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November 12, 1927 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-11-12

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SATURDAY, NOVEMBElt 12, 1927

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGIE TR EE

............... . . .. . ....

HOBBS RELATES PROGRESS
OF_'GREENLANDEXPEDITION
(Continued from Page One) mit was found a lake of delicious
water. Work was begun at once on
with a wind velocity of 81 miles an moving the necessary materials to

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danger to the shack is fire, on ac- location in order to measure the
ceunt of the quantities of gasoline movement of the glacieis which form
and kerosene that must be used. In the ice-cap. Five poles were set up,
case it should be rendered untenable but a snow storm interrupted op-
by fire, Oscanyan and Kallquist have erations and only three of these
an auxiliary shack to which they can could be located. The ice was melting
retire for the winter. at the time, and it is not certain that

HERE TO STUDY
"BIG BILL" ACTS

Deain Of Forestry Questions Statement
Thart Timber Shortage Is Not Possible

hour as measured by the expedition's
anemometer, hit the Greenland camp,
and 48 hours later New York suffered
the summer's most severe storm
which flooded basements and so dark-
ened the skies that ships had to navi-
gate by ,beacons at midday. A con-
nection between the two storms
seems likely, but no such thing as
a regular predition can be looked
forward to until the problem has been
carefully. investigated and tested.
Professor Hobbs sailed on May 10
from New York, joining at Copenha-
gen the -rest of his party which in-
cluded Ralph L. Belknap of the geol-
ogy faculty, second in command;
Prof. Jaes E. Church, a meteorolo-
gist fro$1 the University of Nevada;
Clarene: R, Kallquist, aerologist on
leave fromm the United States Weather
Bureau; Paul Oscanyan, radio ex-
pert; and Fred Herz, photographer,
Carl O. Irlason of the botany facul-
ty accomppanie them as botanist, but
was not a igular member of the
expeditio.
The pa ,s to sail on the new
Danish o ent ship Disko, but
was deayegr t Copenhagen two
weeks white le Disko was g:ven a
trial ru guc under way, however,
a good run was made to Holstenborg,
which was reached on June 21. The
supplies of the expedition were at
once transferred to the 22-ton motor
schooner Walrus, powered by a kero-
sene engine of low power, aboard
which the party began the last leg
of their journey to the end of Soendre
Stroemfjord, or Kangendlugssda
Fjord, as it is known to the Green-l
landers.
Camp Little First Stop
The first port of call for the Walrust
was Camp Little, a supply base es-e
tablished last year by a preliminary
expedition led by Hobbs. Camp Little
was demolished, and everything load-1
ed onto the Walrus, which set sail
southward again, but ran almost at
once into the teeth of an Arctic gale
that rendered progress impossible.2
The Walrus put into an inlet for shel-
ter and was forced to remain there
a week until the storm, which na-
tives called the longest and earliest
in 18 years, had blown over. When
the storm had somewhat abated at
the end of three days, Hobbs and his
men ventured out of the inlet, towing
a lighter and dory, but both the
lighter and dory broke loose and weret
recovered only with difficulty after1
the Walrus had been turned back into1
shelter.
Fine weather, however, followed
the gale, and the party lost no time
in reaching Soendre Stroemfjord, one
of the longest on the Greenland coast,
which runs 120 miles inland. With
clar skies and amid beautiful scen-
ery they sailed up the entire length
of this fjord in a dingle day. As they
neared the head of the fjord a lookout
was kept for streams of fresh water by
which to pitchbcamp, and for flat
stretches suitable for landing. By a
stroke of fortune the two were found
together; the ship was unloaded anI
Camp Lloyd set up, in memory of the
late Dean Alfred H. Lloyd of the
graduate school.
Living Conditions Poor
Living Jonditions aboard the Wal-
rius on the journey from Holstenborg
to Camp Lloyd left much to be de-
sired in the way; of comfort. The tiny
vessel carried a crew of four na-
tive Greenlanders, members of Hobbs'
party, and the white members of the
party. Living accommodations were
exceedingly limited, compelling Belk-
nap to sleep in the miniature wheel-
house, and Hobbs and Herz to make
their beds under an old sail atnp one
of the hatches. The food provided by
the Greenlanders was stored in the
hold and inaccessible, with the result
that food ran low during the trip.
As soon as Camp Lloyd has been
established early in July, scouting
parties were sent out to phk a suita-
ble mountain for the permanent wea-
ther station. Another brilliant piece
of luck was encountered in Mount
Evans, named after Edward S. Evans

of Detroit, 50 feet below whose sum-

the summit of Mount Evamn. The ia-
bor involved was tremendous, for ev-
erything had to be carried on sledges
pulled by the members of the party
more than two miles, 1300 feet up,
along ledges and over trailless

