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November 30, 1927 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-11-30

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0

PAGE SIB

THE MICHIGAN DAIS Y

AVETI\ESDAY, -.NOVEMTIFR ^0, 1927,

T~AG1~J SIX THE MICHIGAN DAI'LY WEb~ESDAY, NOVEMI3J~R 30, 1~2?

HARVA RD

AND

MICHIGAN

MAY

MEET

1N

GRIDIRO.N

2

ENDEAVOR T REACHCYLE T PLAY Track Candidat RETURN OF HARRIAN
fii r s r r r. FO Rre r - CUBS IN 1928 old First [hill EU 0

DOPING T

MUTUAL AUREEMENT

Rujiior Of Contet Between Wolverines
And Crimson Follows President
Little's Eastern Trip
DIFFICULT TO SET DATE
Only the agreement upon actual
playing dates prevents the lefinite
consummation ot the tentative nego-
tiations between Michigan and Har-
vard authorities who confess a mutual
and extreme anxiety for a series of
football games etween tiA two insti-
tutions-but such agreement presents
a distressing dilemma.
Such was the implication of the
brief statement issued yesterday by
Fielding I. Yost, director of intercol-
legiate athletics: "Negotiations are
under way and lave been under way
for some time, but to date no agree-
ment between Harvard and Michigan
has been reached."
Rumors following President Clar-
ence Cook Little's recent trip through
the East influenced the New York
World to announce yesterday that the
teams have taken favorably to the
idea of their meeting, but that no con-
tracts had as yet been signed.
Several severe obstacles to a com-
promise upon the actual playing dates
exist.
If the home and home series was to
be played in 1928 and 1930 arrange-
Ments would be more easily agreed
upon than if the series was to be play-
ed in 1929 and 1930, this because of
the strenuous Michigan schedule al-
ready carded for 1929.
Michigan has six Conference tilts
listed for 1929, while the difficulty in-
volved in a 1928 meeting is almost as
great, this although the Wolverines
still have two open dates for that
year.
Despite the open dates, Oct. 13 and
Nov. 17, it is improbable that either
will be utilized for a game with Har-
vard. In the first place the highly
desired Harvard trip to Ann Arbor,
madenecessary, in fact, by the Wol-
verines' trip to Baltimore to meet the
,Navy, is forbidden by a rule at the
Cambridge institution which allows
only one contest out of. town in each
year. Since Harvard meets Yale at
New Haven next year, the rule would
either have to be rescjnded or negotia-
tions be dropped.
Moreover the game could hardly be
played on Oct. 13, obviously too early
for so important a game, inasmuch as
the traditional Michigan State contest,
now even more assured than ever with
the appointmept of Harry Kipke, en-
deared Wolverine hero, as coach at
Lansing, is usually played at approxi-
mately-that time.1

