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September 23, 1927 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-09-23

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IDAY, SEPTEM3ER 23, 1927.

THE MICHIGA*1*4 DAILY

7 PAGE NINE

- - -----THE- M-ICH.IG.....DA..LY

V~ I'AGE NINFI

FOREIGNERS THREATEN SCOUTS TO VIEW
BRADLEY CONTEST
1k. W MIN'sURtANA, ILISept. 2. -A\hciu
IN M EN'STOURNE dly's aggressive 100tb)ll T
Lithe Nintee champions and victors
Glenna Collett Eliminated by Former Little .iNneteen champions and victors
Alex Stiring; 1I"etwih in the last 24 tiams they have played,
ChamioWins1plays the University of Illinois here
rl rfln1' I C'TA nI1 on Octover 1, a large chunk of Illi-

Many Ball Records CHICK EVANS RISES TO NEW GLORY; 'Pave Pleased WithFIOMI ADVANCE T
B - I&FINANCIAL DIFFICULTIES SE T TLEDi dPop LLI~ LHIIfL
et By Bkiller Nine Ind s rospc0
S(l AssciatedlPress}) CI ICAG .-The ri"e and fall f " and other personal won ic In 19E(Specia to 'Pie 1):iNA.L

viiiNiNn, viiii17, z)(,pc. zz.-r ar irom

f imous olfei s is common, but the 1

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UC I KVI I b I AK i.,UZCZ

(By Associated Press)
GARDEN CITY, N. Y., Sept. 22.-
Mrs. Alexa Stirling Fraser, the adop-
ted Canadian stroking in champion-
ship form, accounted for the biggest
upset of the American women's ama-
teur golf c/assic in progress on the
Cherry Valley links. The former
Southern- girl eliminated the favor-
ite, Miss Glenna Collett of Prov:-
dence, R. I., considered America's
chief defense against the foreign in-
vasion. She won, 2 up and 1 to play.
Today Mrs. Fraser will meet Mle.
Simmone Tl/on de La Chaume, petite
champion of France and England in
the feature event of the third round
matches. The French "Mamzelle" had
her troubles in her second round
match yesterday with Mrs. G. H. Hig-
mie of Detroit but managed to coast
to victory on her early lead, squeez-
ing into the third round, 1l up.
Two Matches Featured.
The second feature match today
will' bring Miss Ada Mackenzie, Can-
adian champion and medalist of this
tournament, against Miss Virginia Van
Wie of Chicago. The Chicago girlaias
been stroking in beautiful form and
will give Miss Mackenzie her first
taste of serious competition. Mrs.
Harry Pressier, San Gabriel, Calif.,
the Western champion, and Mrs. Mir-
iam Burn Horns of Kansas City will'
meet in another important match and
Miss Maureen Orcutt, the Metropoli-
tan champion, will try strokes with'
(Continued in Column 7.)

nois boydom will be tensely interested.
For it will be scout day in the
stadium and 4,000 youngsters who
owe allegiance to the scout movement
will be guests of the university. All
around the state civic clubs are
busy making plans to transport their
troops. In most cases they will-come
by motor cars but some special trains
have been arranged.
Bradley opens its season against
Macomb Normal Saturday and if vic-
torious will have increased its string
of consecutive victories to 25, an ex-
ceptional record. lIiiimi scouts will
observe the Peorians in action to
make sure that there will be no am-
bush when Coach Robertson's players
invade the stadium.
Zuppke Needs Backs
(Continued from Page 8.)
Nowack and Perkins are the veteran
timber for tackle.
Art D'Ambroiso and Edgar Nickol,
both Chicago boys, and Frosty Peters
will take care of the ends, with the
possibility that Garland Grange,
"Red's" younger brother, may. be
shifted to the 'wings. An injured
shoulder kept him on the sidelines
most of last fall, his first year out.
The Illini open their schedule with
Bradley Polytechnic, champions for
two years of the 'Little 19" (Illinois
conference), and holders of a record
of 24 straight victories in the past
three years.

being assured of even a first. division renaissance of a golfing star who has
berth in the American Association's aprnl
final standing, Minneapolis is tearing apParently passed the zenith of his
down the home stretch carrying more career is so rare that much attention
records for the season than perhaps was given the rejuvenated Chick
all the other clubs combined. Evans at the National Amateur chain-
Pat Malone, Miller pitcher, twice pionship at Minneapolis. In fact, he
has equalled the world's record of six was more loudly acclaimed during the
strike-outs in a row, held by Marty final rounds at Minikahda than was
O'Toole. the spectacular victor, Bobby Jones,
Eddie Kenna, his batterymate, who smothered all opponents in the
knocked out two home runs in one last three rounds with unbeatable golf.
inning to set a new all-time Associa- Evans for several years was the idol
tion mark. Kenna, a few days prior of golfdom, both at home and abroad,
to that performance, hit three sue- that Jones is today. Although he never
eessive home runs, tying the record won any title abroad, except the
held by Babe Ruth and Ernie Krue- French amateur, he was lauded to the
ger. A few days later "Tarzan" Tuck- skies by English golfers in the full
er, 1926 sensation of the Southern As- days of his career. He mounted all the
sociation, equalled Kenna's feat. golfing thrones in America, come of
Fielding honors of the record-break- them repeatedly, and still has to his
ing Millers go to Sammy Bohne, third credit three records that no other
baseman, and Frank Emmer, short- amateur has taken.
stop. In 1916 at Minikahda he set a record
Bohne established a new league rec- score of 286 for the national open and
ord for third basemen by playing 35 in that year won both the open and the
perfect games afield, bettering the amateur crowns, a feat unequalled. In
previous record of 32. addition to those exclusive posses-
Emmer early in the season played sions, he is the only amateur who ever
22 errorless games at short, tying the won the Western Open, an event
record held by Jim Cooney, now of largely duplicating the national open
the majors. Emmer has led the as to competitors.
league in home runs for most of the Then the smiling Chick slumped co-
season. Incidentally with financial troubles

