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October 30, 1927 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1927-10-30

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ESTABLISHED
1890

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VQL. XXXVIII, NO. 36.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1927

EIGHT PAGES

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POTTER BACKS RIGHT
OF SCHOOL TO EXPEL
AUTO BANIOLATORS
SAYS COURT WOULD UPHOLD
RIGHT OF REGENTS TO
ENFORCE RULING
QUESTION NOT LEGAL ONE
Attorney General Thinks University
Has Necessary Authority To
Discipline Violators
(y Assoiated Press)
LANSING, Oct. 29.-University of
Michigan authorities have the right
to expel students for operating auto-
mobiles, in the opinion of W. W. Pot-
ter, attorney general. Ile forwarded
a ruling to this effect today in reply
to a request from Courtland C. Smith,
president of the University Studet
council.
Th attorney general admitted that
the Board of Regents has no legal
right to prohibit the ownership or
operation of a motor vehicle by a stu-
dent, this right be governed by state
laws which do not discriminate against
students.
Cites Test Case
On the other hand, he believes the
University authorities have the right
to enforce rules deemed necessary
for the conduct of the University. The
attorney general cited a Supreme
court decision in the case of an Ypsi-
lanti co-ed who appealed from her
expulsion for smoking cigaretes. While
(igaret smoking on the street is not
illegal, the Supreme court ruled the
question involved was not one of le-
gality of the act, but of the reason-
ableness of the rules promulgated by
the Normal. The girl's expulsion was
upheld.
"Whether certain conduct or mis-
condu t is legal ground for expulsion
does z1ot depend upon whether the
conduct or misconduct itself is unlaw-
ful under state laws," Mr. Potter's
opion continued. "The smoking of
a pipe in a class room by a student is
not unlawful, but doubtless a student
who persisted in doing so might be
legally subject to expulsion.
Opinion Of Courts
"We are of the opinion the courts
would uphold the authority of the
Board of Regents of the University to
make the regulations relative to mo-
tor cars, and we are of the opinion the
Board of Regents is within its author-
ity in ruling that no student at the
University shall operate a motor veh-
icle, except in extraordinary cases un-
der the direction of the dean of stu-
dents. The enjoyment of attentling
public schools is necessarily condoned
upon compliance with reasonable
rules. Ordinarily school authorities
have the right to define the offenses
fr which the punishment is exclusion.
T the school as in the family there
-ists on the part of the students the
'Obligation of obedience to official com-
4iands.
"There is no' question but that the
power of school authorities over pupils
is not confined to school rooms or,
grounds but extends to all acts of
pupils which are detrimental to the
good order and best interest of the
school whether committed in school
hours or while the pupil is on his way
to or from school or after he has re-)
turned home."
MUSICALE WILL PRESENT
-NCERT TUESDAY NIGHT
Matinee Musicale will present as the
first concert of the year for its or-
ganization the Persenger String Quar-
ttte of Santa Barbara, at the Mimes
theater Tuesday night. This will be

the first of a series of chamber music
recitals to be held at the theater un-
(lor the auspices of Matinee Musicale.
Admission will be by membership ticetj
,only.
The quartette was founded in 1916
m part of the Chambre Music society,
of :.a Francisco by Elias Hecht. It
h'i. siNce that time engaged - in a
traesconlinental tour and been made
, ;anr of the Community Arts associa-
jc:l of Santa Barbara. The group de-'
s it name from its musical dircetor
arA jirst violinist, Louis Persinger. It
ivAaud: ,~in its ensemble Louis Ford
vicliist ; Nathan Firestone, viola, and
~acr Ferner, violincellist.
A mnoag other engagements that the
r71) has played in the past are.the
CC n-l included in the transcontinen-

