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December 13, 1927 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-12-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

No"SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAII-Y

TUESDAY. DECEMBER 13. 1127

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5 1

A

WIN

OVER

M.

S.

C. AUGURS

WELL FOR

VARSITY FIVE

4

BRILLIANT DEFENSIVE
WORK~ IS FEATURE Of'
197T28 CAGE DEBUT!

BRILLIANT DEFENSE-. 30,...-...
COACH MATHE'S WOLVERINES
CARRY ON WITHOUT
OOSTERBAAN
NEW PLAYERS SHOW WELL
Last Night's Scrimmage Devoted To
Removing Of Rough Spots
From Offensive
"Oosterbaanless," but nevertheless
highly effective for an opening con-
test, Coach Edwin J. Mather's 1927
Wolverine cagemen displayed the es-
sential potentialities of being another
great basketball team in running
rough-shod over State in their first
encol'iter, namely a good defense, re-
liable veteran material, and promising
new candidates. However, several ap-
parent rough spots appeared in the
play of the Michigan team which must
be ironed out.
The sources of greatest strength
shown by Coach Mather's charges in
the traditional State tilt lay in the
close guarding of the entire Wolver-
ine team which limited the Spartan
sharpshooters to an exceptionally
small number of field goals for an
opening encounter, and in the promis-
ing performances turned in by several
,of the newcomers.
Raber, Kantz Show Wel.*-
The work of Raber and Kaft the
two new men who started at the for-
ward berths was especially graifying.
Raber proved beyond a possible' doubt
that he possesses all of the attributes'
of a great forward, his shootig was
accurate to an unusual degree, he
covered his man well on defense, and
his floor work was about all that
could be desired.
Kanitz, likewise stamped himself a
capable floor man, using his speed to
an advantage in advancing the ball
into an enemy territory and passing
well under the basket. Basamo also I
gave several pretty exhibitions of
passing during the brief interval he
was in the game.
Capt. Frank Harrigan treated the
spectators to some real teamwork,
carrying the ball through the entire
State defense time after time by his
deceptive dribble; only to "feed" it
to some teammate who was nearer to
the basket, instead of taking the shot
himself.
Besides scoring a total of 3 points
largely through his ability to -cage the1
ball from near the center of the floor,
the veteran McCoy also played a
strong defensive game, although ac-
casional lapses in alertness allowed
State to score on several occasions.
Nevertheless McCoy displayed a no-
ticeable lack of the teamwork, that
featured the play of Harrig4n, fre-
~quently attempting long shots 'instead
of passing to one of his mates who
was in a position to make a close
shot.
Shooting Of Sharp Variety.
The accuracy of Raber, McCoy, and
Harrigan, on the few occasions when
he elected to attempt a shot instead
of passing to a teammate, offset the
combined efforts of the entire Michi-
gan State team. The Wolverines out-
scored their opponents two to one
from the floor by garnering a'total of
18 field goals. The winners also
proved themselves capable of :scoring
frequently from the foul line by count-
ing in seven of their 11 attempted free
throws during the contest.
Last night's drill consisted largely
in ironihng out the faults that rappear-
ed during the State contest in prepar-
ation for the second test of Vhe sea-
son with Pittsburgh, Thursday night.
Coach Mather is faced with the prob-
lem of determing a new starting line-
up for the encounter.

R
f
t
IZ

ALL-AMERICAN SURVEY
REVEALS OOSTERBAAN IN MEMORIAM
AS UNANIMOUS CHOICE
Carl E. Ohlmacher, '25, appointed
Three Michigan players have been sports editor of The Daily in his
mentioned for all-American honors senior year but unable to accept the
this year by various sport writers position because of illness, tied
who have undertaken to select these Sunday in Ann Arbor. The body will
ibe taken to Detroit for services and
mythical teams. Oosterbaan, Baer,
and Gilbert, are the trio of Wolver- interment.
ines so honored.
Bennie Oosterbaan has been named
on virtually every all-American team
chosen. Several authorities have pick- ' L ' N T S
ed Gilbert -and Baer for their first,
team, while a majority of the remain-j
der have placed them on the second GATHER IN NEYI YORK
or third elevens.
Following are the Michigan players Ban Jobnson, Deposed Head of Junior
named for all-American honors by the Circuit, Is Absent For First
sport critics: T i ei.In History

