brow n
Scott, formerly solicitor of the State
Dbpartiment, a delegate to the TTYaguec
Peace conference of 1906, and technmi-
cal advisor on international law to i ho
Paris Peace conference in 1919. Epi-
tacio. Pessoa, formerly president of
Brazil and now a judge of the World
t GLEit CLUB TRYqITS
I Tryouts for the University of1
Michigan Glee club will be held
on Monday and Tuesday, Sept.
126, 27, from .4 to 5 o'clock in1
Iroom 206 in the School of Music,
and from 7 to 8 o'clock in room
'308, Michigan Union. All inter- I.
eated men above the rank of
freshman a're urged to try out.
All men, including old members,
1 must try out.I
Franklyn D. Burger, Manager.
1,f
general. charge of experimentation
The u'pkeep of fences, fire protectlin.
the clearing out of underbrush, ark'
the disposal of cut wood will be in-
ehudd.d in Prof. Mat'hew's duties.

...~x~

-4i"

A

,4

I

PRO"F. SPEYER GIVES HEARTENING
OUTLOOK UPON BELGIAN AFFAIR S
Prof. Herbert Speyer of the Uui-
versity of Brussels, who is lectuimiug W n ega r i'
toa nparliaiiientarismin the -____________
Natural Science aduitorium, gave an =
opt imistic view of Belgium's struggle r t
towardls pr'osper'ity ini an initerview
yester(day. According to Dr. Speyer,
Lleilyenisaamii miniscounty, the currency is stabilized, and
the after-effects of the W orld W ar are ri la y ben ov c m .'
Wkhen speaing of American-B~elgian
rehatilons. Profess;or Speyer expressed r. "--"' :"::. .
in the warmest ferms Belgium's ap- * ,,. . . ...
preciation of Anmerican aid rendered I-~.
after the war. He was especially en-
thusiastic about the Belgian Relief
Commnission, headed by IHerbert
4 Hoover, speaking of Mr. Hoover's
ability in time-highest terms. "America :?'
saved us .from famine," he said.
H-owever, accordling; to hDr. Speyer,
(not only Belgium, but the Belgian Coo-
nies are now on the high road to pros-
perity, and~ Belgiumi's only fear i1e~rtHoe
another war. Speaking further on for- IreltHor
eign relations, Professor Speyer stated American university, Professor Speyer
that the hope of his country wais the many would keep her word.
Lea,,gue of Nations and th at thme big said he was pleased with collegiate1
question in Belgium wa s whether OCr- life and the be utiful facilities which
When askzed whait h-e thoughit of an are afforded by the University.t

Mathews To Diect
University' Forests
Prof. Donald M. Mathews of the
School of Foresty and Conservation
has been appointed general manager}
of all the University's experimnental
forests. These include S'tirch-field
jWoods, Saginaw l orest, White's
Woods, and a small nusryre
ard street. These forests have never
been 'centralized but have existed as
separate stations.
Professor ;Mathews will cdrreje -
the activities of the school andslave
ISmebody Is Ake,

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-"DISCOVER;,Y NIGHT" w-- 4 Big

Ac--s

v'ayg Taking the Joy Out of Life ByI3RIGGSj

THC PRT~-rrl TGIRL YOU VI3R
SAW ARR\Vff At A VACATION
RfsobRT A'ND 'loU 'MAEUp
CUr2 M lN _ 'OU rMUSTJ( 1N OW
HERf.

AFr~iZ Y0V AR~E ,iw-rQnurso ,
you FIND ouT HER AuNr SoPH-IE
IS AL.WA-VIS AROUNC)AN[) .i V.R
Lc-r5 -rme (aikL ov-r CF HCR sI .'

/WT=-rA WHOtL E ~EK 'U
FlNJD THL OPRORrVNrrT .'
PERSVADE -THE -SW~ETYOUNG-,
CFRE' TYRE TO SIT OUT )N T5-lE
SIMER sous:E (ORPEGOA) 4AND
WATCH T4 4 0MCN R iS C

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AN , V 5HtC 3SWOOPS -THROUGHW-TH
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fuRrHING- -' r:, -"kVi; f

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A~ND Auii+T .53OPPIMI5ItNG-"
HER C H R G G4OCS 3c6UTIN
ALL o\JEf THEPREMiSIkS FVR HER
.ate'

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HER U LST CC 1 /E Q poaN'T
5MaK QL. ~QG
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is no shoe like The

Florsheim :Shoe and no better
timne to find it out than now.
FOIL THiE MAN WHO CARES

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J'd11oilStyles $10

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CAMPII
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The m~oker~rn BeterCgAe/t
..ntcogi ti

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\- ALL

JS BOOTERY

youth State Street

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@ 1927,'V. Lorillard Co., 11st. 1760

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SEIORS'

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orlralt is N W.v

REFRESHED FROM VACATION AND AT YO UR BEST

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