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November 27, 1927 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-11-27

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ESTABLISHED
1890

Yr

*11

ait0

MEMBER
PRESS

VOL. XXXVIII, No. 59. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1927.

EIGHT PAGES

ARMY DEFEATS NAV BRNS ASSAILED
IRI [JL NAVY8JlBkY GOVERNMENT

IN THRILLING BATTLE
BEFORE VAST CROWD
VICTORS COME FROM BEHIND IN
SECOND HALF TO SCORE
TWICE
CADETS TRIUMPH 14 TO 9
3ildsliiptuen Outplay Rivals During All
Of First Half And Put Over
Touchdown in Last
(Special to'The Daily)
POLO GROUNDS, NEW YORK, Nov.
26.-Rallying from a poor start, Army
conquered the Navy today, 14 to 9, un-
der the indominitable leadership of
the blond and battling cadet, Capt.
"Lighthorse" Harry Wilson.
While a colorful, wildly yelling
crowd of 76,000 looked on, Wilson
pulled his wabbly team together be-
tween halves, came out to lead a
charge that twice crossed the Navy
goal line, and then stand foremost in a
defense that checked the desperate
and dangerous closing spurts of the
sailors.
Army's victory over a gallant team
that played superior football in all but
the second period was a personal
triumph for the veteran Wilson play-
ing his last year for the Army and his}
seventh against the Navy in a Varsity 1
career that began in 1921 at Penn,
State. It was Wilson who plunged in
and tackled with his forwards as they
put up a stonewall defensive barrier
in the first half, beaten back and once
yielding a safety on a blocked kick,
but also twice stopping the Navy at
the threshhold of the goal line. Once,
the Middies were turned back with
only five yards to go, but even mores
disheartening, in the second period,1
was the Navy's thrust that was stopped
by the Cadets only a foot short of *a
touchdown.
Wilson Is Star
t was Wilson who came trotting out
in the second half to lead a thrust that
turned the tide and clinched the game.
"Lighthorse" Charlie was a whirling
dervish as he took a Navy punt on the
latter's 46-yard line to dash 18 yards,k
then carried the ball across the Mid-
die's goal in five successive dashes.
Sidestepping and straightarming, Wil-
son frequently took three or four
tacklers along with him, as he reeled
offff 28 yards to the goal line.
With the winning spark thus ignited,
"Red" Cagle, fleet running mate of
the Army captain, grabbed opportun-
ity-in the form of an intercepted pass
-and raced 36 yards to the Navy's 4-
yard mark. It took only two bucks
by Wilson to put the ball over and

I

GOVERNMENT COUNSEL IOWA PROFESSOR
' i i L UN10LL TO SPEAK HERE
1I ITHDf IDr. Lee Edwin Travis, associate
IIII1UUU~t)5~RPI5E professor of speech at the University
of Iowa and director of the speech
Eclinic at that university, will deliver
!IN OL SC4 D41.a regular University lecture here on
IN L SCANDAL C S Monday, Dec. 12,o Tuesday, ec. 13,
it was announced yesterday by Dr. ,
WILL ISSUE 75 SUBPOENAS FOR Frank Robbins, assistant to the Pres-
NEW WITNESSES OF ident.
GOVERNMENT Dr. Travis is brought here under
the auspices of the department of
CITES PROMINENT FIGURES! speech aid according to Prof. James
O'Neill is one of the best known men

... .. ,.. ,. I
:r w

LEADER

OF PHILIPPINE I

William J. Burns
Head of the detective agency which
bears his name, who was one of the
victims of a surprise maneuver enact-
ed by government counsel in yester-
days' litigation in the Fall-Sinclair'
contempt case.
LAIIOiEYHNR
vI VFr V PV M[aMOmI

District Attorney May Use Burns Men
To Prove Contempt Of Court
Had Been Committed
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, Nov. 26-Springing=
a surprise in the contempt proceed-
ings against Harry F. Sinclair, weal-
thy oil operator, W. J. Burns, founder
of the Burns Detective agency an(.
four of their associates, District At-
torney Gordon began today the prep-
aration of approximately 075 subpoen-
as calling as government witnesses
nearly every person who testified
during the grand jury investigation
into the charges of tampering with
the Fall-Sinclair oil conspiracy jury.
Sinclair, Burns, the oil man's con-
fidential associate, Henry Mason Day
of New York, and Sheldon Clarke of
Chicago, W. Sherman Burns, mana-
ger of the Burns agency, and C. L.