MEET THE TEAM.
Michigan will support its
teams, win or lose. The football
eleven yesterday, although in aj
losing battle, fought to the veryj
finish, beaten but not crushed.1
The student body is now called
upon to rally to the support of
its team. Meet the squad when
it comes in at 8 o'clock this
morning at the Michigan Central
station.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
RITCHIE WILL SPEAK
IN ORATORICAL SERIES
Prospecti e Presidential Cani date
Will Tak Feb. la, on Subjet
Of Federal Centralization
IS MARYLAND GOVERNOR
Governor Albert E. Ritchie, o
Maryland, will speak in Hill audi-
torium on the Oratorical lecture series
program Feb. 15, it has been an-
nounced by Carl G. Brandt, of the
speech department, who is in charge
of this year's series. This was prev-
iously the only tentative date when
the complete 1927-28 series was an-
nounced, although it was almost cer-
tain at the time that Governor
Ritchie would appear here.
Governor Ritchie, who is rated as
one of the most interesting politcal
figures in America today, and who is
a prospective candidate for the presi-
dency, will take as the subject of his
address here "Centralization of Gov-
ernment." He has ' made a careful
study of the increasing duties of the
Federal Government and their effect
upon state government, one of the
most important political problems of
the day.
The Maryland governor's speeches
on this subject at the recent Gov-
enor's conference in northern Michi-
gan attracted wide attention at that
time.
The next Oratorical number will be
held Nov. 18 when Harry A. Franck, a
graduate of the University of Michi-
gan and recognized as a traveler of
wide experience, will speak on the
topic, "What's Happening in Pales-
tine." Mr. Franck returned in August
from abroad where he made an exten-
sive study of the changing conditions
in Palestine. Much of the material to
be given in his talk here will be in-
cluded in his next story of world
travel soon to be published.
Governor Ritchie's appearance here
will comprise the sixth number on the
1927-28 Oratorical series.
Committee to Choose
Standard Colors o f
Z apes for Graduates
Appointment of a committee from
the University Senate for the consider-
ation of proper colors of capes and
tassels for University graduating
classes was announced yesterday by
Dr. Frank Robbins, assistant to the
President. The committee will set
standard colors before the graduation
exercises next spring.
The last investigation made of this
subject was in 1922, by a similar com-
mittee from.the University Senate, but
since that time three new schools and
colleges, the School of Education, the
School of Education, the School of
Business Adniinistration, and the
School of Forestry and Conservation
have been added to the University,
and oi additional department, the de-
partment of library science.
No provision has thus far been made
for insignia for these new schools and
as a result the present committee will
be called upon to investigate the sub-

ject.
Several inconsistencies have been
pointed out in the University practice
here, Dr. Robbins explained, and these
will. be straightened out before the
next Commencement exercises are
held. The committee appointed will
bring all of the regulations up to
date, according to the general practice
of educational institutions through-
out the country.
Those who will serve on this re-
cently appointed committee are: Dean
George W. Patterson of the Colleges
of Engineering and Architecture, Prof.
C. C. Glover, of the mathematics de-
partment, and Prof. H. P. Thieme of
the Romance languages department.
The Weather

