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December 09, 1927 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-12-09

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ESTABLISHED
1890

g

Lw a

4a1

4 MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESSI

. .. . ........ . . ..........

TIiN PAGES

VOL. XXXVIII, No. 69.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, DhCEMBER 9, 1927

P I ROIETIANTE1ITEETS H 'EA TM LS

SONG BY LCL ROBINSON LEADS
nirrEXCLUSION FIGHT
wILL FEATURE SIXTHI
WWJ MICHIGAN NIGHT '

PROMINENTMA N T EESTYS O Wv , Nb ETAMLSS
BY HOOVER MEN N
IN LUMBER INDUSTRYi MINNESOTA ARGUMENT
TO MEET HERE TODAY ;. OVER LEGAL QUESTION

SENATE BATTLES
OVER VARE ENTRY

i

CROSS, STURGIS, AND

O'NEILLj

WILL SPEAK AS PART OF f
RADIO PROGRAM
WILL PHOTOGRAPH GROUP
Special Numbers Will Be Arrang'-
nuents Of Popular Michigan Songs
Of Past And Present
A repertoire of 19 songs by thej
University Glee club under the di-
rection of Theodore Harrison, of the
University School of Music, will be the
feature of tonight's Michigan Night I
radio broadcast over station WWJ,
according to the complete program an-
nouncement made yesterday by Wal-
do M. Abbot, of the rhetoric depart-
nent, program manager and announc-
er. The program will go on the air
promptly at 7 o'clock, eastern time,<
for the regular period of one hour andi
is the sixth of the 1927-28 series,
As a special feature tonight, at the
conclusion of the broadcasting, Mr.
Abbot announced that a flashlight
photograph. of the studio room, locat-
ed in University hall, will be taken.
The picture will be made so as to#
show the Gle club as well as one of
the speakers before the micropiioxe,

LITTLE REQUESTS FORESTERS TO
INSPECT AND ADVISE
NEW SCHOOL
WILL HEARFACULTY MEN,
Timber and land owners and lumber ?
manufacturers are in Ann Arbor today
to attend a meeting called by Presi-
dent Clarence Cook Little to advisef
and inspect the new School o Forestry
and Conservation. Two committees
representing the upper and the lower
peninsulas of the state are in attend-
ance.
From the upper peninsula comes E.
A. Hamar, John M. Bush, President
Hotchkiss of the School of Mines at.
Houghton and Otto C. Davidson of
Iron Mountain. The lower peninsula
is represented by Harry Fletcher, Al-F
pena; Herman Lundin, Gaylord, form-
er head of the state conservation com-4
mission; and W. L. Sanders of Cad-f

:,,:.; ;.
r: s
:
c
,; $

* E4'S OPENIN)G CONTEST HELD
IN HILL AUDITORIUM
LAST NIGhTr
WISCONSIN MAN IS JUDGE
I Taking a negative stand on the
proposition "Resolved that the prin-
ciples of the Baumes Law of New
1. ..n1-ih .

Senator J. T. Robinson
Democrat, Arkansas, who led the
fight in the Senate yesterday to ex-
clude William S. Vare. Senator Rob-
inson is minority leader.
NEED OF BIBLE STUDY
Noted Bilical Scholar Stresses Three
Reasons For iiten Sie Read ng
Of Biblical Sources

