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November 24, 1927 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1927-11-24

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SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THMSDAY, NOVFT-V.MRR--24, 1927

'A

THE MICHiGAN DAILY

TIIURSl)AY, N0VEMB~a~4, W27

BIG

TEN

COA'CHES'

HONOR

I

THREE MICHIGAN PLAYERS

POSITIONS ON FIRST ATEAMLL COUERNC T
AWARDE TO DOSTERBAANJ GILBERT AND BAER

linneisott Via ces Joesting, Alinquist,
And Manson, hile Crofoot Is
Named Quattback
ROUSE CHOSENCENTER

(By Associatedl Piess)
CHICAGO, Nov.: 23.-Capt. Herb
Joesting of Minnesota, and Capt. Ben-
nie Oosterbaan of Michigan, all-Amer-
ican players last year anl likely can-
didates to repeat for that honor this,
season, were again the unanimous
choices of the Big Ten coaches today
for the Western Conference team.
Coach Stagg, Chicago, who does not
favor the picking of "all" teams, cast
no vote, but the other nine coaches
put those two stars on their first team'
without exception.
.Three other Conference luminaries
came within a shade ofunanimous se-
lections. The only votes cast for other
players in 'their positions were due
partly to the desire to balance the
wealth of good line material. These
three who almost made unaimous
votes were Raskowski, Ohio's great
tackle; Baer, Michigau's massive and
powerful guard, and Toad Crofoot,
captain and field general of the Wis-
consin team, at quarterback.
Reitsel Loses To Rouse
Baer lost some votes in the effort of
some of the coaches to settle Captain;
Reitsch, Illinois, and Captain Rouse,
Chicago, on the first team, though
both have played all their games at
center. Only one other center re-
ceived votes besides these two, Ran-
dall of Indiana.
Rouse received more votes for the
first team while Reitsc41 received
more first and second team votes. Only
one coach failed to pick him on one
of the teams.
Hanson, Minnesota, was the out-
standing choice for the other guard.
The other tackle position was a close
race between Nowack Illinois; Gary,
Minnesota; and Nelson, Iowa; with
Nowack having one more first team
vote than the other two who were
tied.
There was likewise a big field of
ends for the flank job opposite Ooster-
baan; Waldo Fisher, Northwestern,
received the most votes, but four oth-
ers were given places by some of the
football directors. Garland Grange,
led Cameron, Wisconsin, by one bal-
lot.
Crofoot Named As Quarter
The backfield positions, except for
first and second team fullback, were
likewise scrambled in the coaches"
effort to honor the array of great ball
carriers in the Conference this year.
Crofoot was the outstanding choice
tor the first team quarterback but
half a dozen, halfbacks were given
scattered votes in order to get them
into the backfield running and block-
ing purposes.
Eby, Ohio, received the most votes
as runnerup to Crofoot. Welch, Pur-
due's brilliant sophomore, was short
of either team by a narrow margin,
his 'single year of competition prob-
ably counting against him.
Tiny Lewis, Northwestern fullback
who suffered from a series of injuries,
was the second preference . of the
coaches, overshadowed by Joesting.
Humbert, Illinois, and George Rich,
Michigan, also received mention.

L.E.-Ooste'rhaan, M icl igin,.
'.T.-"R~owski, nOhio.
L.G.-Hlanson,. linnesofa.
C..'R
C.(--oulse, Chic Vgo.
It, 64 -aer, Ag~vyt,,, 1u,
R.T.-Mocwack, Illimois.
R.E.-Fisher, Northwestern.
Q.B.-Crofoot, Wisconsin.
I E.I.--Ailaert, )i icilgan.
I.13.] AlmIust, linnesota.
I F.B.-Joesting. ..inisota.
SE( ON) 'TEAM.-
L E.-Hiaycraft, Minnesota.
L T.--Nelson, Iowa.
L.G.--Matthews, Indiana.
C. -Reitsch, Illinois.
R.G.-Gibson, Minnesota.
1 R.T.-Gary, Minnesota.
R.E.-Grange, Illinois.
Q.B.-Eby, Ohio.
H.B.-Timm, Illinois.
H.B.-Wilcox, Purdue.
F.B.-Lewis, Northwestern.