1
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he tied with Bobby Jones for lo\ BLOOAIlNGT(N In . e
medal in the (lualifying rounds of the (oach I'at I'e p I enough
national amateur at Flossmoor, with todyl to tell correspondents that lie Aiss D
149, but lost in the playoff and was is more satisfied wit- 1 lndiana I 'ni- 1iver (
defeated in the first match around hy versity football mat erial this yearj !its.
Willie Hunter. Afterwards he asserted than that which reported to hint last chanpi
that whenever he was about to make a season. TheI loosier ient or has his, Als. (o
shot he would see with dismay some gridders in bette comdition a his 110r no
person in the gallery who was his time than at the end of the firc two by a c
creditor. Having lost a fortune he had weeks in 1926. l home,m
accumulated, Chick could not keep upl Pat has good roli to be more employ
the shots which had been pronounced satisfied. his men all cam e back one utij.
by such men as Harry Vardon and good physical shape. Most of them caSter

omtiuved fmz'oin Column 2.)
aric .Jenluy of the Hudson
Wf Club.
Hlarry Firesselr, the western
on, had her hands full with
)rtland Smith of New Jersey.
n- to, amnple lead cut down
omplc ,f stymies on the way
1rs. rress'er was forced to
all of her golf cunning to win
Maaureei Orcutt, the youthful
plaver 'who is being backed
in these parts to take the title
I Rasalie -napp of Long Is-
up and 4.
KA E

>
,
l

Jerome Travers as the best in theN
world.S
Next year, in the amateur, he fadedN
out after the first round. Ile wasi
dropped from the Walker Cup team
and was stricken off the official list
of leading golfers. In 1925 he failed
to qualify.s
He won his eighth western amateurt
title in 1923 by defeating Jess Sweet-
ser in a thrilling 38-hole semi-final
match, but in 1924 he was defeated by
.Jimnmie Manion of St. Louis andl was
any easy first round victim the next
year at Detroit. In 1926 he fell prey to
a boy, Art Tveraa, of Minneapolis. t
The former premier of golf, who had<
won the national amateur twice and
held ti more years than any other man

went after manual labor jobs during
vacation, and as a result retnuned here
well hardened for the toughest sched-
ule Indiana has recently laced. They
a ppear to be full of loot bll spirit and
ambition.
lie put serinunage on the first (lay's
menu, and it has remained an every
day job. The varsity men are standing
up under the gruelling grind with only
a few minor injuries report ed. Only a,
few candidates have dropped out be-
cautse of the hot pace set by Pat Page.
Signals and plays which Page
worked out during the summer have
come in for some long lectures by the
chieftain. The gridders have been
called into Memorial Stadium twice
for private instructions. 1Nobody but
the players and coaches airc permitted
within sight of the field.

heavily
tic ' itter
land, 5

BIG BOY
- in -
"HITCHING UP"
Also
A W(-stern
Plenty of Parking Spl ce
on Ashley Street

except Travers,
golfdom said.

was down and

..A mus %0 I

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h -5

Suits hand tailored

at 23

points

xB_~
. AD~4

18E
A
WIL

Imported Cloths

/

3M. CA SSIF IE
CLOSES eCLOSE
AT 3 PM ADVERTISING AT 3 P,

,

An overcoat in Oxford
Grey of the finest
fabric made in the

i

Merrie country.

Tail-

II

a

HOTEL SAGE, Detroit, Mich.
1537 Center St. Around the corner
troit, Mich. Around the corner
from Capital Theater. Downtown
shopping district. Quiet place for
refined people. All outside rooms.
Single, $1.50; double, $2 Private
bath: S'ingle, $1.50 and $2; double,
$2.50.