i
f
r

just as they would appear during the
regular broadcasting period. IS ABERDEEN PROFESSOR f
Glee Club Sings First I
The first number on tonight's pro- Declaring that "no one can be con-{
gram will be a group of five songs by sidered an authority on English litera-
the Glee club, which is composed of ture who does not possess a knowl-
52 male voices. Included in this group edge of the English bible," Dr. Alex-t
are: "Laudes Atque Carminia," by A. ander Souter, noted biblical scholar,I
A. Stanley; "The Victors" by Elbe!; opened his lecture on "The Latin
"Varsity" by Moore, with words by Bible," yesterday afternoon in Natural
Fred Lawton; "College Days," by Science auditoroium.
Earl Moore, from the opera, "Koali- According to Dr. Souter there are
zaland," and "Men of the Maize and I three reasons for the study of the old
Blue," by Gornetzky, from the Michi- manuscripts which make up what is}
gan opera, "Tres Rouge." knov~n as the Latin bible. In the firstt
The second.item:wil}.be a short talk place, "It provides us with many
by Prof. Arthur Lyons Cross, of the words and phrases of the colloquialc
history department, on the subject, language, which are invaluable to the}
"Truthful History." Dr. Cross, who is student of Latin vocabulary and;
the first of the three speakers on the idiom." Another fact which makes
tonight's program, is the author of the study of the Latin bible important1
a "Short History of England," and is "because the original Greek and}
several other history books. He will Hebrew manuscripts from which the1
speak concerning the teaching and Latin translations were made haveJ
particularly the writing of history. perished." The third use, stated Dr.}
The third number on the program Souter, to which the Latin bible can1
will be another group of songs by the be put "is that of study for the sake
Glee club, including "Now Let Every of the subject matter." "Every fresht
Tongue," by Johann Sebastian Bach; language in which the bible is read<
"Where'er You Walk," by George reveals to us new riches and newi
Frederick Handel; "Old Gray Robe," beauty in it" asserted the sepaker.
(Negro spiritual) by Huntley; an: Then Dr. Souter proceeded to out-
"Wake Miss Lindy," by Warner. line the history of the translation of1
An address by Dr. Cyrus C. Sturgis, the bible from the Greek and the
director of the Thomas Henry Simp- original Hebrew into Latin. This was
son Memorial Institute for medical made necessary because the lowerj
research, will follow this song group. classes of people in the Roman em-I
Dr. Sturgis will confine his talk to pire were not able to understand
the symptoms and cure of pernicious Greek. Vast numbers of the Romans
anaemia, a disease which is said to could read and write Greek fluently,
have afflicted more persons in Mich- at least anyone who professed to be
igan than in any other one state in cultured. In fact, according to Dr.
the country. Dr. Sturgis will also Souter, in the early years of the Ro-
touch upon the work that is being man empire, Greek was almost neces-
done by the institute. sary to communicate with the bulk of
doneby te intitue. ithe Roman citizens.
Last Group By Club -
Another group of songs by the Glee SQUAD
club will follow this address. Includ-F
ed among these will be: "Where No TO AT TEND 'BUST'
One Asks the Who or Why," " 'Tis j
of Michigan We Sing," arranged by I Attending the matinee performance
Earl Moore; "I Want to Go Back to of the musical comedy, "The White
Michigan," arranged by Earl Moore; I Eagle," the members of the 1927 foot-
"Friars Song," by Diekama from the ball squad, the coaching staff, and
Michigan opera, "Contrary Mary," and the varsity band will be the guests
with the solo part to be sung by tomorrow of the University of Mich-
Philip Culkin, '28; "Goddess of te igan Club of Detroit, as a feature of
Inland Seas," by Peters, with words the the annual alumni "Bust." As5
by Gayley; and "The Bum Army," guests at the banquet but not at the
by Earl V. Moore, with words by Fred1 afternoon performance, will be in-
Lawton. cluded the varsity cross country team,I
Prof. James M. O'Neill, head of the coaches, and trainers, members of thr.
speech department, will then deliver Detroit all-city high school team, and
the concluding address on tonight's the official scholastic all-state team.
broadcast, taking as his subject "The The banquet will take place at 7
Function of Speech Education." Pro- o'clock in the Statler hotel.
fessor O'Neill joined the Michigan
faculty this year, coming from the
University of Wisconsin to assume
the duties of head of the speech de-[
partment.I
The Glee club will bring the pro- EGARDING
gram t6> a close with a final group of
four selections, closing with "The
Yellow and the Blue," by Balfe, words Student Councilor Of S. C. A. Negates
by Gayley. The other three conclud- Present Attitude Concerning
ing numbers will be, "TIk Musical Supposed Disbellefs
Trust," by Hadley; "The Cossack," Siil 1
by MacDowell, from the opera, "Mo- DISCUSSES NEW CHAPEL
rinzki"; and "Bow Leg. Boy," DISCU S WA
Bergen with words by Eugene Field.
The entire program will, as usu as. "I am not one who claims that be-
be in charge of Abbot, who an- cause students are relatively indiffer-
nounces that it wil be the last Mich- ent to many current expressions of re-