Erect Weather Station these poles will still be where placed!
The chief work of this summer's when the party returns in 1928. j
aexpedition was to erect this weather Pary Mlembers To Continue
Sstation on top of Mount Evans. Ever
since July 23, however, full data has Bangsted and Professor Church.
been collected, and a large amount who are at present with OseranyanI
of balloon work has been done. In and Kallquist on Mt. Evans, will
the latter, the party was favored by leave Dec. 1 if possible for a three
, perpetual clear skies. By a fortunate months' stay on the ice about 100
geographical chance, the inland ice miles farther inland. Hobbs has made
sends an arm down the southern edge a contract with Bangsted to go as
of the Soendra Stroemfjord which far as he can and remain as long asI
condensed all moisture carried by the ! he can. He and Church will dig a
prevailing southeast winds. As a re- cave in the snow and establish a
suit clear skies favored the balloon meteorologicqal station. Bangsted, who
work every day. has had experience in remaining on
For 21 days Hobbs, Belknap, and the ice during the winter, volunteered
several other members of the party to take charge of this difficult part
were absent from the main camp on of the work, and Prof. Church vol-
an expedition over the inland ice. urnteered to accompany him. The
Supplies had to be carried with great station which they will set up about
difficulty 25 miles to the ice-edge, and 200 miles inland will be the third in
the ice-surface was so rough that operation this winter, for data will
progress was painfully slow and de- be collected at Mt. Evans, and at Hol-
liberate. In spite of the crampons, or stenborg by a Danish official whom
spikes, worn by the party, it was diffi- Hobbs pays $100 a year to read in-I
cult to maintain a foothold on the struments there.
ice. It was possible to remain on the Hobbs and Belknap left Camp Lloyd
ioe only a week, because of the de- on Sept. 12, reaching Copenhagen on
lays encountered in leaving Copenha- Oct. 10. Hobbs delivered lectures in
gen and in reaching Camp Lloyd from Guteborg, Hamburg, Combridge, Lon-
Holstenborg. It was the aim of the don, and Glasgow before sailing from
party to set up poles and fix their Southampton on Nov. 1.

Questioning wilely published state-
Lnt s bly th Nat joail Lumber Manu-
Set _er's _sociition implying Ihat!
Iere is no dnr of a timber short-
age and that eu -1ov< forests as ai
whole ar 7 1 . n ning to grow timber,
(ol. W. I. Gretley, cli1f of the Forest
Service of11- Lit ed Stales, has ad-
dressed 1an 0 )n le ite to h lassocia-
ionclln Otea ont the (danger of,
1r01 in mgpalir misconceplt ion as to
lie gra vii y of 1h forest situation.
Te Fo r~st ec e prot est grew out
of ad risem:ents ii' natinal journals
in f:: rthei amter ot a nation-wie lm-
her trade exei on ampaign

When 1tesIioned about the prot.est,
Dean Samuel T. 1)ana of the School
of Forestry and conservation agreel
fully with Col. ( reeley in that there is
I (langer of the l)resent timber supply
being exhausted. 'f'he advertisement,
which has been issuel in the form of
l)amlphlets, is entirely wrong in its
statelnent that there is 110 timber short-
age, Dean Dana said]. "The idea of
the lumber manufactur'ers to po -
larize the use ot wood is a good one,"
he said, "but the manufacturers have
no license to say that all the timber
possilble should be used. There tnust
be conservation or eventually there
will be no forests at all."

Henry yekham Steed.
British journalist, who is now in
the United States, plans to study
Mayor Thompson's anti-British cam-
paigning which is now drawing so
much attention to Chicago.
NEW YORK.-Graduate courses in
art, music, and drama have been add-
ed to the curriculum of the floating
University which leaves New York.
Oct. 6, 1928.

Prof. William H. Hobbs
ground. Materials for building the
station, three 250-lb. batteries, and a
Del4o gasoline-driven motor-genera-
tor weighing 300 lbs, had to be trans-
ported in this matter.
Constructed Own Buildings
Moving the materials and 6recting
the weather station required consid-
erable time, but by July 20 the shack
was half erected and the job of mov-
ing in was begun. In constructing
the shack 2x4 studding was used,
covered with boards, and the whole
overlaid with a heavy covering of can-
vas. Architecturally the shack is not
a masterpiece for it was primarily
designed with a view to protecting it
from wind damage. The party did
their work so well that the 81 mile
gale of July 21 was not even noticed
within the half-completed shack.
The shack contains a complete wea-
ter station capable of recording all
of the data.whichis recorded at the
regulation U. S. Weather Bureau sta-
tions, and complete wireless trans-
mitting and receiving set, in addition
to living quarters for Oscanyan and
Kallquist who will remain there
throughout the winter. The greatest

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L EA RB UR Y

Two Pant Suits
$40 -$45
at
DERRILL

Overcoats

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$37.50 to $45

P R AT T ' S

322 South State

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....... ......-- -......