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,1

Grantland Rice-Oosterbaan; Baer
selected for the squad,
United Press-Oosterbaan; ;Baer on
second team; Gilbert on third team.
New York Sun-Oosterbaan.
Davis J. Walsh-Oosterbaan; Baer
on second team.
William Roper-Oosterbaan; Baer
on second team.
Harry Costello - Oosterbaan and
Gi ; Baer on third team.
J'ohn Kieran (New York Times) --
Oosterbaan and Baer.
Central Press Asociation-Ooster-,
baan; Baer and Gilbert on second
team.
Lou Little (Georgetown coach) -
Oosterbaan.
Billy Evans-Oosterbaan; Baer on
second team; Gilbert on third team.
Quin Ryan - Oosterbaan and Baer.
Hearst Syndicate - Oosterbaan;
Baer on second team.
Warner-Rockne-Jones-Oosterbaan.
Wa'lter 'Eckersall - Oosterbaan:
Baer on second team; Gilbei on
third teami.
ALUMNI WILL FETE
VARSITY TANKMEN
Entertainment by alumni in sever-
al cities will be a feature of the
Michigan swimming team's eastern
trip during the Christmas holidays.
Michigan alumni clubs in Erie and
Philadelphia have planned banquets
for the visiting Wolverine swimmers.
The New York alumni' are also de-
sirous of entertaining the Michigan
aquatic team.
The itinerary of the team includes
T'oledo, Erie, New York, Philadelphia,
and Washington. Swimming meets
with representative teams will be
held in all these cities.
Last year the team did not invade
the East, but they made a very cred-
itable showing on a trip through OhioI
and Indiana.
Participating in four meets, the1
(Continued on Page Seven)

'THREE ARENEW PILOTS
(By Associated Press)
NEW YORK, Dec. 12.-Baseball
magnates and managers gathered here
today for the annual conventions of
the major leagues, which will con-
sume a bigtportion of the week.
Today's task for the steering com-
mittees of the National and American
League was to decide on matters to be
reported upon at the joint meeting
,of the leagues Thursday.
Tomorrow the National League will
hold its annual session, and on Wed-
nesday the American League will have
its annual meting.
Many new faces are visible with the
managers. Roger Peckinpaugh, the
new pilot of the Cleveland Indians;
Jack Slattery, manager of the Braves,
and Burt Shotton, at the helm ofathe
Phillies, mingle with the select for the
first time.
While Bill McKechnie, of the Pi-
rates, comes here in the role of man-
ager of the Cardinals, the conclaves
are not new to him.
TILDEN HUNTER QUIT
(By Associated Press)
BULLETIN.
BOSTON, Dec. 12.-Neither William
TV. Tilden, ranking American player
nor Francis Hunter, partner with
whom he won the 1927 .national
doubles titles, will be available to
America for the 1928 challenge round
in Daris Culp play in the American
zoue
Tilden told the Associated Press to.
night that he planned to sail for
France about the first of May and'
would not return to this country untilc
the middle of August.
DES MOINES-An income of $25.-
000 for life was bequeathed to Grace
Stevenson, student at Iowa universi-
ty, by Marion E. Griffin, Spenserl
banker and philanthropist.