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GOYERNMENT COUNSEL
ENCOUNTER TROUBLE
MANY ESSENTIAL WITNESSES FOR
THE GOVERNMrENT RESIDE
OUTSIDE COUNTRY
WILL REST CASE SOON
Counsel Is Now Undertaking To Proie
That Only Sinclair Is Directly
Implicated
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, Oct. 29-- With the
completion of the story of the opera-
tions of the short-lived but celebrated
Continental Trading Company, Ltd..
of Canada, special government oil
counsel will complete early next weel
the presentation of their case to the
jury in the Teapot Dome conspiracy
trial.
While they have produced witnesses
to connect Harry F. Sinclair witn the
operations of that company, they have
expressed scant hope of any direct
evidence tq show that he ever was in
possession of the $230,500 in Liberty
bonds, which the givernment contends
were once held by the Continental
Trading company and subsequently
obtained by M. T. Eberhart, son-in-
law of Albert B. Fall, and used for
his ownbenefit and for that of Fall,
Just as was the case when civil
suit was tried at Cheyenne, Wyoming,
the government is without the testi-
mony of four men they have sought
to elicit information from. Eberhart
refused to answer a question as to
where he got the bonds, standing on
his constitutional right that he did not
have to answer because his evidence
might tend to incriminate him.
H. S. Osler, a Canadjian citizen,
president of the Continental comp-
any, who, the government has testi-
many to show, directed the purchase
of the bonds for the Continental comp-
any, -is unavailable for a subpoena.
The other two men who, the gov-
ernment counsel contends, could tell
about the Continental company in its'
details, are Harry M. Blackmer. for-
mer chairman of the board of the
Midwest Refining company and James
O'Neill, former president of the Prai-
rie Oil and Gas company. They have
been sojourning in Europe since the
early days of the oil investigation.
In the absence of these witnesses,
government counsel are undertaking
to show to the jury that Sinclair wasj

Illinois .......2
Minnesota .. . .2
MICHIGAN ... 2
Chicago .......2
Ohio State .... 2
Northwestern .1
Wisconsin .... 1
Indiana .......0
Purdue........0
Iowa..........0

0
0
1
1
2
1
2
1
0
0

0
1
0
0
0
0
0
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CONFERENTE S ANI)IG

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'ICK ETS FR H"DULCY
I I
Four Dyit Performance To Be Gvien
At Mimes Theater Beginning
Wednesday, Nov. 2
I'S THREE-A C ITCOMEDY
Seats are now being sold at the box
office in Mimes theater for the run
of "Dulcy," which will be presente
for four performances by Comedy
Club beginning Wednesday. "Dulcy"
is one of the favorite comedy revivals
of the modern American stage, and it
was written by George S. Kaufman
and Marc Connelly, the authors of
"Beggar On Horseback," "Merton of
the Movies," and "The Butter and Egg
Man."
The comedy is in three acts. Phyllis
Loughton, '28, will carry the title role,
I while others in the cast are Charles
D. Livingstone, '28L, William Bishop,
'28, Vera Johnson, '28 and Richard
Woelhaf, Grad. All of the members
of the cast have been seen in numer-
ous campus productions. "Dulcy" has
been directed by Robert Wetzel, '28.
The story of "Dulcy" is that of the
childish and foolish wife who throws
the fortunes of her youthful husband
into jeopardy on several occasions.
Its theme was derived by the authors
I from the column operated by Franklin1
P. Adams in the New York World,
and is replete with farcial situations.
Settings for the comedy are under
the supervision of Frederickk Reb-
man, as is the whole technical direc-
tion.
Tickets for "Dulcy" are priced at 75
cents, and all seats are reserved. They
may be procured by telephone at any
time.
WORK ON CAMPUS FILM
IS PROGRESSING RAPIDLY
Work on the University moving pic-
ture, now being filmed on the cam-

George Rich
Michigan fullback, who played a
fine game yesterday against Coach
Zuppke's team. Rich carried the
brunt of the Wolverine line smashing
attack, and played a good defensive
game.
OFF ICIALS OF SENIOR
BALL TO ELECT HEAD
Senior Class Presidents Must Notify
Comittee Members In Time
To Attend Meeting Monday
WILL CONVENE AT UNION
All senior class presidents of thel

Michigan Fullback
Strong On Defense
AS SUPERIOR ILLINI ELEVE

Il CIGAN ATTACK POWERLESS
AS INJURY FORCES
GILBERT OUT
RICH PLAYS WELL
First Touchdown Comes After Fumble,
While Second Is Made When
Punt Is Blocked
By Herbert E. Vedder
MEMORIAL STADIUM, Champaign,
Oct. 29.-Smart and brilliant football
by one of the greatest teams the
University of Illinois has ever pro-
duced, utterly overcame Michigan's
hard-fighting eleven here this after-
noon for a well earned 14 to 0 tri-
umph. The Wolverines seemed stunn-
ed at the outset by the loss of their
star half back and kicker, Louis
Gilbert, who had been operated on for
an infection of his elbow an hour and
a half before the gamne started. But
in the second half of the game they,
came back to carry the fight to Illi-
nois.
Both of the Illini scores were made
on "breaks" but to Illinois must be
given credit for being smart and
wide awake.
Gklnge Is "Jinx"
For Illinois, a new red headed
comet emprged from Wheaton in thej