I]
ii

R LLU L M U1I1111111U I MiL Veisch, Burns' Baltimore manager,E
have been cited to appear before Jus-i
.aertice Siddons in the District of Colum-
Poem In Latin Express Appreciation bia Supreme court Dec. 5 to show
InrCausk OfaThresurs rcause why they should not be pun-
I Cause Of Thesaurus ished for centempt of court.a
Government Makes Charge
GROUP DOES GREAT WORK The government charged in its pe-I
tition upon the rule of contempt wasN
The Latin Thesaurus association, issued that Sinclair sent Day andt
with headquarters at Munich, Ger- Sheldon to Washington where theyI
many, has honored the late Prof. engaged the Burns Detective agency!
Francis Kelsey of the archaeology and "to spy upon, to bribe and intimidate t
and to do anything calculated to in-N
Latin departments by the publication terfere with and impede" the Fall-
of a memoriam, it was learned here Sinclair jurors in the unbiased dis-t
yesterday with the receipt by Dr. charge of their duties. It was furtherI
Frank Robbins, assistant to the Presi- charged that the purpose of the sur-.
ofe.memorial p veillance of the jury was "to impede,1
dent, of one of them pervert and prevent the due adminis-
cations. The memorial is in the form tration of justice in the court eithe,
ortf fYutc i h outete
of an engraved card, and has been by corruptly influencing such purors1
sent to many prominent classical to decide the issue of said prosecution'1
schdearsh miin favor of the defendants or to dis-
poem in Latin expressing appreciation agree as to said issues" and that "in
em i Lain epre geaprecase such a course should seem ad- 1
of the work which Professor Kelsey cs uhacus hudse d
did for the Thesaurus association, and cantageous, to said defendants in saidI
regret at his death. cause" to bring "about a mistrial" of
The main inscription, in Latin, the case.
reads: "In Memoriam... .Francisci W. In calling government witnesses
Kelsey. Professoris Universitatis those who appeared before the grand
Michiganae ....PR..ID ....Mai .... jury, the District attorney's office let.
A.D. MCMXXVII." it be -known for the first time that
Has Other Inseription it would use the Burns operatives in
Following the main inscription is a attempting to prove that contempt of
poem in Latin expressing appreciation court had been committed. The Burns
of the work which Professor Kelsey detectives carried on the shadowing
did for the cause of the Thesaurus and of the trial jury, and their reports.
also expressing regret at his death. seized by the district attorney, dis-
nla d fi f 4 o iA r n ,. n 1

in his field. He will speak on "The
Place of Speech Correction in Modern
Education."
DPERA TICKETS TO BE,
PUT ON GENERAL SALEI
lill Open General Sale To Public
For All Local Performances
At Whitney Theater
WILL START TOMORROW
General sale of tickets for all local
performances of the 22nd annual
Michigan Union opera, "The Same To
You," will begin tomorrow, according
to announcement made today by Paul
Buckley, general manager of the Un-
ion. The sale will continue through
Wednesday.
The purposes of the general sale
are to enable all those who have no
connection with the Union, opera, or
University to obtain tickets for the
Whitney performances, or tl Ise of
the student body who have been in-
cluded in the various classifications
but have negfected to obtain applica-
tions thus far. "The Same To You"
will open in the Whitney theater on
Monday night, Dec. 5, and will run
throughout the week with a matinee
on Saturday. The road trip will be
undertaken during the Christmas hol-
idays and will carry the Opera to
many of the principal cities of the
East and Middle West. Chicago will
be played on Friday hight, the day
that schools closes in all schools
and colleges of the University.
The general sale will take place at
the box office in Hill auditorium be-
ginning Thursday, Dec. 1. Applica-
tions for all those directly connected
with the opera organization werq
mailed out .some time ago, and were
followed by those for all fully paid
life members, including many alumni
in this class. Participating life mem-
bers of the Union were able to se-
cure their applications more than a
week ago, and the privilege is still
open. This includes almost every
male student in school. All those
having applications now are urged to
doi tlhm in inimdliatel if thev