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Detroit Theaters
n vu....." .. u.u...... ............
CASS THEATRE
Third and Last Week l
Starting Sunday, November 6
GENE BUCK'S
Newest, Fastest, Funniest Show
"TAKE THE AIR" =
Prices: Evenings, $1 to $3.50 .
Popular Wed. and Sat. Matinees ..~

Z-
ookin by Cloc
In the Arabian tale, a nicely
prepared meal promptly
made its appearance out of
the air when Aladdin rubbed
his Wonderful Lamp.
Nowadays, .in Electric Range
cooking, the magic lamp is re-
placed with a clock, which auto-
matically attends to the cooking.
All you have to do is to put the
food in the range, set the clock
-and forget the kitchen till
dinner-time.
Electric Range cooking is done
without hovering over a hot fire,
without watching, without
trouble or anxiety, without
smoke or dust or fumes
- and with perfect
cleanliness.

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FIRST METHODIST
Corer CHURCH
Corner State and Washington Sts.
Arthur W. Staler, D.1)., Minister
Parley C. Bingluan, Assistant
Minister and Student Director
10:30--"The Mind and Religion."
12:00-Student Bible Class led by
Ralph Johnson.
6:00-Lawrence H. Conrad oT the
Rhetoric Dept., will speak on
"Truth and Poetry."
7:00-County Brotherhood Meet-
ing. Dr. M. S. Pittman will
speak.
THE UNITARIAN CHURCH
State and Huron Streets
Sidney S. Robins, Minister
November 13, 1927
10:45 a. m.-Morning Service. "The
Crying- Need of Monasteries."
5:45 p. m.-Candlelight Supper.
6:45 p. m.-Professor John H.
Muyskens, "Modern Realism"

SUNDAY CHURCI- , SERVICES

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
It. 3lWard Sayles, Minister
RiV. Howard Chapman,
Minister for Students.
10:45-Mr. Sayles will preach. Sub-
ject, "Autonomous Conscience.
(4th sermon in special series)
12:00-Church Bible School.
12:00-Student's Guild Bible Class.
Concluding study on, racial re-
lations and Jesus' Teaching.
5:30-The friendship hour at
Guild House.
6: 30-SPECIAL: Students will
meet in Church Parlors. Mem-
bers of Church will present
the challenge of the Church to
youth.
FIRST CHURCH OF
ChRIST, SCIENTIST
409 South Diision Street
10:30 a.m.-Regular Morning Serv-
ice; Subject, Mortals and Ini-
mortals.
11:45 a.m.-Sunday School follow-
ing the morning service.
7:45 p.m.-Wednesday evening tes-
timonial meeting.
The Reading Room, 10 and 11
State Saving Bank Building is open
daily from 12 to 5 o'clock, except
Sundays and legal Holidays.
ZION LUThERAN CHURCH
Washington St. and Fifth Ave.
9:00 a. m.-Bible Study.
10:30 a. m.-Reformation Services.

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Corner Huron and Division
Merle If. Anderson, Minister
Dale It. Moore, Associate.
Mrs. Nellie B. Cadwell
Secretary vfor Women.
9:30-Church School. Student
Class led by Prof. Running.
10:45-Morning Worship. Sermon
on "The Personal Eqtuation in
Rethgon."
12:00- Student Class led by Prof.
IHloward McClusky.
5:30-Social Ilour and Supper.
6:30-Young People's Society.
Prof. Howard McClusky, Leader.
BETHLEHEM
EVANGELICAL CHURCH
(El angehal Synod of N. A.)
Fourth Ave., between Packard
and WIlliams
G. A. Neumann, Minister
9:00 a. m.-Sunday School.
10:00 a. n.-Morning Worship.
Sermon tonic: "The Virtne of
Gratitude."~
11:00 a. m.-German Service.
6:30 p, mn.-Young People's Hour.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
DISCIPLES
Corner 1ll and Tappan
Rev. Frederick Cowin

CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH
Dr. Carl S. Patton, Minister.
9:30-Sunday School.
10:45-Morning Worship.
Dr. Fred Eastman
"One Source of Courage."
5:30-Student Fellowship Supper.
Prof. Thomas Reed, Speaker.
ST.ANDREW'S
(EPISCOPAL) CHURCH
])ivision and Catherine Streets
Rev. Henry Lewis, Rector
Thomas L. Harris, Assistant
Twenty-Second Sunday After
Trinity. November 13, 1927
8:00 a. m.-Holy Communion
(the Church).
9:30 a. m.-Holy Communion
(Harris Hall).
11:00 a. m.-Morning Prayer and
Sermon by the Rt. Rev. John
N. McCormick, D. D., Bishop
of Western Michigan.
6:15 p. m.-Student Supper. Dis-
cussion.

._._.._

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Woodward, at Eliot
BON STELLE
PLAYHOUSE
Second and Last WEEKi
Beginning Mon., Nov. 7
NIGHTS: 75c, $z$o. Mats. Tues.,
Thur. and Sat., 50c, 75c
Myron C. Fagan's Greatest Comedy
Ti eittle Snitfire

HILLEL FOUNDATION
615 E. University Dial 3

779'

ST. PAUL'S LUTHERAN
CHIURGc
(Missouri Synod)
Third and West Huron Streets
C. A. Brauner, Pastor
Parsonage: 420 West Liberty.

r '1.

Sunday, Nov. 12,. 1927

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