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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 16, 1927 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-12-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PACE EIGHT

kTHE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, DE'CE.\IPI,''TZ 1 G, 1 _'7

.. vsmm.w.w w 1

DAILY OFF ICIAL BULLETIN
Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members ot
the University. Copy received by the Assistant to the President until
3:30 p. m. (11:30 a.in. Saturday.)

GIGANTIC STATUE!MM[ rFCUT OOLIDGE GIVES FLYER TROPHY
Ut TO ATTEND '0MEETI S x z

I

Volume 8.

FrHii)AY,lDE('EMIER 10'.

Nu1Ac~ 5.

Automobile Permits:
All students who wish to re-apply for Automobile permits should call at
the Office of the Dean of Students on or before December 16, 1927 to obtain
application blanks. These blanks should be filled out, and handed in or
mailed to Room 2, University Hall before December 27, 1927.
Permits and plates will be ready for distribution on December 30 and 31,
1927, and on January 2, 1928.
J. A. Bursley, Dean.
Dean's Avisory Connuittee, College of Literature, Science and the Arts:
A meeting of the Dean's Advisory Committee is called for Friday, De-
cember 16 at 4:10 p.m., in Room 1210 Angell Hall.
John R. Efinger.
University Lecture:
Dr. Raymond Lslie Buell, Research Director of the Foreign Policy As-
sociation will lecture on "African an International Problem" at 4:15 p.m., Fri-
day, January 6, 1928, in thli Natural Science Auditorium. The public is
cordially invited.
F. E. Robbins.
Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors o le College of Literature, Science, and
the Arts :
Beginning Wednesday, January 4, the Upperelass Advisory Committee wil
consult with those who desire help in making their elections for the Second
Semester. The Committee will meet in the Recorder's Office, Room 4, Uni-
versity Hall, mornings, and in Room 25 Angell Hall, afternoons, until further
notice. THE ELECTIONS OF ALL SOPHOMORE STUDENTS EXCEPT
THOSE WHO CONTINUE IN ALL SUBJECTS MUST BE APPROVED BY THE
UPPERCLASS ADVISORY COMMITTEE. Please report to the Committee
according to directions which will appear in this Bulletin beginning Tuesday,
January 3.
C. C. Meloche, Chairman.
University Women in Residence During Vacation:t
Closing hours must be arranged with the house head for the period ofr
December 17 to January 1. Grace Richards.
Chinese Stdents Club:f
All members are cordially invited to the Social meeting to be held inv
Wesley Hall at 7:30 p.m., tonight.
Tan . Tsang, President.
All Campus Organizations:
Contracts for organization space in the 1928 Michiganensian have been
mailed to officers of all fraternities, sororities, clubs, and miscellaneous or-
ganizations. appearing in the Michiganensian last year. There will be space
available for a few additional pages after the usual number is taken care of.
All contracts must be signed and presented at the Michiganensian businessI
office on or before Friday, December 16.
Organizations Department.
Staff-Michigan Daily:
Regular staff meeting has been postponed from Monday, January 2, 1928,
to Tuesday, January 3, 1928. All members of the staff must be present at
4:30 o'clock. First issue of The Daily will be published Wednesday, January 4,
1928.
William C. Pusch, Business Manager.
Ann Arbor Art Association:
The American Federation of Arts Water Color Exhibition in the Westt
Gallery, Alumni Memorial Hall, closes Friday afternoon, December 16.f
Bruce X. Donaldson, President,
Mortarboard:d
Mortarboard gloves have arrived. Will all girls who ordered them pleaset
call for them today between 10 and 11 o'clock at the desks in University hall.
Josephine Norton. c
News From Other Colleges
HISTORICAL BODY CONI)EMNS the year to the most valuable memberss
MAYOR'S ANTI - BRITISH STAND of the Frivol staff, humor magazine.I
Awards will be made for the best qual-
NEW YORK.-The American His- ity of work submitted by any staffa
torical Association, meeting at Cohim- member.I
bia University recently, condemnedc
the stand of Mayor Thompson of Chi- ]WILITARY SCHOOL BANS HAZING
cago as unjust. The meeting passed FOLLOWING FREShMAN INJURIES
resolutions to the effect that history-
written from an unbiased standpoint Virginia Military Academy, Lexing-
was better in the end than that writ- ton--azing may be all right in its
ten to further undeserved hero wor- place, but it can go too far, is the
ship. The members stated that they opinion of the authorities at the acad-C
were not guilty of British leanings, emy, and as a result of their reason-s
but that they merely wrote so that the ing, there will be no more hazing atI
truth, hitherto buried in American V.M.A.
propaganda, could be known. The trouble started when a fresh-f
man was taken to the hospital after
WILL AWARD KEYS TO MEMiERS hazing escapades. Now all of the 700
OF HUMOR MAGAZINE AT IOWA who went on a strike have had all
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.--Honorary special privileges revoked until Dec.
keys will be awarded at the end of 22. And there will be no more hazing.
Somewhere To Go
during the