I

SENATE WILL DELIVER
INDEPENDENCE SPEECH
WAS ELECTED MEMBER OF FIRST
ASSEMBLY FOR ISLANDS
DURING 1907
SERVED WITH AGUINALDO
Lxpect Quezon To Clarify Statements
Concerning Diversified Views
In Lecture Tomorrow
Manuel L. Quezon, president of the
Philippine senate, will delive a lec-j
ture at 4:15 tomorrow in the Natural
Science auditorium. He is to speak on
"Philippine Independence."
Quezon is one of the foremost fig-
ures in Philippine politics. He began
his career as a lieutenant-colonel in
General Aguinaldo's army. In 1907 he,
was elected to a membership in the
first Philippine assembly, and after
serving there for several years, he
became one of the two commissioners
that have a seat in the United States
Congress. While in office he was
largely responsible for the passing of
the Jones act, which serves as the.
Philippine constitution. When the
first senate was organized he return-
ed and was chosen president in which
office he has served until the pres-
ent.
He has always been a strong ad-
Ivocate of complete and unqualified
independence, so it was with great
surprise that he recently made a
statement favoring a mutually advan-
tageous -arrangement whereby both
countries should receive that which
they most desire. When interviewed
concerning these remarks he stated
that his latest ideas were not incom-
1 patible with his views on permanent
independence.
Excited Wonder
Many people are wondering exactly
what Quezons means and it is ex-
pected that he will clarify his stand
in his speech tomorrow. The thoughts
are even more confusing since he
emphatically states that he wants.
self government and equally emphat,
ically says that he does not mean
to sever relationship with America.
Since the death of Governor-Gener-
al Leonard Wood the question of
Philippine independence has become
a even more vital. For over three
months the Philippines have had n
head, and Congress has not as yet
1met to decide who will get the posi-
tion.
There is a new period in the Philip
pines since Governor-General Woo
IIdied, and what the trend of politic,
will take depends largely on who h
elected governor-general. It is partly
for this reason that Quezon is it
America. He has spent several weeks

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I

ALENS TO HOLD
CHRISTMAS DRIVE
A drive for funds for the purpose of
oviding Christmas gifts ad a
hristmas party for the children con-
ed in the University hospital will be
adertaken this week by members of
alens, honorary medical society, it
as announced yesterday by Glenn
armichael, '28M, chairman of the pro-
ct. The drive wvill take the form of
vo tag days, to be held Thursday and
riday o' this week, and the members
the organization hope to raise $400
)r the purpose.
An endeavor to reach all students
ill be made during the two days of
e tag day, and it is hoped by officers
f the organization that the student
ody vill co-operate in the project.
'he money will be used to give all of
he children at the hospital on Christ-
as day a party and gifts. No regular
rrangements for such a program have
ver been made before.
The definite places from which tags
ay be secured on Thursday and Fri-
ay have not been determined, but an-
ouncement of exact plans will be
ade early this week.
;HINESE NATIONALISTS'
iEPORT BIG VICTORIES
thiang Kai-Shek Predicts Capture 0
Peking If Nationalists Are
Able To Unite
NORTHERNERS DRIVEN OUT
(By Associated Press)
SHANGHAI, Nov. 26--Sweeping Na-
ionalist victories which resulted in
:iving the Northerners from the pro-
vinces of Honan, Anhwei and Kiang
u were announced officially today b3
he Nanking Nationalist Military
ouncil.
Gen. Chang Tsung-chang, one-tim
Northern defendeir of Shanghai, was
reported to have been wounded it
he leg while commanding the North'
ern armies, and to have been fore
o retire to Tsinanfu, capital of th
province of Shantung, and to have en
ered a hospital.
Gen. Chiang Kai-shek, one-tim
generalissimo of the united National
st forces, now is acting as peacemak
er between the various Nationalis
factions. He was quoted todayt a
saying: "Unification neans that t
capture of Peking is assured."
A formal conference of the Kuom
intang, or Nationalist political organ
ization, seeking to consolidate tth
Canton and Nanking factions i
scheduled for Dec. 3. It is stated tha
the Cantonese will propose a sweep
ing scheme to disband the factiona
governments and replace them wit
a single authority representing al
factions.
LAUDS FINANCING
OF FRATERNITIES
(By Associated Press)
NEW YORK, Nov. 26-The busines
abilty of American college boys i
financing construction and operatio
of fraternity houses was compare
favorably to thatshown by the n
tion's business men.
ArthurR. Priest, executive of th
Phi Theta Delta at DePauw' univem
sity, Greencastle, Ind., told the ar
nual Inter-Fraternity conference th
the "percentage of business failure
among these houses is no higher tha
among average business establish
ments.

