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November 10, 1927 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-11-10

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10 lIT

THE MICHIGAN DfATLY

v a ll>A L!"l1L L a .a . aa ..

" - . L , 11 - I ! I- I I I I I . , -, - .

DAILY O FFI CIAL BULLETIN,
Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members of
the University. Copy received by the Assistant to the President until
3:30 p. m. (11:30 a. m. Saturday.)

SCHUMANN.HEINK RECALLS DEBUT
OF STAR ANNOUNCER AS SINGER

Urge Less Complex Governpr Calls OutVI CIOL DEBAJ[
Language In Russia Help For Sufferers
(n Associaed Press_________________ ,\)l iII I I I ~ i i i
Despite simplfication of the Reis- -.,'
,ian alphabet in 1917 by the cancel-

Volume 8.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10,

Number 44.

Apparatus Exchange:
The Regents alt their meeting in March, 1927 authorized an arrangement
for the sale of scientific apparatus by one department to another, the proceeds
of the sale to be credited to the budget account of the department from which
the apparatus is transferred.
Departments having apparatus which is not in active use are advised to
communicate with the University Chemistry Store, of which Professor R. J.1
Carney is Director, in regard to the disposal of this material. The Chemistry
Store headquarters are in room 223, Chemistry building. An effort will be
made to sell the apparatus to other departments which are likely to be able to
use it. In some instances the apparatus may be sent to the University Chem-
istry Store on consignment, and, if it is not sold within a reasonable time, it
will be returned to the department from which it was received.
The object of this arrangement is to promote economy by reducing the
amount of unused apparatus. It is hoped that departments having such appar-
atus yill realize the advantage to themselves and to the University in avail-
ing themselves of this opportunity.
Shirley W. Smith.
Senate Council:
The regular meeting of the Senate Council will be held in the President's
office at 4:15 p.m. on Monday, November 14.
F. E. Robbins. I
University Lectures :
Dr. Dixon Ryan Fox, Professor of American History in Columbia Univer-
sity, will deliver two University lectures in the Natural Science auditorium
as ollows :
Wednesday, November 16, at 4:15 p.m., "Refuse Ideas and their Disposal."
Thursday, November 17, at 4:15 p.m., "Culture in Knapsacks; the thoughts
of European Soldiers in America, 1776-1783."
The public is cordially invited.
F. E. Robbins.
Attention of Faculty Members:
The DICTAPHONE STATION has been moved to the basement of Angell
Hall, room 208, immediately adjacent to the elevator shaft.
E. Whitchurch.
Retailing B.A. 255:
The class will not meet with Business Policy today (Thursday) at 11
o'clock but will do so on Saturday at 11 o'clock.
C. N. Schna.
Political Science 291; Journal Club:
There will be a meeting of the Journal Club today at 3, 2035 Angell hall.
J. S. Reeves.
Business Administration Club:
There will be a meeting of the Business Administration Club at 1:30
Thursday evening, November 10, in room 302, Michigan Union.
J. H. Husselnan, Secretary.
varsity Debate Squad:1
All the men on the Varsity debate squad meet in the Adelphi room on
the fourth floor of Angell hall, Friday afternoon, at 5 o'clock.
J. 1W. O'Neill.
Choral Union Ushers:
Members of the Choral Union ushering force are requested to be in their
places at Hill auditorium not later than 7:30 o'clock tonight, as the doors
will be opened at that hour.
W. A. Davenport.
Negro-Caucasian Club:
There will be a meeting of the Negro-Caucasian Club Friday night, Novem-
her 11, at 8 o'clock, at Lane hall. Interested persons are cordially invited.
L. B. Smith, Vice-President.
P1 Lambda Theta:
The regular business meeting will be held on Thursday, November 10 at
the home of Mrs. Morin, 1112 Lincoln avenue, at 7:30 p.m. Take a Burn's
Park bus.
Jean X. de Vries, President.
Adviser's Tea:
All University women are cordially invited to tea at Barbour gymnasium
from 4:15 to 5:30 today. Girls from Austin League House and Feiner League
House are assistant hostesses.
Alice C. Lloyd.
Tolstoy League:
Rev. Frank Hartley, British World War veteran will lecture Thursday,
November 10 at 4:15 in room 231 Angell hall on "The Nailed Hand or the
Mailed Fist?" The public is invited.!
A. A. Birnkrant.1