NOTICES
NOTICE-Emma Fischer Cross, teach-
er of piano and pipe-organ, former-
ly on the faculty of Schol4 of Music.
Extensive study abroad. 610 E.
Liberty. Apt. 8. Phone 3566.
1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10
FOR RENT
FOR, RENT--324 E. Jefferson, unfur-
nished apt. 4 large rooms, private
bath, all newly decorated. Heat
and water $65. 1-2-3-4-5-6
FOR RENT-Front suite, very desir-
able. 715 E. Huron. Phone 8528.
3-4.
FOR RENT-Large single room, 3
blocks from Eng. Bldg. Call 21217.
2-3-4
FOR RENT-One large room single
or double-low rate. Men. Dial
7391--1026 Packard. 3-4
FOR RENT-A large double room.
1208 S. University. Dial 6637.
2-3-4
FOR RENT-Single room two blocks
from campus in southeastern section
for graduate woman. Phone 8006.
2-3-4
FOR RENT-Large suite fo rtwo or
three students. One single room.
Junior Engineer wants roommate.
Garage for rent. 425 South Division.
2-3-4
FOR RENT-Single room close to
campus. Bath adjacent. Shower
bath. Phone 8394 4
FOR RENT-A suite on second fioor
in a desirable location, 429 S. Di-
vision. 4,-5-6
FOR RENT-A large double, -O- for
two students in quiet home. 203 N.
State. 4-5-6
FOR RENT - Furnished six-room
house, Al condition, facing campus.
Adults only. Phone 5561. 4
WANTED-To sub-let suitable room
for week-ends during next so nester.
Dial 8317. 0.11 Stinson.
3-4-5

FOR SALE-For sweets call B. E.
Wagner. Phone 22413 or 9534.
2-3-4-6-7-8
FOR SALE-2 study tables in good
shape. Call 5424 evenings; ask for
Fred.
ILO0ST
LOST-Lady's white gold watch, on
campus Tuesday. Initials G. R. C.
on back. Please call Coleman 21717.
3-4
NOTICE
440 THOMPSON
CAREFUILLY planned meals, plenty of
salads and vegetables, home-made
pies, generous re-order privileges.
Lunch, 40c; dinner, 60c; Sunday,
75c; breakfast a la carte. $6.00 a
week; good until used. Phone 6928.
2-3-4
.MISCELLANEOUS
A SPECIALIST in children's care will
care for children in the home be-
tween 2 and 6 p. m. Call 6559 after
1:30 p. m. 3-4-5
SENIOR-Lit wants room-mate for
an excellent suite at 1210 Wash-
tenaw. Call 9175. 3-4-5
CHOICE-White Clover honey, the
best we harvested in years. $1.50 in
ten pound cans. Dial P. Wuerfel
6187. 3-4.

ored by Goodinan-Suss,
THOMPSON'S
SOUTH U

ti4p
1 -

r

4Swit's
--Drug Store--
340 S. STATE ST,. r!

for

'4'

Y:
d

If it is something

ROOM;S-For light housekeeping for
two, $35 a month-$17.50 apiece.
Telephone 5571. 3-4
WILL-Person who borrowed Conklin
pen in Room 25 Angell Hall Friday
please return it to 521 East Jeffer-
son or call 3141.
RELIABLE cook and porter desire
position in fraternity or home.
Phone 4928. 4
A SENIOR lit wants a room mate for
a good suite at 1210 Washtenaw.
Call 9175. 4, 5, 6)
SENIOR H. S. student wants odd jobs
afternpons aind Saturday. Call
Huston. 6759. 4
WANTED
WANTED--Girl to work for room or
room and board. Exceptional room
mnlpivileges. Three in family.
Dial 21825. 4, 5, 6
WANTED-Students to sell at all the
football games. We need six more
to complete our organization.
This is a good way to see the out
of town games. 4F'or particulars
see F. 11. Fradenburgh, 116 N. State,
Spaulding Apts., or call 6455. Home
anytime after 6:30 P. M. 4, 5, 6

Fountain Pens- r
Schaeffer
Moore
Conklin
All Makes of Pencils
Alarm Clocks
Laundry Bags
Stationery

a Man wears,
have it.
Custom made clothing
Read-to-wear

we

Towels

};,
.

Tuxeoes and

Safety Razors
Shaving Creams
Tooth Brushes
Dental Creams
All Styles of Pipes
Pipe'Tobacco
Ash Trays

opcots
Men's furnishings
Hats, Shoes

11

Medic Coats

WANTED-To buy a few ladies and
children's second handed bicycles.
Call 9142. 3-4-5-6.
WA N T E D-Experienced laundress
wants family and student washings
to do at home. Called for and de-
livered. Phone 3122. 3-4.
WANTED-Roommate, must be white
and Gentile. Call Fred at 5424, eve-
nings. Fraternity man preferred.

WANTED--Student musicians, be$
longing to American Federation of
Musicians, for dance orchestra.
Piano, Alto Sax, Trumpet, Banjo,
Drums. Dance work ef perience re-
quired. Joseph Solomon. 432
Thompson. Phone 3418.
WANTED-Young women wish to
share apartment with one or two
college or business women. 345 S.,
Division St. 4-5-6

i
I
i

I

Laboratory supplies

Cigars

Q

Cigarettes
C"

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4dikk

e

,_r1---------------------------------.,,

11

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