IS PRINCETON PROFESSOR
Theologian has Held Many Prominent
Positions In Presbyterian Circles
Of Country
Dr. Charles R. .Erdman, pastor of
Ithe First Presbyterian church, Prince-
ton, N. J., will deliver the address of
the second of the fall series of student
convocations to be held at 11 o'clock
this morning in Hill auditorium. The
subject upon which Dr. Erdman will
talk is ""The Quest For the Chief
Good."
Dr. Erdman, one of the leading lib-
eral ministers ofnthe United States, is
one of the favored speakers of the
east. Not only has he distinguished
himself for his work with his pastor-
ates, but he has also taken a promin-
ent part in the work of the national
organization of the Presbyterian
church, having held the position of
moderator of the church. He also held
the position of moderator of the Pres-
bytery of New Brunswick in 1925.
Is Widely Known
Known throughout the United States
as a leader in the application of prac-
tical theology to the problems of the
world, Dr. Erdman's activities in the
pulpit have not been his sole claim to
fame. He has produced many books
dealing with his subject. These have
stirred considerable comment upon
their appearance and have marked
their author as a man of vision. Be-
ing an upholder of the liberal view of
religion and believing in the place of
religion in everyday life, Dr. Erdman
s has been able to appeal to all classes
1of people.
Dr. Erdman has a particular appeal
for the student mind, interested in
bringing the problems of religion to
- bear upon the problems of life and of
living. Recently when the students of
Princeton were asked to ballot for
their favorite minister, Dr. Erdman
won by anoverwhelming majority. He
tis the father-in-law of Rev. Henry
Lewis, pastor of the St. Andrews Epis-
' copal church in this city, and in ad-
dition to his. position as pastor, he is
also a professor of practical theology
in the Princeton Theological seminary.
e Graham To Sing
The soloist for the convocation will
be Robert Graham, 28' S of M, and his
accompanist will be Cassius Jolly, of
hthe Schmool of Music. Members of va-,
l rious honor societies on the campus
will act as ushers.
At the next convocation to be held
Sunday, Dec. 4, Hon. Newton D. Baker,
ex-secretary of war, will be the speak-
I er. Baker, held a foremost place in
legal practice in the city of Cleveland,
having held the position of city solic-
s itor for 10 years, and the office ofk
n mayor for 4 years. He was appointed
n Secretary of War by Woodrow Wilson
d in 1916 and served in that capacity
-until 1921.
All plans for the convocation are in
e the hands of a special committee ap-
pointed by President Clarence Cook
- Little. This committee is assisted in
at its counsels and work by Dr. Frank E.
,s Robbins, assistant to the president of
4 the University, and James Inglis, a
- member of the board of trustees of the
Michigan School of Religion.