UrLttNLL urntPnI__
Northwestern Surprises by Smothering
Highly Touted "Little Giants"
From Wabash
ILLINOIS EKES OUT WIN
By Herbert E. Vedder.
Minnesota pried the lid off the
1927-28 boiling pot called officially
the "basketball season," but she did
it in a little different way than did
the other Conference schools who
were playing curtain raisers Satur-
day night. Cornell college of Iowa,
hiding under that lid, proved to be
one of those pack-in the box Santa
Claus delivered too soon and jumped
up to slap the Gophers 25-21.
The "Thundering Herd," just re-
moved from a great season on the
gridiron, apparently has not yet be-
come accustomedl to the rather ab-
breviatel clothing worn by basketball
players.
Three others in the Big Ten did
not fare any too well, however, Chi-
cago receiving a real scare when Mon-
mouth of the IllinoisConference forced
the Maroons into an overtime period
before Nels Norgren's boys from the
Midway managed to finish on top, 33-
29. From all indications, the over-'
time was Chicago's best period.
Ohio won out from Ohio Wesleyan.
by a mere six point margin, in a free
scoring affair which ended in a 42-36
count.
By gaining an 18-6 victory over Coe
college's Mohawk's, Wisconsin gained
the honor of taking the most ridicu-
lous game of the evening. It would
seem that the Badgers and Buckeyes
might learn a bit from each other as
each has what the other lacks. Ohio
could stand a bit of Mr. Meanwell's
apparently marvelous defense while
the Badgers would profit from a little
basket shooting lesson from the
Buckeyes. With these minor improve-
ments made, both should have great
teams.
Illinois almost kept its athletic
(Continued on Page Seven.)
MURCHISON HOLDS OWN

PECKINPAUGH IS CHOSEN [ """" N flhI] CONSTRUCTI*IN OF NEW BET THET [1 [flE
TO MANAGE CLEVELAND ONE L0AUA LT IIIflN S I-M BUILDING ADVANCES BETA THETA P! GOUS
INDIAN BASEBALL TEAM pnurrnruir nnritrn& DESPITE BAD WEATHER TAlnATIPO riiin

Although the work on the new In- UI UINA I i I LU
tramural sports building is considera- _
bly behind schedule at the present Shama Alolha 1u Will Plav For Title

i

blyif11i1 bein sheulTaTt[1rl X'lily x
time due to the unfavorable weather In Fraternity Water Polo
conditions of the past week and a Tournament
delay in the arrival of part of the
structural steel, the construction is SWIM FINALS THURSDAY
progressing as well as can be ex-
pected. The weather, according to Winning the semi-finals in the inter-
the building superintendent, is thes.
factor that has proved most trouble- fraternty swimming meet from Sigma
some. : Chi, Beta Theta Pi won the right to
Rvery possible effort is being made enter the finals on Thursday for the
by the construction crew to take full interfraternity championship. The
advantage of the present favorable ic'ore of yesterday's meet was 30-17.
warm spell, the men working as late Sigma Alpha Mu by virtue of a win
as 10 and 11 o'clock at night in pour- over Phi Chi 5-2 in the interfraternity
ing the concrete that is not yet w ater polo contest will be one of the
nn teams to play in the finals on Thurs-

I

Roger Peckinbaugh
Who once formed with "Bucky"
Harris one of the best keystone com-
binations in baseball, is now a rival
of his erstwhile manager, having
signed a contract as manager of the
Cleveland Indians.
These two, who as teammates back
in 1924 stopped the onrush of the
New York Yankees who were headed
for their fourth straight pennant, will
again in 1928 attempt to stop this new
and perhaps greater Yankee team,
this time as rival managers.
Peckinpaugh was named most valu-
able player to his team in 1925.
FORMER MAT ACE
REJOINSHOOSIERS
(Special to The Daily)
BLOOMINGTON, Dec. 13-Five let-
termen are available for this sea-
son's Indiana university wrestling
team. Thb Hoosiers finished fourth
in the Big Ten last year and have
good prospects for another success-

place.
The greater portion of this work at'
the present time is confined to the
second floor of the middle section of
the btilding.
All of the structural steel that can
be erected at the present stage in the
building operations is in place. In
addition, the roof has been laid over
the greater portion of the building.
The westl end of the structure is now
completely covered, leaving only the
eastern portion of the covering to
be put in place.
The brick and stone work is pro-
gressing rapidly in spite of the wea-
ther handicaps. At the west extremi-
ty of the new building the brick work
has reach a height of 50 feet, while
the walls are betwen 14 and 16 feet
in height around the remaining por-
tion.

