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January 08, 1928 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-01-08

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~'ACF~ TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

sxNDAY, JANUARY 8, 192s

A

TEt#S REVISED FARM
BILL WILBE PASSED
Congressan~ ii kiugei Oldiiil Over
Prespects For Agricultural
Relief Mea sure
SA iFARMERS NEED AID
Amecrican farmers wouldl be getting
neardy a billion and a half dollars
more annually if thcy were marketing
their1 products umder the provisions of
the ,4igNary-IHaugen agricultural re-
lief ~meiasure which was vetoed by
President Coolidge at the last ses-
sion~ ~Congress, according to Gil-
bert H1augen, Congressman from
Iowa and co-author of the bill.
Haugen is confident that the re-
vised"Thll which has been brought be-
fore the house wviii again he passed
and thinks it stands a good chance of
being approved by the President. The
new bill still holds the equalization
fee 9.1ause to which President Cool-
idlge s6 strongly objected, but most of
the other objectionable features have
been eliminated.
In the estimation of Congressman
Haugen, the bill will enable the farm-
ers to share part of the $7,000,000,000
adde'd-to the country's revenue by en-
forcement of tariff, transp~ortation,
and immigration laws. If the bill is
passed it will afford $1,442,000,000 to
the farmers, a -sum that will pay off
the farm debt within i11 years. AtI
pre'sent there is an average shortage
of $1,175, allowing six per cent for in-.
vestment.
Last year, ending June 30, 7,777 of
a total of 47,000 bankruptcies were
farmers, according to 1-augen. He
also shows the difference in the stand-
ard of farmers and other workers.
The average farmer has an annual in-
come of $730 per year, $630 of it be-
ing expended for fuel, while the en-
come of those engaged in manufactur-
ing is $1,572, of minister, $1,298, and
of teachers $1,650.
AWARD PRIZE TO FORMER
[flICHI6ANFACULTY MAN

lProinenII't SOciOlogist Says IIeredlity
AJnd Enviroinment Trogelther
Afiect Individual
6IVES STATISTICAL DATA
Advocating additional research into
social cases of the professional crim-
inal as "worth all the time and money
that we can spend on it," Prof.
Arthur Evans Woods, in a recent pub-
lished paper on the subject urges fur-
ther facilitie's for this work through-
out the country. "With the accumu-
lation of definite sociological material
in this field we should have in time
abundant data on the genesis of the
criminal mind," the report slates. "It
is a process, which I fear, will suffer
but little check from the improve-
ments in the criminal law to which
the leaders of the bar are assiduously
giving their attention."
After a. rather complete elucidation
of the factors which make the pro-
cess of criminal research highly val-
uable to the study of crimiq~ology and
the solution of the crime situation,
Professor Wood states that this brings
us, finally, to consider the sociological
approach which leads (lirectly to the
heart of problems in criminal re-
search. To sub-stantiate this state-
ment let us state briefly some of the

underlying concepts of modern sociol-
ogy. First of all, it studlies man as a1
secius. that is, as a member of aI
group. It makes sharp divi'sion be-
t ween heredity and environment, con-.
ceiving them b)oth as joined inex-
tricably in a mutually dependent and
interacting relationship. The term ex-
])ressing this synthesis is "develop-
ment," which implies both the biolog-
ically given and Ihe conditioning en-
vi ronment, the latter involving ma-
terial culture but also the ideals, cus-
toms, habits, and mores of the group.
For the undlerstanding of the indi-
vidual therefore, the central clue is
his social heritage, which becomes, as
it were, focused in his mind and per-
s onal ity.
"Thie individual and social mind are
thus parts of an organic whole which
are viewed in isolation only at the
cost of rendering them both meatilng-
lcsi. In the developing conscious-
ness of the individual awareness of
self is contemporary with an aware-
ness of the group, and personal
development, or the 'dialectic of per -
sonal growth,' as it has been called, in-
volves throughout experience a give
and take between these two poles of
the life process. Hence it is that in-
dividual standards and values are
likely -to be those of the group,
though room is left for pirogress

through individual variation and but these are conditioned by and find
selection. The individual envisages their fulifiliment through social en-
himself as he is reflected in the mind vironment."
of others, though through the creative Continuing more completely'a dis-
imagination ideal censors and pat- cussion of these 'sociological factors,
torn's may be set up, depending on his Professor Wood concluded this por-
temperament and education. The or- lion of the paper with the statement
ganic uses of the individual includle, that "The disruption of neighborhood
to use the analysis made familiar by and ftnnily life, crime andl delinquency
Thomas, the desires for security, new are, then, to lbe view ed as major
experience, recognition, and response. symr'ptoms of this disorganization.