ERDMAN WILL DELIVER
ADDRESS FOR SECOND
CONVOCATION SERVICE

IS

ONE OF LEADING LIBERALS
NOW PREACHING IN THE
UNITED STATES

L
t

Cagle's toe added the extra point for The text of the poem follows: cosed that they nadK ept up an in- Senat hem 111 OCII nILUILI m IueyLy
the second time. "h fvit adivtor Thesavro sponte tensive surveilase. save not done so, in orderto isure in Washington, and after speaking
___________________I LatinoI Will Disclose flames !them a choice before the general hrh ilg oCiaoweeh
"Rebvs in adversis avxilivmqve When the grand jury witnesses test sale opens. will address the Foreign Relation
Notre Dane-Southern California . "Dilectis stvdiis mors abstvhit atra tify at the contempt hearing the evi- T'he prices for the tickets this council.
An account of the Notre Dame- dence collected by the district attor- year are $3 for the baxes and entireClub To Entertain
ISouthern California game will be vigentem meoipcoa dnecletdTytedsrchto-ya ae$ o h ae n ni e Michigan-Philippine club is
"Vivit qvem memori pectora ney against those cited for contempt main floor, and $2.50, $2.00, and $1.50 The
found on page six. (( corde colvnt." will be disclosed. for the various balcony locations .Ap- giving a dinner at 8 o'clock tomorrowv
The Latin Thesaurus association, These witnesses include Charles G. plications for the out of town per- night for Quezon and Rafael Palma,
It was just as well for the Navy according to Dr. Robbins, is an or- Ruddy, manager of the Burns Phila- formances will be distributed shortly. president of the University of the
Phlppns.4_emeshaddb
that they produced this second period ganization which has for its purpose delphia office whoydirected the shad- DonatoW Syat,'2sdwimb pasrtaedpate.
scoring punch, for they had been out-ti spi ot r a . EDMPalma is also an outstanding per-
played decisively by the Midshipmen dictionary, to include the meanings of ernor Pinchot of Pennsylvania, to A T TEND SESSIO sonality in the Philippines. He has
in the first half and in the final quar- ! all Latin words from usage. For this whom W. J. McMulin disclosed what ATTEND SESIONSj soa~litenpreint the Ulipnesityefor
ter they were menaced by a Navy- purpose an immense filing system has the government charged was a plot to -
coeback that neted one touchdon been installed at Munich, where the bring about a mistrial. McMullin, who Dr. J. B. Edmonson, director of the five years, before which time he was
comeback that netted one touchdown has its headquarters and the while working on the case as an division of University inspection of secretary of state and a member of
whistle blew.d nusesof the various words are cata- j operative of the Burns agency, be- high schools and professor of second- pthe senate. He is on a trip around
Nhisaocorlogued as they are found. Probably came a government informer and ary education in the School of Educa- the world visiting the great educa-
This Navy cowrowneseInopoect with the exception of the kept the district attorney's office in tion, has left for Atlantic City where 1tional institutions. The school which
brigade of Midshipmen into hysterical English Oxford dictionary has at- touch with the Burns plans, probably he will speak at one of the sessions of he heads is very similar to the Uni-
bigemof Masthependintohyeraetempted such an exhaustive classifica- will be the most important witness. the Association of Colleges and Sec- versity of Michigan, primarily be-
neared, was accomplished by a spec- tion of words, and at the close of the McMullin charged that at the di- ondary Schools of the Middle States eure motlyh Michignts and deans
tacular forward pass. Hurled by World war, due to economic extremity rection of Burns officials he prepared and Maryland. e The subject on which Quezon will
"Whitie" Lloyd from near midfield, it of Germany, the continuation of the a false affidavit intended to bring From Atlantic City, Professor Ed-pekIs on hihsuerynvill
was grabbed by Ted Sloane, former work was seriously threatened for about a mistrial in the case by show- mondson will go to Jacksonville, Fla., speak is one that he is very vitally
Drake end, who sped across the goal ack of adequate funds. ing that a juror had been approached where he will speak at one of the s interested in, and as he has an x-
line to complete the most thrilling Kelsey Aided by a government employee. The affi- ionss of the Association of Colleges guage he is expected to give a val-
play of the game. The Middies had the At this time Professor Kelsey un- davit was presented to Justice Sid- and Secondary Schools of the South- uable address. Quezon is a powerful
ball on Army's 28-yard line at the dertook to raise in America enough dons by a Burns attorney a few days ern States. :atorad ts wasznis spoerugas
time, but Lloyd's tremendous heave money to carry the work forward, and after the case had ended in a mis- Professor Edmondson is secretary orator, and it was his speaking as
covered almost half the length of the by solicitation of his friends and also trial and formed the . basis of the of the North Central Association of has made him such a great leader in
field, by personal donation he was able to charge by W. J. Burns that the gov- Colleges and Secondary Schools, and:ohasimaeffisuch eathleain
Although it was the means of their send several thousands of dollars to ernment alone, had been guilty of will go to these meetings as official plands.
principal tally, the aerial game of the the association at Munich. jury tampering. representative of the University.
Middies "was seldom a real threat. T V N U S A D NGI A LI T E P
Contrary to expectations, it was the ;STEVENS, OUTSTANDING FIGURE IN ENGINEERING FAIL IN ATTEMPTj
Navy's running game that caused the FIELD, WILL GIVE ADDRESS AT SMOKERTUESDAY TO CROSS OCEAN
Cadets the most trouble, repeatedly -_---
upsetting the vaunted and veteran John F. Stevens who will speak with the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. I nical board supervising the Siberian (By Associated Press)!
West Point forward wall. Paul railroad and the Duluth, South railways. In 1925 he was awarded HORTA, Isle of Fayal, Azores, Nov.
Led by Joe Clifton of Paducah, Ky., here Tuesday night at the Engineering Shore and Atlantic. In 1889 he was the Fritz medal for achievement. 26.-The Junker plane D-1230 made
who was well supported by Ramsford smoker to be held in the Union ball- appointed assistant chief engineer of another unsuccessful attempt to hop
ro mpspfointa d gt e d ssstnt h~i ef offinforofarbor Grcesflaetewftondand
and Lloyd, the Navy's rushing attack room, isone of the outstanding1men the Great Northern railroad and in On the summit of the pass through
continually intimidated the Army in of his field, according to members of 1895 was promoted to chief engineer. which the Great Northern railway at 4 o'clock this afternoon.
the first half, and regained its stride the committee in charge of the affair. He was appointed general manager of, passes a testimonial has been award- The plane made several attempts
once more in the final quarter. Stevens at present is president of the this railroad in 1902. ed to Stevens with the erection of a earlier in the week to continue the
Clifton, darted, bullet-like, through American Society of Civil Engineers, In 1905 he assumed his most notable statute of heroic proportions com- journey with the three members of its
big holes in the Soldier line, but he and has retired from his active en- commission with the undertaking of memorating the finding of the lowest crew and its passenger, Lilli Dillenz,
found this barrier inpenetrable when gineering practice to his home at the burdens of chief engineer for the summit of any of the trans-continental rViennese actress. It started from
his back was to the wall. A 15-yard Southern Pines, South Carolina, where Panama canal. He served in this ca- railroads. Norderney, Germany, over a month
penalty as they held the ball on Ai- he devotes his entire time to his duties pacity for two years, and in 1907 be- Besides Stevens, Dean Mortimer E. ago
my's 5-yard line, broke up the first as president of the civil engineering came chairman of the Isthmian Canal Cooley of the Colleges of Enginering _
my 's 5yaJt line, broke up the first society. commission. In the same year, also, 'and Architecture, who is at present on T
period, it was unable to cross the ± Stevens started his career as en- he was chosen vice-president of the leave of absence, will return to attend
the Cadet's goal line in five thrust's gineer with the city of Minneapolis, New York, New Haven and Hartford the meeting and will speak briefly. A(
Tram the 2-yard mark. * Minn., in 1874. He worked there for railroad in charge of operation. He marimbaphone solo, an orchestra, and .B a Pres_ )