iliac.
vation
vited ti
An
forest
meetin
AnnAr
ation
Both
school
and ac
will ou
way an
forestr
the I:
commi
The af
dated
means
land o
will be
The
in tw
penins
held in
upper
Chicag
cluded
beside
spring
meetim
Presid
bers o
lumbe
lower
held i
passed
dorsin
tablish
also p
ment
would
Com
trict
Arbor
Little'
school
been r
CIT
Step
S'teere
an air
at an
tors o
which
nanci
Two
it was
is 2,9(
Estim
made
as ext
will b
which

Representatives of the conser-I
commission have also been in-
o attend.
Additional Group Comes.
additional group representing
interests have been called in
.g by George P. McCallum of
rbor to discuss questions of tax-
on cut-over lands.
i groups will inspect the forestry,
this morning as to personnel
tivities.Members of the faculty
itline the present projects under
nd will attempt to show how the
ry school can be of assistance tot
amber owners. At noon both(
ttees will lunch at the Union.t
ternoon will be spent in consoli-l
meeting in which ways and
of cooperation between timber-
wners and the forestry school
e mapped out.
Two Groups Conte.
committee men were appointed I
o groups, one for each of theI
ulas of Michigan, at meetingsl
n the spring oQ last year. The
peninsula meeting was called in,
;o by President Little and in-
members of mining interests'
s the lumber men. Later in the
the lower peninsula group
g was called in Chicago by
ent Little and included mem-,
of mining interests besides theI
r men. Later in the spring the t
peninsula group meeting was,
n Ann Arbor. Resolutions were,
1 by this latter convention in-
g the University's plans of es-
ling a new forestry school. They
assed a resolution to the govern-
urging appropriation which
make the school lossible.
mittee men chosen at these dis-
meetings, assembled in Ann
this morning at President
s behest tO inspect the forestry
and to see what progress has
made since its inaugural.
Y CONSIDERS
AIR PORT PLANS
s toward the developing of the
farm south of Ann Arbor into
r port were discussed recently
meeting of the- Board of Direc-
of the Chamber of Commerce
was called to consider the ii-
al direction of the work. I
300 feet runways are possible,
reported, as the available fieldf
00 feet wide and. 3,000 feet long,
ates as to the cost are being
at present and it is considered
tremely probable that an airport
e established at the Steere farm
is three miles outside of the