1ation of numerous cumbersome Siav
letters, the new Russian style of
i\ting has become so complicated
jand so incomprehensible that there
,s much agitation for further reform.
Particilarly in the press and in
government publications has the lan-
guage become unintelligible to the,
average Russian, because of an abun-
dance of elaborate sentences and the
frequent use of words of foreign deri-
vation, notably in economic and tech-
nical articiles.
Few average soviet readers can
understand such writing, to say noth-
ing of the bulk of peasants and work-
men who have hardly been aroused
as yet from centuries of utter illiter-
acy.
The invasion of foreign words is
attributed in large part to the gath-
ering of communists, who spent years
in exile or who were strangers to
the Russia of the czars and who, com-
ing to the soviet states, brought with
them many foreign terms. The in-
fluence of America is largely felt in
such words as standards, limit pric-
es, fordization, conveyers and stabili-
zation.
The complicated language of gov-
ernment decrees is even worse. In
the code of labor, starting point of,
rz1Uf t3, 1EU!3t~fltn~
PARTY PROGRAMS
ANNOUNCEMENTS
INVITATIONS
STATIONERY
FOLDERS
NEWSLETTERS
PLACARDS
BUSINESS CARDS
CALLING CARDS
ETC., ETC.
1 fAfIryi P~ rint 'l11up
215 S. Main St. (off Liberty)
Phone 3231
G ~.9 For Service and Quality, None Better

Atjcording to an

announcement

4

from the Extension department, the
schedule of the first debate in the
preliminary series of the Michigan
High School Debating league has
been completed and mailed to the
competing, schools. The first round of
contests will be held Friday, Nov. 18.
Ann Arbor, who won the state
championship debate last May in Hill
auditorium, is matched with Royal
Oak. With all the members of last
year's team lost by 'graduation, it -
considered unlikely than Ann Arbor
will repeat, an accomplishment of
which no high school in the league
can boast. Albion, the school defeated
by Ann Arbor in the finals, meets
Grand Rapids Ottawa Hills, in its
first encounter.
The league enrollment now num-
bers 235 high schools which is the
largest enrollment in the history of
the Mi igan High School Debating
league. In addition to the 200 schools
whose schedule is prepared by the
Extension department, there are 25
Upper Peninsula schools and 10 De-
troit schools in the-League who are
debating under separate schedules.
NEW YORK.--The average yearly
salary of residents on Park Avenue is
$75,000.

- -- *~~~.. . v .r N .~ --

x

Gov. oin E. Weeks
Of Vermont, who has put the state
machinery to work in giving aid to
the many sufferers of disastrous
floods in Vermont.
communism, there are 192 para-
graphs, which cover four large vol-
umes. Even judges and lawyers are
puzzled by some of the passages.

.]

Graham McNamee.
Famous radio announcer, who is also a singer. Madam Ernestine Schu-
mann-Heink, opera and concert singer, at a "reunion" with McNamee in Cleve-
land, recalled that his first appearance was with her as an assisting artist in
New York 16 years ago, when he was 22.
Cause Of Resignation From Staff Given
By Former Wisconsin Football Mentor
In a recent interview George Lit- en," complained that although Little
tle, the Wisconsin athletics director, was turning out finely coached foot-
explains his reasons for resigning the ball teams Intramural athletics were
actual coaching of the Cardinal elev- fading in lack of support and guid-
en, to Glen Thistlewaite. Little at- ance. The second which appeared just
tributes his changed policy to the in after the defeat by Wisconsin evinced
fluence of two editorials which ap- te d
peared in the Wisconsin Daily Card- the loyal and generous support which
inal. the entire student body gave to her
The first entitled "A Polished Elev- coach whether in defeat of victory.

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