Christmas Vacation
HARRIS HALL

A heroic bronze statute of George
Washington now tops the dome of
the courthouse at Washington, Pa.,
named for the first president. It
was designed by Leon Hermant, of
Chicago, weighs three tons and 14
feet tall. Above, the statute before it
was raised to its lofty pedestal.
ATTEND CONVENTIONS
ilemubers Of Business Administration
Faculty To Join Meetings Of
NationaI Associations
WILL 0 OTOWASHINGTON
Five members of the faculty of the
School of Business Administration
will go to Washington, D.C., spon after
Christmas, for meetings of several na-
tional associations connected with the
field of business administration.
Prof. Clare E. Griffin, acting-dean
of the School of Business Administra-
tion, who is the present chairman of
the marketing section of the Ameri-
can Economics association, will aid in
the discussions of that body. Prof.
Ernest M. Fisher will take part in the
discussions of Land Economic associa-
tion. Prof'. Earl S. Wolaver will meet
with the teachers of Business Law.
Prof. Carl M. Schmalz will lead discus-
sions in the problems of bureaus of
Business research.
Prof. Olin W. Blackette will deliver
a paper on "The Place of Statistics in
Business Training" before the Ameri-
can Statistical society.
ISSUE INVITATION
TO ATTEND DANCE
The St. Louis Illini will give a
Christmas Holiday dance for Big Ten
students and alumni in and near St.
Louis on Tuesday evening, December
27 at the Town Club. Music will be
furnished by the Varsity Club Orches-

gy 74 4 Da Ltogy
POLITIC(A L 'l NCE, FE&O~;OMluS,
HlIST1ORY A N!) ('19~1)(11Y
PROFESSORS TO LEATE
TO HOLD JOINT SESSION
lfi'eal M)scussio)' To Be Condneted
By Reeves; Aiton AndId oak WI
Pr. snt Paier
Many faculty members from the
political science, history, economic,
and sociology departments will attend
the meetings o various associations to
be held in Washington, D.C. De-
.ember 28-30. The American Political
Scince, American Historical, Ameri-
cah iconomic, and American Sociol-
ogical Associations will all hold meet-
ings there.
From the political science depart-
ment, Prof. Joseph I. Ilayden, Prof.
Jesse S. Reeves, Prof. Thomas 1H.
Reed, Dr. Paul M. Cuncannon, Prof.
Robert T. Crane, Prof. Everett S.
Brown, and Howard B. Calderwood
will all attend the 23rd annual meet-
ing of the American Political Science
association.
Will Hold Discussion.
Professor Reeves will conduct a
round table discussion on, "The Work
of the State Department and the
Foreign Service." Professor Reed is
chairman o' the Committee on
Policy, which will discuss the future
policy of the associations. Professor
Hayden is Secretary-treasurer of the
association and Miss Laverne Burch-
field, secretary of the political science
department, will have charge of the
registration bureau.
Six members of the history depart-
ment will be in Washington to at-
tend the 42nd annual meeting of the
American Historical Association. Pro.
Arthur LL. Cross, Prof. Preston W.
Slosson, Prof. Ulrich B. Phillips, Prof.
Arthur S. Aiten, Prof. Arthur E. Boak,
and Esson M. Gale.
Professor Boak will give a paper
on "Byzantine Imperialism in Egypt,"
and Professor Aiton will give a paper
entitled, "The Asiento Treaty as Re-
flected in the Papers of Lord Shel-
bourne."
Will Hold Joint S*ession
The Historical association will hold
a joint session with the Political
science association on Wednesday eve-
ning, December 28. At this time the
association will make its annual
awards. Henry Osborn Taylor, Presi-
dent of the Historical Association,
will give the principal address on "The
Laymen's View a ;Hi sor.,"while
William Bennett Aunro, president of
the Political Science Association, will
speak on "Physics and Politics: An
Old Analogy Revised."
The Historical Association will hold
a number of group sessions during the
three-day meeting, with the principal
motive as the study of research. Pro-
fessor Cross is a member of the Exe-
cutive Board while Prof. Claude H.
Van Tyne, who will be unable to at-
tend the meeting, is a member of the
Educational Board.
tra.
Tickets in advance will be $2 per
couple. Reservations may be mailed
to John Rabenau, 1500 Central Na-
tional Bank Building."