With the close of the croscount. LSIERS A E T[A
season Coach Stephen J. Farrell, ve -
eran Michigan track and harrier men-
Pcrfornin ce Of Court Star ai
tor, has turned his attention to con- 1cfrine% 'ui~1i : sk
t , s tirne ive itnti ctoa 1 Spectators That Ile Has Lost
ditioning the Wolverine track candi- ~J'~~I,' htlehsL'
dates for the coming indoor season le Of His Proless
in daily workouts in the field house.~- -
At the present time approximately STERBAAN REPORTS
160 men have signed up for track ---
lockers and it is expected that this Intererii'g ifatur of the' past
numb~er will be considlerablly incr eas- reveln weeks' dx illing of the V arsity
0( before the tpreliminary trainiug I;s1atball squad were quite entirely
period is ended just before the Christ- forgotten (uring yesicrday's workoit
innsrecss.at Yost r eld house when Frank H~ar-t
Although the fiist official call for trigan ace ot last season's chapion-
.*.:::::>:::::candidates was not issued until this ii nte, a r so>i)O1 imosc°Ilie at-
week, a considerable number of men tention o coaches onlooers, 1 es-
have been working out in the field pecially the opposing squad of "Phi
house for some time. Regular prac- Beta Kappas."
-~ Lice was begun Monday andI will con- Hlarrigan', performance in the brief
tinn~e, according to Coach Farrell, tin- I periodi in which he was in the lineup
til just before the holiday recess be- satisfied cage enthusiasts that he has
gins. T'he men will renew intensive lost none of his former prowess in the
training immediately following the matter of evading hostile guards,
> k vacation period for the indoor sea- tossing baskets, and playin his usual
L A E- C-Y ER- son. whirlwind floor game.
Who has been traded to the Chica- Several stars from last year's fresh- Not In Condition Yet.
go Cubs by Pittsburgh in exchange man squad are expected to make Teamed with McCoy at center. Chap-
strong bids for the vacancies left by man and Kanitz at guard, and Rose at
for Sparky Adams, infielder, and the graduation of several veterans ofi forward, Harrigan was no little factor
Scott, an outfielder. last year's team. in the (ecisive beating administered to
the "Phi Beta Kappas," Myron, Walsh,
Chicago Cubs Receive Cuyler, Pittsburgh -lan , ig, aand;ae"c o"2mm ony
Star In Excha1nge For Scott And A'damsbiniation to oppose the tentative first
tar, Exchoice in practice.
It was evident, however, that

'HE DOPE [LONG RUNS FEATURE
,dagame with t inon foe iNATION'S GRID GAMES
woalIld likely a how a stubborn foe
for Mlichigan. Season Of 1927 Provides Thrills For

3A newv lighlt was thrown oW the
problem of what. iteam wiltill t he
hIlne remainilig open ( ate oii the 'N Il-
%'erine I928 5(110( , w hei it was
lI arned that ncgotiations, :, ill incom-
pletle, were being carrie l 0 Tn ith
Harvard.
Four i imue since Michigan gwan
;,laying foot bal I adi once since l)i-
: ctor Yost came to A an Arbor have
Crimson aggregations met the Ma-ire
Sand Blue teams and on each occasion
have they emerged victors.
The Wolverines have yet to
score a point on the ers while
"pride of the East," but Harvard
has only chalked up 18 points in
winning the four games.;
In 1881 Mlichig an bowed by a 4.(0
score and two years later in a t-0
game. 1895 the "Johnnies" gained an-
other 4-0 win while they beat the
Yostmen in 1914 in a 7-0 tussle which
saw Maulbetsch, all-American half-
back, tearing the Harvard line tao
pieces, but to no avail.
Since those imperion: days of Fear-
vard gridiron history the Cambridl-
scepter has been sna ehed rudei
away but the prestige has remained.
Now, under Arnold lforce-n, ei arva il

i

t.

h Football Followers Through
'ile proposed arrangement cells Open Style Of Play
fior hone-and-lione games in a '
two-wear nes and if consuin- WELCH RUNS 97 YARDS
a ill bring tle ".Johnnies''
on their first M\iddle Western in- (By Associated Press)
vas51011. NEW YORK, Nov. 29.-Wide open
So>ald the sous f ,John harvard play, 1927 style, which sentWA running
l' Ojponenit 0ofi higehan next year rattle of upsets, resounded from coast
. will be the tirst it with an eastern
college since 1918 if one excepts the to coast from early September to late
ilMarins and Navy, service elevens. I Novenber this year, provided an ar-
taz~t ea 4yraiiaae asttothe i~lray of running and passing thrills sel-
that year Sy'racuse lost, to the W-(lo- if ever equalled in the rein of
veuiies, 13-0. the ruling college sport, king foot-
Accordingi to records wh-ic~h have ball.
been dui; up 110 I 3ijg Th1ree eleven has November 12 alone saw nine' big
meot Mician, except larvard, since time backs turn in a total distance of
the advent of "Yostism." The only 690 yards on 10 plays, every dash good
gaines shown, on the records between for a touchdown.
Michigan arnd Yale were played in j That day Dartmouth's sopohomore
1881 and 1883, while Princeton has find, Al Marsters, conducted two spe-
met the Wolverines only once, in 1881. cial tours against Cornell, one for 80
3 yards and the other for 50. Grim of
But there are obstacles yet to Ohio State, broke through Denison
be hurdled before the renewal of with a 90 yard run and Whitey Lloyd
rivalry with the iBig Three of the Navy took in an 85 yard dash
through the medium of a Hlar- against Michigan. Gibby Welch of
yard series may become a reali- Pittsburg's undefeated Panthers, gal-
' ty. loped 97 yards through Nebraska.