KIPKE SPEAKS
BUT. HAS HARD
TIME DOING SO
In (ommenting on his recent ap-
;pintment to the pdsition of head,
football coach at Michigan State
Tuesday, llarry Kipke, former Wol-
vrine all-round star, and a member
tof the present Michigan coaching
"aff, declared that it will be with the
usual "mixed feeling of regret and
satisfaction" that he will assume his
1iew duties at the East Lansing in-
stitlution next fall.
Harry finds it exceedingly difficult
to express his exact sentiments re-
Slarding his appointment, so difficult
in fact, that he prefers to be question-
ed regarding them rather than just
talk.
Naturally enough he regrets to
leave Michigan, the scene of his. in-
Inumerable triumphs as a member of
Wolverine football, basketball and
baseball teams, as well as of hisl
early coaching experiences, but on
the other hand, it is not without jus-
tifiable satisfaction that he takes an-
other step forward in his most prom-
ising career as a coach.
Going to East Lansing and Michi-
gan State college will not be, as
1-Harry expressed it, "like stepping in-
to an entirely new school," for both
are well known to him. Lansing was
his home during the years he earned
a name for -himself in the annals of
high school siorts while playing as
a member of Lansing Central's teams.
Moreover his younger brother "Stub"
starred as a member of Spartan elev-
ens several years ago, and Herb, his
youngest brother, is now enrolled at
State.
In succeeding Coach Ralph Young,
Kipke will take the latest step 'in
his remarkable career as a "coach
which began at Missouri in 1924.
PITTSBURGH TO OPPOSE
STRONG STANFORD TEAM
(Special to The Daily)
PASADENA.-Pittsburgh, one of the
strongest teams in the East this sea-
on, has been selected as Stanford's op-
ponent for the contest to be played at
the annual tournament of the Roses
New Years' Day here.
Pittsburgh is undefeated thus far,
although her record is marred by a
tie contest with Washington and Jef-
ferson, while Stanford has likewise'
been tied by University of Southern
California.

ALONG THI

E SIDELINES

DOPING
THE DOPE
Following are the predictions for
today's football games. Home teamsi
are indicated in black type.
Colgate 13, Brown 0.
Syracuse 13, Columbia 7.1
Pittsburgh 7, Penn State 0.
Bucknell 20, Dickenson 0.
Maryland 13, Johns Hopkins 6.
Pennsylvania 20, Cornell 7.
..V: P. I. 7,T. 11. 1. 6.
George Washington 13, Catholic U.0
W. and J. 13, West Tirginia, 0.
Oklahoma 7, Missouri 13.
Nebraska 13, N. Y. U. 7.
I)etroit 13, S. Dakota State 0.
Oklahoma A. & M. 7, Kansas Ag. 0.
Iowa State 14, Marquette 6.
Washington 20, Oregon 0.
Georgia 13, Alabama 0.
Georgia Tech 13, Alabama Poly 0.
Vanderbilt 20, Sewanee 0.
Tennessee 26, Kentucky 7.
Tulane 6, Louisiana State 6.
H. E. V., P. C. B.

i
1
i
1
c
t

By Iertert F. Vedder
Our eyes are filled with tears and ireshmen andi may be able to keep
the old question, so familiar to co- in the running for a Varsity berth
legiates, "where is the money coming next year on the basis of these. His
from?" has changed to "where is running of the ball has not be,1i-'as
Michigan's 1928 football team coming impressive as it might be, though his
from?" passes contain a little of the bullet-
like accuracy of Benny Friedman.
Facts and figures don't always
mean so much but solve of these The best of the fullbacks is
are worth thinking over. Eight Lytle whose chief (laim to honors
grid men were lost to Michigan a is as a alss catcher rather than
year ago; 17 letter winners will plunger. Thornton, all-state back
leave this fall in addition to two from Senn high of Chicago, is the
other men who won their "1' fastest man in the backfield but.
previously. Friedman, Eow 41a, has not shown too much. Ander-
Molenda and Flora were the son is a fair rmnning back awhile
principle lumninaries lost a year to John iobbin, the lone Iowan
ago; the present loss lists eight of the numeral winners, goes
of the men who started against some credit for his blocking and
Minnesota Saturday including defensive play.
Oosterbaan, Baer, Gabel, Palmer.
ohd, -Nyland, (Albert, hiller, and With Oosterbaan, Nyland, and Hes-
Puckelwartz. ton, all the Wolverine ends, lost by
graduation, flankmen are badly need-
But these aren't al'-Schoenfeld, ed. But where their successors are
Heston, Harrigan, Domhoff, Hoffman. coming from, the yearling mentors
Fuller, Grinnell, Nicholson, and Bab- are unable to even guess. Bailey is
cock 'of the 1927 squad will not re- perhaps th'e best of the yearling ends.
turn. And who are there coming up to ;
take their places? Alvin Cook of Holland is a
promising tackle as is Decker,
This year's freshman squad an all-state man from Flint. Both
produced 23 numeral winners as have a long road to travel before
compared with 34 a year ago. If reaching Varsity positions. The
one Is superstitious to the "nth" squad is fortified with two 200
degree he might like to know that pound centers, in Cooke and /nms
13 of the 23 are from territory but they, too, are far from the
outside' of Michigan. From last heights.
year's' 34 numerals emerged only
one letter this' fall while eight A Saginaw product, Bauer, is con-
were giathering in the A. -1. A. sidered the best of the guards though
awak'ds* that is not much to brag of. Schilla
and Duff are other fair guards.
With capt.-elect Rich, Pommeren-
ing, Bovard, Gembis, Whittle, and Poe WAGNER HUNT LEAD
the only letter winners returning, it
is a serious problem as to whom of INTERCLASS HARRIERS
the yearling will gain places along
with the 1927 reserve material to fill, Unfavorable weather conditions cut
or partially fill, the gaps left by grad- the entries in the all-campus cross
nation. country race down to 20 harriers,
The yearling backfield weans to yesterday. John F. Wagner, 'winner
The yeringbackield seeni toof the interfraternity meet, crossed
have more promise than the line, the finish line first in the last hill and
but that Is not saying too much dale meet of the season. The race was
fort lie backs. hack Wheeler of run over a three mile course in' a
Bayh City is Ahe- best looking of light rain. M. K. Hunt placed second,
the backs, and with 10 or 1) followed by Lowmaster and Whitmer,
p)ounds additional weight should who ran third and fourth, respectively.
develop into a great ball carrier. The first four men placing in this
Wheeler is fast and shifty as well meet are awarded syeaters and' class
as being a hard driver and de- numerals, the harriers placing fifth
pendable pass catcher. and sixth are awarded numerals with
the privilege of buying sweaters.
H'olmes, one of,.the trio of numeral
winners from Canton, Ohio, is the Cloudland, a long shot, won the
best passer and punter among the feature race at Bowie Thursday.
L

