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December 01, 1927 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-12-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, DECEMBtR 1, 1927.
Al M E g PIRATE CLUB BENEFITS
[.M D lil L THROUGH CUYLER TRADE
. 7£7£1f~n i h"f7 tn'%t'. fUI~i'TIC

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'PAGENP

---------- ....... . ... .. . ............

I

BY TROJN PLAYRS 4
Claim That Decision On Quarterback, }
Fumble Cost Them Victory Over
Iockne-Concied Team1
GRIFFITH UPHOLDS RULING'
(By Associated Press)+
CHICAO, Nov. 30-The touchback
play of the Notre Dame-Southern Cal-!
ifornia football game last Saturday
had added another controversial chap-
ter to the colorful history of Soldier
Field stadium, scene of record-break-I
ing crowds and the "long count" giv-
en Cftmpion Gene Tunney.+
The Southern Californians, when
they landed back home yesterday,
were quoted as saying that the play
should have been called a safety,
which would have given them an 8
to 7 victory over Notre Dame. Instead1
the touchback decision of Umpire
John Schommer, former University of
Chicago star, sent them westward
with a 7 to 6 defeat.
Offilal Rules Touchback
The little Notre Dame quarterback,
Riley, intercepted a Trojan pass neaT
his own goal line, but was tackled and
lost the ball, which was recovered
back of the Notre Dame goal by three+
Trojans. Schommer called-it a touch-
back on, the ground that Riley had
not gained control of the ball before
a hard tackle made him fumble.
Major John L. Griffith, Western
conference athletic commissioner,
several Big Ten football officials, and
other sports authorities agreed with
Schommer's decision, but there were
also those who maintained that Riley
held the ball in his hands long enough
to say he had control of it. All agreed
he had not drawn it tight in his arms
before it flew out of his grasp as the
tacklers hit him.
Seommner Explains Decision
Schommer's statement on the play
after the game, was:
"I was within a few yards of Riley
when he intercepted the Southern
California pass. I was never more on
top of a play in my life. I saw him
grab the ball, juggle it, arl lost it
when tackled. The rules say that be-
fore a ball may: be considered to be
fumbled, the player must have had
possession and control. Riley did not
have possession and control. I could-
n't rule that h fumbled. A touchback
was the only iLnterpretation that I
oould make."
Purdue Cage Team
Starts Drill For
First Twin Battle
(Secial to The Daily)
LAFAYETTE,, Nov. 30.-With the
last rumble of azt.highly successful
football season at Purdue quieting
down into history, sport interest is
shifting to Memo4al gymnasium,
where for several week Coach Ward
Lambert has had his court squad
working "under 'raps."
Full practice was begun this week,
and will continue until the opening
game, or rather, games, with State
Normal here Dee. . The Normal
'tilt will be the first of a "double head-
er" series, other games being arrang-
eded in similar fashion with Wabash,
Butler and Franklin.
Five Lettermen On Squad
Five lettermen, Capt. Babe Wheeler,
Bob Wilson, Wilbur Cummins, Cotton
Wilcox and Harry Kemmer, are back
for the squad. Wilcox, however, will
not be out for several weeks, and per-
haps not until after the holidays be-
cause of a football injury.
Wheeler and Wilson are forwards,
Cummins, a center who led the Big
I'en in scoring last year and Wilcox
and Kemmer are guards. Other men
from last year's squad who will be
available are Clyde Lyle, forward,
Lawrence; Allen Stevenson, center,
Rockville; Benny Linkemer, guard,

Michigan City.
Sophomore Candidates Promising
About 13 sopohomores from last
year's freshman squad are expected
to make competition for Varsity jobs
keen, and should provide needed re-
serve strength for Purdue's hardest
schedule in years. John Eckert, Vic-
tor Gibbens and Harold Thomas, are
forwards. Glenn Harmeson, football
star, will report within a few weeks
as a forward. Charles Murphy, the
tallest man who has ever appeared
on a Purdue squad, looks promising
at center, as does Robert Daniels.
All-American Dope
(Continued from Page Eight.)
should have the inside track.
It is scarcely fair to consider such
men as Wilson, Hewitt, and others on
the Army eleven who have held places
on college teams prior to entering the
service and have i'ow played t I
fifth, sixth, or seventh year c inter-
collegiate football.
L - r
There are several exceptions to
this on the Army team, and if we
are not wrong, Cagle, wonder
back who spelled disaster to
Notre Dame, is one. In this case,
he should be at the top. Lloyd
of Navy is consistently good too.

AC UKRINU TIULAIT!KSZ
(By Associated Press)
NEW YORK, Nov. 30-The corcen-
sus of baseball managers and critics
in the metropolis is that Joe McCar-
thy, manager of the Chicago Cubs,
outsmarted himself in trading Sparky
Adams andl Pete Scott to the Pitts-
burg Pirates in exchange ')r KIki
Cuyler.
"I think the Pirates got all the
better of the deal," said John Mc-
Graw, manager of the New York
Giants. "Adams is a dangerous ball
player, always getting on base, and
with a hard hitting team like the Pi-
rates behind him, he will bother
pitchers more than ever. There is a
question whether Cuyler is as good as
he used to be. He failed in the pinch;s
many times last season'"
"The :Virates seem to have received
a lot for nothing," Ed Barrow, gen-
eral manager of the Now York Yan-
kees said. "They have fortified them-
selves where they needed help and
where a glaring weakness developed
in the world series and they lost no
strength because they could not use
Cu y.ler.
George Stallings, former "Miracle
Man" of the Boston Braves in 1914
and new manager of Montreal in the
International league, said: " I can
see one reason why the Cubs made
the deal. McCarthy may be looking
for added batting strength, with
Stephenson, Cuyler and Wilson com-
ing up in a row."
On the other hand, "Derby Bill"
Clyner, manager of Buffalo in the In-
ternational league, thought Pitts-
burgh got all the worst of the deal.
"They gave him away," he said. "I
could have gotten a ball club for him
and players besides."
TAD WIEMAN TO MAKE
LONG SPEAKING TOUR
(Continued from Page Eight.)tf
night he will be the speaker at the
annual football meeting given by the
Bay City Kiwanis club for the Central
high school grid team.
Coach Wieman will conclude his
speaking tour by addressing the Do-
troit alumni annual football bust onj
Saturday, Dec. 10, The entire Michi-
gan football team will be guests at
this affair.