N ,;

TAKES AD VANTAGE OF BREAKS

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University must notify the students form of Garland Grange who assum-
on ed the burden of jinxing the Wolver-t
they have chosen for membership ines where his brother left off three
the committee for the Senior Ball in years ago. Puckelvartz, starting hi
time for the first meeting of the coin- first game of the year; drew the, lot of
mittee which will, be held at 5:15 playing a "Marek" part, and fumbled
o'clock Monday afternoon in room Mills' punt on his own 7 yard line,
302 of the Union according to an 'in the middle of the first quarter.
announcemet made yesterday by El- Grange recovered the ball and on the
lis Merry '28 chairman of the Stu- next play, Judd Timm, the . Idaho
dent council elections committee The flash, skirted Michigan's right end,
dntconilthleUions commiytee.The Ibehind blocking and interference that
meeting in the Union Monday willbe was perfect, not a Michigan man
for the purpose of electing a chair- stopping Timm.
:Dan for the committee, and those Illinois' second touchdown came in
classes not represented will lose their the middle of the third period, after
votes. an exchangeofpnswe Mil
l he committee for the senior ball of punts Mills
punted out of bounds on Michigan's
will consist of 15 members, 5 of which pne u fbud nMcia'
18 yard line. Rich failed to gain,
will be chosen by the resident of end Miller's punt was blocked by.
the senior class of the Colleges of Crane. Schultz fell on the ball back
Literature, Science, angh the Arts.
th rnnt~~r~o of the goal line after the oval had'

TO THE STUDENT BODY
IEMORIAL STAIUM, CHAM-
PAIGN, Oct, 29-Your Michigan
football team was great in de-
fense yesterday at Champaign and
fought a hard battle all the way,
even 'when faced with the task of
playing without the services of
Louis Gilbert. They are deserving
of the sincere consideration of
everyone of you students for the
battle they put up. Meet the
team when it comes in at 8 o'clock
Sunday morning.
-Herbert E. Vedder
ing the ball about before he took the
ball around end. A fumbled lateral
pass and two ineffective plays at the
Michigan line were stopped and No-
wack's place kick from a difficult an-
gle failed.
In the closing minutes of the game
Oosterbaan threw long passes to Hoff-
man and Nyland but they were knock-
ed down easily the only result being
10 yards in penalties for the Wolver-
ines. Miller kicked from behind his
goal line as the game ended with the
ball in Illinois' possession.
Zuppke, the Illini wizard, played his
great substitution game with telling
effect in the hot weather, using some
20 men, and proving beyond all doubt
the strength of the reserve material.
LINEUPS
Illinois - Michigan
Grange LE Oosterbaan
Schultz LT Harrigan
Crane LG Palmerolt
Reitsch C Bovard
McClure RG Baer
Nowack RT Gabel
Deimling RE Nyland
French Q Hoffman
Mills LH Miller
Timm RH Puckelwartz
Stewart FB Rich
Officials: Masker (Northwest-
ern), referee; Schommer (Chica-
go), umpire; Hedges (Dartmouth),
'1eld judge; Mumma (Arihy), head
litesman.
BUCKEYES DEFEAT
CHICAGO,_13 TO 7
(By Associnted Press)
COLUMBUS, Oct. 29- Ohio State
snatched victory away from Chicago
here today, 13 to 7, on a 50 yard for-
ward pass in the last period, winning
on the type of play with which the
Maroons constantly threatened the
Buckeye goal line.
Mendenhall, Maroon halfback, har-
ried the Buckeye defense with 16
long heaves goalward, one of which
was completed over the goal but was
called back on a technicality. Anoth-
er time in the ,last few seconds of
play, the Chicago passer hurled the
goal line, just missing the receiver's
fingertips for a play which would have
tied the count.