Yorx stiouiad be enact ea into taw in the 1
other states," the Michigan men's de-
:bating team lost its opening debate of
the year last night in lill auditorium.
In commenting upon his decision
Herbert Hoover the judge, Prof. A. T 'Weaver, of the
Whose supporters showed partic- department (J speech of the lniver-
ular interest in his candidacy for sit y of Wisconsin, pointed out that the
President in 1928 at the meeting of the two teams were very closely matched
Republican National committee held in all phases of the argument and that
yesterday. as is so often the case in close debates
he was forced to render his decision
on the errors of the contesting teams.
In this respect it was his belief that
the Minnesota team had litle advan-
Cage in being the least offender. Botht
teams were guilty of slight errors par-
I ticularly in delivery and each con-
___ !tributed some peculiar examples of
Republican Natioiial ('cmtiiltee Feels logic to the argument.
Hughes Has Joined Coolidge IIb Miller i Lresides.
Reuiouueing &aldidsy the oratorical association introduced
the chairman, Prd. E., D. Dickinson
HOOVER MEN AFTER HELP of the law school. Harold Golden-
--- ~~berg openedl the dlebate forMinst
(fy Associated Press) and the affirmative.a is contribution
WASHINGTON, Dec. 8-As leaders to the discussion was an account of
of the Republican party moved today the cost and extent of crime in the,
toward laying the groundwork for its United States and the expression of
convention in Kansas City next Jun2, the atfirmative belief that the habitual
there was talk that Charles Evans criminal will be found at the core of
Hughes might be chosen as temptr- this situation.J
ary chairman of the meeting. He was followed in the introduction
Those members of the Republican of the affirmative case by his col-
national committee who are charged league, Joseph Vesley who established.
with making arrangements for the the affirmative belief that a man who
convention were called into confer-- has been convicted of felonies has.
ence by Chairman Butler to map out proved himself a danger to society.
the general program, other commit- Cedric Jamieson speaking last Llor
teemen began to start for their hoin- the affirmative brought in the third
es convinced that the party must look affirmative issue which was the tak-
elsewhere than to President Coo!- ing of the power of discretion from
idge for its candidate. They felt al1 the hands of th u ders.
that Mr. Hughes had eliminated himt-ClsOcu.
It was in his speech that the first
self from the field, real clash of the evening appeared.
With both Mr. Coolidge and the for~ IThe question of Judicial decision being
mer secretary of state generally con- upheld by the negative. The other
sidered out of the running, the com- decisive clash was over the question
mittee members let their speculation '[as to whether severity of the punish-
turn freely toward Secretary Hoover, ment a deterent to criminals. In
Vice-president Dawes, and Frank 0. 1Ithis case, the negative d'fered its evi-
Lowden, with some discussions here dence to prove severity a deterent and
and there about Senators Curtis, of the affirmative accepted the opposite
Kansas, and Willis, of Ohio, the only views.
avowed candidates for the nomina- Further than the two issues on
tion. which they decisively clashed with the
Hoover' supporters appeared espe- affirmative, the negative endeavored
cially interested in whether the ad- to take the position that the proposed
ministration would take any stand on section of the Baumes law was wrong
candidates and pressed each other for in principle and would not work out
confirmation of reports that Postmas- - in practice. In an effort to support
ter General New, Secretary Davis of this belief they cited the instances of
the war department, and Secretary juries often freeing men rather than
Work were favorable to the candidacy ! sending them to jail for severe sen-
of their colleague, the commerce sec- tences.

William S. Vare.
Alleged Senator-elect from Pen-
nsylvania, whose right to take the
oath of office the Senate discussed
throughout yesterday's session.
EXPECT LARGE CRO'ND
AT SOPHOMORE PROM~
Christnias Decorations Will Lend I
Holiday Atmosphere At Aninal
Affair Tonight
TICKETS STILL ON SALE,
Tonight, trimmed with more than
50 Christmas trees, redl and green
wreaths, and mistletoe, the ballroom
of the Union will furnish the setting
for the annual Soph Preni. Some 25
couples, dancing to Jack McGay's 10-
piece Country Club orchestra, of De-
troit, will add to the creation or n
holiday atmosphere.
Leading the grand march, which
will form promptly at 11 o'clock, will
be George Holbrook, '30E, of Ann Ar-
bor, and his guest, Dorothy Hoy W;-
liams, '29, also of Ann Arbor. The
Reograms company, of Lansing, will
film the march and later portions of
the dance. Still pictures of the affatr
will be taken and sold later in the
evening._
Favors for the event will be dis-
tributed throughout this afternoon
and tickets will be on sale this after-
noon and evening in the lobby of the
Union. Miniature red clocks, appro-'