of cutover lands were turned over to
the state conservation department
this week by Auditor-General 0. 1.
Fuller and will be added to rAliez
acreage held by the conservation comn-
mission to bedused either as i'
hunting grounds or as game eugs
The amount of land returned to the
state for nonpayment of taxes is in-
creasing constantly, but most of i is
coming back in sections where recrea-
Lion is the only industry of the com-
munity, according to records, most of
:,it is more valuable in the states lhand-
than on the tax rolls under present
conditions.
The acreage just turned back includ-
ed sections in 15 counties distributed
-ge.eover the state. As fast as the land is
Senting time Herbert Schiff Memorial deeded to the conservation department
d States navy aviator, at the White it is placed in charge of the land
ily to the naval aviator attaining te division. The game refuge division
.ua.nand the reforestration-divisionmgo

President Coolidge is shown pre
trophy to Lieut. Arthur Gavin, Unite
House. The trophy is awarded annua
greatest number of hours in the air wi

POET DEPLORES LACK OF INTEREST
IN COLLECTION OF ALUMNI BOOKS
In respone to the Union's request somewhere, and I think I've indicated
that authors among Michigan alumni it; the apparent lack of interest at
I furnish certain of their writings for IAnn Arbor in at least literary growths
C a collection of books to be main- which have their roots in the campus."
tained in the Union library, Leonard
Cline, whose books "Poems" was re-
(lquested by the Union, has replied de-
ploring in particular the lack of in- .
terest that has allowed Michigan
authors to go unsung in their own
country.
"The development of a collection of
books by Michigan men would mean
more to students in the rhetoric de-
j partmnents, if I know anything of W e W isl
undergraduate psychology, than fiveS
more classes," he declares in replying I
to the Union committee's letter.*
As an alternate, he suggests that the
the University deny itself another
building like the new library if neces-
some fund $50 or $100 a year for the
purchase of books by its alumni. "And
if I know anything of the psychology
of writers, such a program would do
more to endear their alma mater to
them than anything I can think of
right now in the category of the
feasible," he said.
Turning for a disparing comment of
that first book of poems, Cline men-
tions a number of other books much
better, he thinks, from the reviewst e h e 1.a lra dg
they have rcCeivedl at least, and com-I
ments that so far as he knows "they
were not reviewed in The Michigan I Across from
Alumnus nor were they mentioned in
The: Daily," thought they are on sale
in Ann Arbor book stores.
Tracing back for a moment to the
"old days at Joe Parker's and the
Orient," and the commenting on the
football team, Cline regrettfully de-
;dares. "There's something wrong

over the land and select the acre
which is desired for its purposes.
Some of the land is in large blocks of
40 or 80-acre tracts. Much of it has
d been stripped of all mnerchantablo
t timber and aside from game cover
will be of little value for some years
to come.

'GIVEN CUTOVER LANDSu
Conservation Department Deeded Over
180,000 Acres For Public Use
As Hunting Grounds
USELESS ACRES INCREASE
LANSING.-More than 180,000 acres

AI

1

You the

Yuletide
neable

FT'S
Store'~
Law Building

AGift of BeautyC
for Long Service

_GRANGER'S
Last Dance Before Vacation
TONIGHT
9 to I
$1.00 per couple
For those who are staying in town or who are not leaving
until later, we are having another dance tonight. Lots of
pep and fun is promised for every one who attends.
After vacation-Dancing every Wednesday,
Friday, and Saturday
Granger' s Academy

(Cor. State and Huron)
Sunday, Dec. 18-6:15 P. M. Supper and
Carols.
Tuesday, Dec. 20-7:00 P. M. Bridge Party
Wednesday, Dec. 21-4:00 P. M. Tea.
Christmas Day-6:00 P.M. Christmas Party
(Phone 8613 if you intend to come)

Superbly designed; fin-
ished in your choice of most attractive colors, the
Royal Portable Typewriter is a Christmas re-
membrance with universal appeal - everybody
wants one, anybody can use one. It is a writing
machine that will render invaluable service to
every member of the family, at home, in school, in
the office or when traveling. Built by veteran
craftsmen, notable for ease of operation, the Royal
Portable is priced at $60.00 complete with hand-
some carrying case-many prefer gradual payments.

I"
AN EXCELLENT
CHRISTMAS GIFT LIMITED EDITION
THIS YEAR'S
MICHIGAN CALENDAR,
BEAUTIFUL AND ARTISTIC
75c
_ DON'T FAIL TO TAKE ONE HOME WITH YOU

.!

I~~M 2002Awm~qm WIIdU\1i r

I

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