one of those who guaranteed thepus, is progressing as rapidly as pas- n e go eynrnounded away. Butch Nowack then'
engnerig cllgebythe senior en-ukiced his y second goa k trthen
contract of the Continental company sible, according to an announcement Ikicked his second goal after the
with Humphreys and that, of all the made yesterday from the office of Dr. pneers' president, and one each to be touchdown and the scoring ended.
men concerned in that contract, Sin- Frank Robbins, assistant to the Presi- ntheriet Michigan's first scoring chance of
the ameaine soon after the first!
claim alone had dealings wit Fail at dent. The scenes taken last week in- ege, the law schol, the dental schothlli c gmet Mlernted ut fr
that time, these lealings leading up elude nearly all of the outdoor worli the college of pharmacy, the medical hunois se re. Miller unted out of
to the lease of the Wyomiing naval on the picture, in additon to several c lthe schoolobounds to Illinois' 6 yard line. The
reserve, interior scenes.aI Illini took time out and Zuppke sent1
Thes"e men, mut hbe chosedn th in a flock of substitutes. Whittle
passed to Heston for five yards and
presidents and notified to attend the Rich gained another. Whittle's passI
meeting, according to Merry, since the to Domhoff on the 5 yard line was in- I
chairman may be elected by them complete and on the next play Ooster-
from any school or coaiege on the baan's pass across the goal line was
capus. The election of the chairman grounded, ending the rally.i
will b~e presided over by r Student fg oun sdendinBthesrally.
visory board, the board of directors, council officer, who will turn the Only half a dozen plays later Mil-C
Prof. Tilley Is Chairman Of Board visoth board of dietng meeting and the committee over to ler's 60 yard punt was downed by
Which Chose School Head and the board of trustees. Singing the elected chairman as soon as he is Illinois on her own 16 yard line. The
sby the hoys, acconpanied by the chosen. Illini failed to gain on three plays
Cranbrook School, Michigan's first school orchestra which has already The committees or the other- class Iand Oosteraan blocked Mill's punt
and, at present, her only boys' board- program.parties of the year, with the exception and the ball was dead when it struckt
progrm of the X-1-ors, must also be chosen
ing school, and practically the only' Ciranbrook school opened 'auspic- soth, J-oimsto acsoftehst- an Illinois lineman on the Indian 16
non-military boarding school in this iously this fall with a maximum pos- dent cuncl. T o crs o the yard line. Rich and Miller gained 4
part of the country, celebrated its sible enrollment of 75 boys and a S'ophomore Prom will be chosen by yards. Two passes from place-kick
formal opening Friday night at Bir- faculty of 10. Eventually the enroll president of the sophor.ore n- formation resulted in incomplete pass-
mingham, Michigan. Thb ceremony ment will reach 200, comprising 65 gineering class this year, while the es by Whittle to Miller and Heston,
was opened with an invocation by the boarding and 135 day students, but chairman of the Freshmen Frolic will the second going over the line as the
Right Rev. Herman Page, bishop of for the first three years the registra- be picked by the president of the alf ended.
the Episcopal diocese of Michigan, tion is being limited in order that the freshmen literary class. In the third quarter Gabel recover-
after which the school was formally spirit of the student body may be de- These committees are both smaller ed an Illinois fumble on the Indian 40
presented by its donor, Mr. George veloped along desired lines. than the group in charge of the Sen- yard line. Whittle gained three but
C. Booth. President Clarence C. Lit- The school is located on Lone Pine B Oosterbaan lost ten when he was nail-