TEN PAGES
OUESTION or'SEATING
VARE STILL UNDECIDED
BY SENATE DISCUSSION
SENATOR ROBINSON LEADS FIGHT
AGAINST SEATING OF
PENNSYLVANIAN
CONGRESS DOES LITTLE
Defic iecy Appropriation Bill, Flood
Control, Oil Scandal, Foreign
Policy Face Congress
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, Dec. 8.-Considera-
tion of the case of Senator-elect Wil-
liam S. Vare, Republican of Pennsyl-
vania, brought forth so much oratory
today in the Senate that a vote on the
proposal to deny him the oath of of-
fice, pending a further hearing was
deferred until tomorrow.
Senators who favor administering
the oath and deciding later whether
Vare is to finally be excluded opened
five hours of discussion and their ob-
servations stirred up the opponents
of that proposition with Senator Rob-
inson, the ,Democratic leader, contrib-
uting the principal, address against
giving the oath.
At intervals during the debate, the
original Norris resolution to exclude
Vare without ceremony was modified
to accord him the same treatment
meted out yesterday to Frank L.
Smith of Illinois--a hearing before the
special campaign funds committee
and the privilege of the floor to speak
on his own behalf before the exclusion
vote is recorded.
Move Otherwise Amended
The resolution was also amended
in other particulars, one change being
a direction to the committee to report
on the case within 60 days if prac-
ticable. This was proposed by Sen-
ator Robinson at the suggestion of
Senator Reed, Republican, Peunsyi-
vania, who is leading the fight for
Vare. Senator Reed said that he had
been advised by thetchairman of the
privileges and elections committee
that only 60 days would be required
for it to count the Pennsylvania bal-
lots in its consideration of the contest
brought against Vare by his Demo-
cratic opponent at the polls, William
B. Wilson, secretary of labor in the
Woodrow Wilson cabinet.
At the request of Senator Reed and
after a recess of 45 minutes, the sen-
ators also changed the Norris resolu-
tion to eliminate a statement about

retary.
As the members packed their grips j
for the trip back home, they made no
secret that they were gratified that
they could return with a definite an-
swer to the question of President Cool-
idge's part in the campaign. There {
were still a few who insisted that the
President was still open to the draft
in the event of a convention deadlock,
but by far the greater share believed
he had definitely closed the door to
further occupancy of the White House.I
DANCES IN UNION,
NO T TO BE HELD '
There will be no membership danc-
es at the Union this week end it was
announced yesterday by Union offic-
ials, since the regular Union orches-
tra is playing in the Union opera
which will play both tonight and to-'
morrow night.
The Soph Prom, however, will te
held in the ballroom of the Union
tonight in place of the regular parry.

DIFFER ON LEAGUE RULES
(By Associated Press)
GENEVA, Dec. 8.-Differences be-
tween Poland and Lithuania have pro-
duced some friction between members
of the League of Nations council as
to methods of procedure.
LAWYERS TO GIVE DANCE
More than 100 couples will dance to
the strains of music played by Frank
Jones' orchestra, one of Jean Gold-
kette's groups, tonight, at the formal
dance at the Lawyer's club sponsored
by those in residence there.
DETROIT HIGH SCHODs
IHERE WITHGRAD UATE~
Large Groups Of Faculty Mlen D~iscuss'

priately engraved with gold block M's, fraud and corruption which Senator
constitute the gifts for this year's Reed insisted prejudiced the case for
formal. Following the custom of past the committee
years, it is urgently requested by the The new 70th Congress showed in-
committee in charge that no corsages I cipient but unmistakable signs of de-
be worni.veloping those attributes which would
All preparations for the party h :e mnark it as the full fledged, lineal de-
been completed, with the exception scendant of the Congresses that have
of the procuring of the crystal batl !gone immediately before it.
that was to be used in conjunction The Sente grew increasingly talka-
with the subdued lighting effect thalt tive. The House sawed wood. The
will be employed during the evening. oil scandal and the administration's
The crystal ball throws revolving, policy in China and Nicaragua got
multi-colored discs on the floor when into the debates, while the cloak
the colored spotlight is reflected1 rooms overflowed with politics. Not
through it. I even a presidential reminder- this
time a message outlining the Presi-
ARCHITECT TALKS dent's views on flood control- was
AT MENS SMOKERjlacking.
Senate Provides Show.
Outlining the possmbilmtmes ot the If the House did the work, spending
use of color in buildings, and the vari- a trying and monotonous day over
ous complicated phases of lighting the deficiency appropriation bill, it
which have grown up with American was the Senate which provided the
Architecture, Wirt Roland, head de- show, as the senatorial batteries thund-
signer of Smith, Hinchman, and 3 ered away without appreciable ad-
Grylls, a Detroit firm of architects, vance on the Vare election case in
spoke last night at the Architectural I Pennsylvania, crowded galleries look-
smoker held at the Masonic temple. ed oi and long lines of those who
__ ---_-_'could not get in stretched down the
corridors.
PRINCIPALS CON FE Even the senators' private gallery
{{;was jammed, and there were many
privileged visitors on the floor itself.
0 From a front balcony seat Alice Long-
worth, the daughter of Roosevelt,
watched the debate while her hus -
band, the speaker of the house, occu-
Scould be adjusted so as to better pro-piedl a floor seat next to Senator