[f i .11 111

Rumbles in the major league base- has yet been chosen to succeed Jack "Skipper's" star was in no condition to
ball market were heard yesterday McAllister. . last more than the 15 minutes in which
vith the announcement that Hazen The trading of Cuyler by the Pirate he was utilized. After his withdrawal
management was expected, but his in favor of Rabe and latr, Gawne,
(Kiki) Cuyler, the temperamental destination was unknown. The trou- I the first choices, or "Blues" were
young Pittsburgh outfielder, had been ble concerning Cuyler dates baick to pitted against another group composed
traded to the Chicago Cubs for Earl the middle of last season, when Man- of Schroeder, Balsamo, Murphy,
Adams and Floyd Scott. No money ager Donie Bush suspended him for Lovell, and Daniels.
was involved in the transaction. failure to obey orders. Cuyler sat on Blues Are Defeated.
Two veteran hitchers of the champ- the bench during the remainder of This latter combination severely
ion New York Yankees, Bob Shaw- the season, and, did not play in the drubbed the "Blues" by a 17-6 margin,
keynd Ne c Yueheshwere given world's series, largely through the great work of Mur-
their unconditional release by Miller Adams, who goes to the Pirates, phy and Schroeder, making even more
Huggins, having outlived their use has been playing with the Cubs since vident the patent fact that Harrigan,
funess with the Yanks. The develop- 1922. He is regarded as one of the although participating in his first in-
ntss Wilcy Moreand Gere Pilp- most dependable shortstops in the Na- tensive scrimmage of the year and
mnt of Wiley Moore and George Pip-ton egu.Stthsbnautiy not fit for prolonged action, was still
'gras last season was probably one of tional league. Scott has been a utility no itfr lone cin a tl
e player since he joined the Chicago the Harrigan of old, the bulwark of
the chief causes for their passing team two years ago. attack and defense, this although he
from the big leagues. ddie Collins, another ex-Chicago- did appear more or less awkard upon
Evans Leaves Umpires an, has come to terms with Connie at least one occasion.
Along with these baseball trades Mack, manager of the Athletics. The Oosterbaan also rejoined the squad
comes the passing of another veteran m yesterday, his return marking the
from the major leagues, for Billy Ev- former White Sox pilot will act a- asteplayer expected from the football
ans, popular American league um- general assistant to Mack next sea-.squad, but the great grid captain was
pire will not be calling balls and son. He played irregularly last year.not injected to the scrimmage at
strikes next season. But he has not I I al. Nyland and Whittle, also of the
permanently left the diamond sport, TRACKMEN NTICE football squad and AMA winners in
for he will assume the post of gen- l basketball, were used in the final
eral manager of the Cleveland base- All men holding lockers in scrimmage of the afternoon.
ball 'club. In this capacity he will 7 Yost field house under the head
undertake many of the duties former- "track department" will report MONTRAL-Canada will enter a
ly performed by E. S'. Barnard, newly for practice this week. team intthe Davis Cup matches next
appointed president of the junior cir- Coach Stephen J. Farrell year in spite of reports o the con-
suit. No manager for the 1928 Indians I trary.
VI '. ...'-±

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style that

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