tle of the University, in his capacity Road, in the Bloomfield Hills, near terar student n the Som o ed back of the line before he could
as a member of the Cranbrook School Birmingham, Michigan. It is the gift pass. Miller's toss to Domhoff gainedC
board of advisers, delivered the prin- of 11r. and Mrs. George G. Booth of Pr r andsen, five ommalso 14 yards and put the ball back of the
literary freshmen, on the committee Ini38yr lnewhnMlr
cipal address of the evening. Birmingham, and represents an en- for the Frsh Frolic. The first mee Ilnois 38 yard line, when Miller
President Little, suiting his ad- dowment of more than $1,250,000. It ings of these committee will not be punted over the goal line.
'dress to both the older and younger pecupies 65 acres of rolling land typ- held under the direction of the Su- The Michigan team which came out
elements in his audience, took oppor- ical of Oakland county, traversed by dent council, since arrangement is on to the field for the second half
tunity as the theme of his discourse. a branch of the River Rouge which already made for the choice of their seemed to be transformed and fought
Addressing his remarks chiefly to the has been broadened into a lake toh m all the way, carrying the ball to Illi-
boys of the school, he urged thim to meet the recreational needs of the nois' teritory through Rich's power-
use fully the facilities provided by boys. The buildings, of which Eliel ful drives and Whittle's passes. Whit-
,the school to make opportunities, and S'aarinen, noted European architect, STtDENTS ESCAPE tle, playing regularly for the first
having made them, to sieze and pro- is the designer, will be among the INJURY IN RECK time, held up in fine shape, playing a
L perly evaluate them. This should be most beautiful structures in Ameri- nice game but the punch built around
done, he said, with a view to creat- ca devoted to educational purposes. Two Michigan students were badly Louis Gilbert was lacking in the
ing opportunities for others later in At present the plant consists of shaken up early yesterday morning pinches.
life, as Mr. Booth has done in en- the main school building, containing ;:when the Nash coupe in which they ^ iter the Illinois score in the third
dowing Cranbrook School. the astronomical tower, a dormitory, were driving was forced into a tele- period bucks and passes gave Michi-
Commenting on the need of a school an infirmary which has just been phone post on Washtenaw avenue as gan a first down on Illinois' 25 yard
of the Cranbrook type in Michigan, completed, a gymnasium which is. us- they were dodging anotb .r car which line. Richman intercepted Whittle's i
President Little recognized in it a able though not completed, a tempor- suddenly cut in front of them. pass to end the rally as the quarter
vovirnrArfantf 1n'lfn',c nt in the nd-:iirvrilninff-hall. a.house for ~the Plt rrxrvt. 11ai... cT Cliv.. ,nl-.-.a fpnded.

YES T ERDA Y'S
RESULTS w
(By As,-;4i6 iaed Press)
Harvard, 26; Indiana, 6.
Cornell, 0; Columbia, 0.
Pittsburgh, 52; Allegheny, 0.
Yale, 19; Dartmouth, 0.
Princeton, 35; William and Mary, 7.
Washington and Jefferson, 33; Thiel,
Wesleyan, 6; Trinity, 2.
Ohio State, 13; Chicago, 7.
Missouri, 34; Northwestern, 19.
Oberlin, 6; Case, 3.
Boston College, 27; Fordham, 7.
Army, 34; Bucknell, 0.
Penn State, 40;' Lafayette, 6.
New York U., 0; Colgate, 0.
U. of Detroit, 24; Michigan State,

0Q

7.
6.

Purdue, 39; Montana State, 7.
Carnegie Tech., 13; West Virginia,
Minnesota, 13; Wisconsin, 7.
Notre Dame, 26; Georgia Tech, 7.
Marquette, 31; Grinnell, 0.
Kansas, 7; Drake, 6.
DePauw, 6; Franklin, 0.
Nebraska, 21; Syracuse, 0.
Alabama, 13; Miss. A and M., 17.

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