city limits.
Prof. Felix W. Pawlowski, of the
aeronautical engineering department,
has spoken very highly of the pro-q
posed location, citing it as the ideal
location for an Ann Arbor airport.
CHICAGO.-It has been intimated
that Ray Schalk will manage the Chi-
cago White Sox again in 1928.
S HOPEF UL ATTITUDE
ELIGION OF STUDENTS
the most religious are to be found-
amongst the students and that intel-

Tickets for this party are st
able.
The last Union mnembersh
of the year will be held next
day when a Christmas party
ned. Arrangements are no
way for this party, it was a
yesterday.
STORMS CRIPPLE

ill avaii-
ip dance
W1ednes-
r is plan-

i
i
I

nnouncewl
STATE

Problems Of University Life pare students. for University work. It E Vvsv
With Many Students is believed that by a better coopera- Josephus Daniels, former secretary
tion of Detroit high schools and the of the navy, exercised his prerogative
DOPE TO CONTINUE PLAN University, there will be fewer Detroit as publisher of the Raleigh News and
men failing in their freshman year Observer, and sat in the press gal-
Representatives of 14 Detroit high than ever before. lery. Just above the gallery rail on
schools were the guests of the Uni- Several of the principals brought I the Democratic side was "Uncle Billy"
versity yesterday at a luncheon ten- members of their faculty with them. Wilson, Daniels' colleague for eight
dered them at the Union, and later in They were all exceedingly well pleas- years in the cabinet, and Vare's Demo-
the day conferred with their grad- ed with this opportunity of renewed cratic opponent last year in the Pen-
uates who are freshmen in the Uni- relationship with their former stu- Imnsylvania senatorial election.
versity. The dual purpose of this dents. Many expressed the hope that Senator-designate Vare himself in
meeting of Detroit principals with this experimental meeting would be- a floor seat over in a far corner, the
their former students was to enable come a regular feature each year. Senate argued all day long and a vote
the high school men to better arrange Registrar Ira Smith expressed the be- on the resolution to bar the Pen-
their courses so that students will be lief that the plan would be continued nsylvanian, as Smith of Illinois was
prepared for university work; and it next year due to the success of the barred yesterday, went over until to-
was also believed that conferences meetings held today. Registrar Smith morrow.
+-. +. ,+,,r1-.,-,+t, m ,nmnr far valuahiD turnla novr his office for the use of(-

i
t
i
.
_j.

ligent dissatisfaction with things as( A d s
they are is always the first step to- j DET v . 'r sh
wadsprgrss .DETROIT. Dec. H.-Storms which!r
"Every student who thinks for him- swept the state from the southernI
self is bound to go through a difficult border to the northern portions (u thet
period of adjustment," Thomsen can- Upper Peninsula last night and todayt
inned "connecting new knowledge caused damage estimated at thousands l
wtnned"conectinAllgrnewthknowg of dollars, crippled telephone and
with old beliefs. All growth is slow- tnlo~rrnnh enommninieationn hindered I

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