i

BROWNS SUFFER DEFEAT AT HANDS
OF SMITHS IN BATTLE OF NAMES

By J. E. 11.
That old struggle between the
Smiths and the Browns was resumed
this fall when the Smiths overwhelm-
ingly defeated the Browns, 101 to 56,
according to a census recently com-
piled from the 1927-28 Student Direc-
tory.
The feature battle of the book, how-1

and R. G. S.
looked on. One was True, but later he
was caught by a Trapp in spite of the
six Warners. There was one little boy
who was a Washer and then there was
a little girl who was covered with
Lather. Two Misses, one Fast and
the other Faster, played Bridge, the
first had five Diamonds and the second,
six Harts.

i

ever, was between the Millers and the As numerous as ever, the Fords took
Johnsons, which finally ended in a first in the car division with eight
draw, 49-49. Keeping up withthe votes. The others, in order, were
36 Jones was anything but a difficult Jordan, four; Chandler, three; Jewett,
task, a.ccording to the Wilsons, Ander- three; Dodge, two; Durant, two; Hud-
sons and the Davises, who managed to son, two; Olds, two; Nash, two, and
land 35, 34, and 30 representatives Haynes, one.
respectively in the University. There were a complete set of sea-
Those families which were able to sons, though Winter was a top-heavy
maintain 20 or more of their sons and favorite with seven. Four Summers
daughters here were: the Thompsons, testified to the popularity of those
22; Taylors, 22; Campbells, 24; months in proportion to the one Spring
Greens, 20; Robinsons, 20; Wheelers, and Fall. Following typical student
20; Whites, 23; Moores, 24. There' tendencies there appeared six Knights
were 19 Halls, but no Parlors what- to three Days. However the directory
soever. had six Knapps right in the middle of
Though beaten in the all-campus, the book.
event, the 56 Browns retained the Study or not, the present student
championship of their class by plac- body should be well prepared to enter
ing more oL their race than did their any of the trades. In the struggles
nearest rivals, the Greens and the for honors in this field, the Millers had
Whites together. The Whites were it all over the Taylors, 49-22. Also we
crnn1 with 23 while the Greens came have in our midst nine Butlers, six

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