HESTONS, YOST
TO PLAY TODAY
Memories of the past will be brought
back this afternoon at Dinan Field,
Detroit when Manlius football teams
tackles the University of Detroit'
freshmen.
Many a Michigan alumni will bes
there including Fielding H. Yost, to
see how much of the "old man" there
is in Fielding Jr. and to find out just
how young "Bill" and "Jack" Heston
compare with their famous father,
"Willie" Heston who was not only'
Michigan's greatest back but one of
the best to ever don football togs.
Young "Bill" Heston, who establish-I
ed a wonderful record in high school
and is following it up with a great
prep school reputation will be wear-
ing number 17. His brother 'Jack'
will be wearing number 19, and Field-
ing will wear number 20. Last week
against the 'Buffalo university fresh-
men these boys showed up very wellI
in Manlius' 96 to 0 victory. Bill
scored five touchdowns, twice running
back punts' for touchdowns; a like
number of times he scored after
catching a pass and once he skirted
end for his final score.
The game will begin at.1 o'clock
and is a preliminary to the University
of Detroit-South Dakota State game.

I-
TURKEY AYPRGRM
LISTS GRID CLSSICS
it trse'ction TI 'Tilts And Sectiolal
Fin;als Feature Tha:mnksgiving
D.y Schedule
GEORGIA PLAYS ALABAMA
Ancient feuds, intersectional con-
tests, and important games in which
undefeated elevens swing into action
again, all these fetaure the Thanks-
giving grid program.
UnIdefeated and untied Georgia op-
poses the Alabama squad which in
former years ruled the South; Okla-
homa meets Missouri in the deciding
ecntest of the Missouri Valley Con-
ference; while Washington and Jef-
ferson plays the ainnual "windup"
with West Virginia.
New York's Violet squad opposes
the Nel)raska team which hMs only the
7-6 defeat at the hands of iMissouri to
blemish the Cornhusker record. M.ar-
quette, victor over Hloly Cross, op-
poses Ames, the only team to mar the
Illinois record.
Pittsburgh plays Penn State in the
24th meeting of the two teams and is
favored to win for the 15th time sin(e
1904,

0

J-

I

TMURSDAN N0V124

West.
U. of Detroit vs. S. D. State, Dinan
field.*
Manlius vs. U. of D. Fr., Dinan field.
Haskell Indians vs. St. Xavier.
Miami vs. Cincinnati.
Wittenberg vs. Dayton.
Denver vs. Colorado.
Kansas Aggies vs. Okla. Aggies.
Iowa State vs. Marquette.
Oklahoma vs. Missouri.
Morningside vs. South Dakota.
New York U. vs. Nebraska.
Utah vs. Utah Aggies.
Washington vs. Oregon.

East.
Colgate vs. Brown.
Dickinson vs. Bucknell.
Catholic U. vs. Geo. Washington.
Syracuse vs. Columbia.
Johns Hopkins vs. Maryland.
Cornell vs. Pennsylvania.
Penn State vs. Pittsburgh.
Thiel vs. Grove City.
W. & J. vs. West Virginia.
South.
Georgia vs. Alabama.
Florida vs. Washington-Lee.
Louisiana State vs. Tulane.
Vanderbilt vs. Sewanee.

r

"The Home of Hart Schaffner and Marx"

I

'Copyright 1627 Hart Schaffner & Mar

AnAltear Tha sivin
FRIDAY and SATURDAY'
We are going to make these two
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We have just received a ship-
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(Extra Trouser, $5.00)
"Do Your Christmas Shopping Early"
, 1W -

194
DISTINCTIVE'( FOOTWEAR
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THANKSGIVING
"Aye Verily"
And some people have much to be thankful for-
Particularly HE who has acquainted himself with that
foremost line of clothing.
HART SCHAFFNER AND MARX

4,

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