(lay.
.In the quarter-finals, Phi Kappa
Psi won the swimming match over
Kappa Nu 34-17, defeating the same
team in water polo 3-0. A special
quarter-final swimming match will be
held at the Union pool this afternoon
when the Theta Cli natators take on
Delta Tau Delta, for the right to com-
pete in the semi-finals which will be
held on Wednesday.
Theta Chi xwiiibattle Phi Kappa
Psi in water polo on Wednesday for
the right to compete with Sigma
Alpha Mu in the final match for the
interfraternity water polo title.
Lillian Ward of Texas has signed a
contract to make a "solo" flight from
Paterson, New Jersey, to Lyons,
France, uniting the two largest silk
centers of the world.

4

i,

I

ful campaign.
Captain Swain, of Lizton, former (By Associated Press)
Big Ten champ, is back in scnool BULLErIN.
following a short time of teaching in . ECATUR, Dee. 12.Loen murh-
the klaomaschols.Sw!son, slirliit ,lasit of two olydt-plc
the Oklahoma schools. Swain was one games, who has been near deatr in a
of the best grapplers ever turned out Decatur hospital since Wednesday,
at Indiana. His return to school has suffering from cerebro-spinal menin-
sent the wrestling stock soaring. gitis, was "holding his own, with slight
The other four lettermen out for imprOvement," the bulletin of his con-
the team are : Walter Eakins, Rush- dition said.
ville; William Schoolfield, Greenfield; Another 48 hours, the doctors be-
K. Props, Marion; and Stanley Stohr, lieve, should tell ,hiether Murich-
Terre Haute. !son will recover.

UNI~

-- - -- - - - - -- -

See
Our
Win-
dmows
For
Gift
Selec-
tion

See
Our
dows
For
Xmas
Dis-
plays

Cbvietmae
Gift Suggestions

GIFTS FOR A MAN
FROM A MAN'S STORE

4
A''

C

NECKWEAR-
A new tie is always acceptable. New
selections of Italian Silk Crochets and
repp-silks. Striped patterns and plain
colors.

We might tell

you a

number of things

richness

of Ann

Arbor Dairy Pas-
teurized Milk, but
about the purity and
to be thoroughly

convinced

of its

goodness, you Tust
use it!
ANN ARROWR

1 3;!
"'y.lq
,v
:a
A. YI
C'
t :d
-rr
"J

For Your Xmas Gifts
SEE THE NEW, COMPLETE LINE OF
MEN'S WEAR
Scarfs -. Neckwear - Hats-
Sport Coats - Shoes - Linen
Handkerchiefs - Silk Dressing
Robes.

GLOVES-

WOOL HOSE-
Plain and fancy patterns in the various
weights. Two numbers of Argyle pat-
tern are featured.

SHIRTS-
Tan, green, blue and white basket
weaves and the new striped oxfords
are the most popular' colored shirts this
season.

Mr , «
fj
,i;
, ;
r
%
V

NECKWEAR
PAJAMAS
SLICKERS
WINDBREAKERS
MUFFLERS
3 GOLF CLOTHES
JEWELRY
HOSIERY
GARTERS
BELTS AND BUCKL
SMOKING
JACKETS
HANDKERCHIEFS
GLOVES

SHIRTS
DRESS VESTS
CRAVATS
SUSPENDERS
SWEATERS
BATHROBES
DRESSING GOWNS

A large assortment
goat skins-lined
which to choose.

of pig, deer and
or unlined from

wQ
# 1 -

4

KUPPENHEIMER

Ilp I

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