AIRPLANES DROP DPLTS ERAliIAAP8fllfh l8
- O... .. F PROFESSIONAL CRIMNAL AS IMPORTANTFACTOR IN OLUTION OF CRIME PROBLEM

Naticual Guard airplanes have been called into service in the New York
health departmuent's fight to prevent a diptheria epidemic. Above, Health
Commissioner Matthias J. Nicoil is shown with Dr. Clinton P. McCord and
D~r. James WV. Wiltse giving pamphlets at Albany to two aviators who scat-
tered them over the state.

SPE ECH FA CUL TY POST AL 0F1'ICIA LS
HAS CONVENTiON PLAN AIR ROUTES
Eight members of the University de- (13 Aso iatel P I ess)
lpartment of speech attended the an- WASHINGTON, Jan. 7.--Post office
nualconenton f th Naionl Aso-officials promised a call tor bids with-
cialcnetion of heo Speecha which in two months on air mail routes con-
ciaionof eacersof peeh wichnecting all of the large industrial
was held in Cincinnati during the cities of Michigan and two Indiana
Christmas holiday period, cities with the trans-continental and
Prof. James M. O'Neill and Prof. New York-Chicago overnight airmail
- , . .scrvice following a conference held
Louis M. Eic h of the University de- here today.
partment are members of the exe- Two routes would be established,
cutive committee of the association. one to extend from Bay City" to Kala-
Professor Eich was also secretary of mazoo by way of Saginaw, Flint, Pon-
the association during the past year. tiac, Detroit, Ypsilanti, Ann Arbor,
Proesor 'Nillan Prf.RobrtJackson and Battle Creek with a
Proessr ONeil ad Pof.Robrtround trip daily beginning at Kala-
Hannah were also among those who- mazoo at 9:35 o'clock, with arrival at
participated in the programs of the Bay City at 1 o'clock, departure at
sessions. Professor O'Neill read a 3:30 o'clock and arrival at lKalamazoo

At the Christmas meeting of the
American Historical Association in
Washjngton it was announced that the
Herbert Baxter Adams prize for the
most meritorious investigation, in the
field of European history by a young
scholar had been awarded to W. Free-
man Galpin for his work on "The
Grain of England During the Napol-
eonic Period." This prize is open to
competition every two years. Dr. Gal-
pin was; formerly an instructor in. the
I-istorypepartment of the University
of Meh-igan. H~e is now teaching in
Syraegse University.
Dal pin's book wvas published in
19252Y er the direction of the Exe-
cutive .Board of the Graduate School
of thietUniversity. It is the sixth
volume in the series in History and
Political Science.

paper discussing the founding of the
association, which took place in 1914.
Professor Hannah read a paper on
"Interpretation of Lyric Poetry."
"The Relation of Speech to Phil-
ology and Linguistics" was the topic
of a second paper read by Profess or
O'Neill while in Cincinnati. This
paper was read before the American
Philogical Association which wa i
meeting in the city at the same time
as the speech association convention.
The other Michigan men who were
present were: Prof. Gail E. Dens-
more, Lionel G. Crocker, Earl E.
Fleischman, Ralph J. Harlan, and
Orville C. Miller. Professor Deusmore
was chairman of the resolution's com-
mittee.
More than 250 teachers of speech
representing schools, colleges and
universities all over the country were
present at the Cincinnati convention.

at 6:40 o'clock at night.
The other route would extend from
Muskegon to Chicago by way of
Grand Rapids, Kalamazoo (where
connections with the planes of the
eastern Michigan services~ would be),
South Bend, Ind., and Laporte, Ind.

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