D WASHING S WANTED-Work expert-
L ASIFE-ai~l
A S~j1E ly dlone. Laundlered when you want
Advertising it lone. Call 4420. 62, 63, 64
NOTICES. LOST
NOTICE-We deliver between the LOST-German Police Dog, black
hours of 9:30 and 11:30 p m. Prompt with tan markings. If found, call
Delivery. Barbecue Inn. Phone 4481. 21917. 61, 62, 63
20 100 ----
LOST-Pair of glasses in black case,
EAT a bit, dance a bit; any after-; at Majestic Theatre. Reward. Call
noon, 2 to 4. Karolyn Kitchen, 213 9557. 61, 62, 63
So Fifth Ave. 61, 62, 63 -- -___________ _____
LOST-Fur-lined grey gloves, on
WANTED Campus, Tuesday morning. Phone
WANTED-Gara to rent3 near 170 5332. 62

_. n

I

t,
t

W A ' !-xEt'ge Wfl, et '
Washtenaw. J. M. O'Neil. Dial 8933.
62, 63

WANTED TO BUY - Two

tandemI

bicycles. Also three boy's bicycles
either 24 or 26 inch rims. Call 9142,
between 4 and 9 p. m. L. D. Bates,
132 Hill Street. 60-61-62

LOST-On Campus, Rider Pen, with
name Donald Ring on it. Phone
8123. Reward. 62, 63, 64, 65, 66
LOST-Black leather grained travel-
ing bag, after Minnesota game, near
Chi Omega, at Washtenaw. Box 15.
Reward. 62, 63, 64, 65

"The Home of Hart Schaffner and Marx"
Copyright 1027 Hart Schaffner & Mart
AND INTO THE HOLIDAT.
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the demands of a nexalting public.
Exclusive numbers in silk lounging robes, Florida wool
and blanket robes. Silk and cassimere scarfs in very pleasing
combinations.
Striking patterns in slip-over pajamas and shirts that tell
you how good they are.
"HANSEN GLOVES" in many new skins, some un-
lined, others lined with Australian wool and lamb skin.
And a wonderful array of smart neckwear.
If You Haven't Seen Those "OXFORD GREYS"
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WATCH OUR WINDOWS
CONLIN and WETHERBEE
118 E. Washington

NEWER SHADES
IN NECK WEAR

T H E

COLORS

FOR THIS

of Notre Dame is a big favorite
along with Hibb, the Trojan,
Hanson of Minnesota, and Web-
ster, Eli leader.

FALL ARE BRIGHT-IN-
TENDED TO LIVEN UP A
DARK SUIT AND YET ARE
CAREFULLY DESIGNED SQ
A S NOT TO APPEAR AT
ALL EXTREME.
THESE TIES ARE MADE
FROM THE BEST OF MA-
TERIALS AND ARE DIS-
PLAYED FOR YOU AT THE
MOST REASONABLE PRIC-

1l

Ray Baer, Wolverine sylph, is re-
ceiving consideration as he has a
great record. Looking for stars
among the Illini is a favorite pastime
and Crane, guard, having caught
Rice's eye on several occasions as in-
dicated in "Sportlight," may receive
high mention.

IF - I

You'll
like
P"A" -

'if
ts;
l4f
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J/
{ . A-.=.

4.

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as
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4-
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,L .

ES.

OUR MATERIALS IN-

V

Ia nd how!
OPEN a tidy red tin of Prince
Albert and give your olfactory
nerve a treat. Never have you
niet an aroma that had: so much
came-and-get-it. Some fragrance,
Fellows. And that's just a starter.
Load up and light up... .

One of the first things you
notice about P. A. is that it never
bites your tongue or parches your
throat, no matter how wide you
open the smoke-throttle. It is
one tobacco that never wears out
its welcome. You can .stoke and
smoke to your heart's content,
with P. A. for packing. Get some
Prince Albert now and get going!

CLUDE ROYAL IRISH POP-
LIN MOGADOR IMPORTED
REPS AND- CUT SILKS.
Whenever you have a few
free minutes drop in and
let us show you these new-
er stripes and also the
plain colors.
iS
I
of
1 _1 Tl 1 _

f

Cool as final exams.

Sweet as

passing. Mild as cafe au lait -
mild, but with that rich, full-

bodied flavor

that bangs your

smoke-gong right on the nose on
every fire-up. You'll like this long-
burning Prince Albert in the bowl
of a pipe, And how.

P. A. is sold every-
where in tidy red tins,
pound and half-pound
tin humidors, and
pound crystal-glass
humidors with sponge-
moistener top. And
always. with every bit
of bite and parch re-
moved by the Prince
dlber process.

I A v uuww "AwRL W III 11

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