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October 26, 1927 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-10-26

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

. . . . . . .

S. -5"

IN SECONl RUND F INTERCLASS HOCKEY
GAES JU11IO ARE VICTORIOUS OVER THE
SOPHAND SNIORS DEFEAT FESHMEN

MRS. HANLEY TO
INSTRUCT IN GOLF

iPLACES TWO WINNING TEAMS IN
RUNNIG LFORCIASS
CILAMPIO-N SHIPt
ZAUER IS STAR OF GAME
Fast flaying and Geod Teamwork of
Seniors Featiures (Game
With Freslmen
In the second round of the annual
inter-class hockey tournament play-
ed yesterday at Palmer Field, the
juniors downed the .sophomores 5 to
4 while the freshmen were beaten by
the seniors 3 to 1.
The winning teams placed them-
selves in the running for the univer-
sity class championship by their vic-
tories, each team being credited with
two victories in tournament play.
The junior-sophomore game started
slowly and lacked pep. Zaner, star
performer of the afternoon opened the
scoring with a nice 10-yard shot for a
goal for the juniors. The sophomores
came back shortly after with a goal
by Bush. The scoring then alternat-
ed. During the first half the ball
was knocked out of bounds many
times on wild shots and had to be put
into play again with a bully on the 25-
yard line. Play was confined mostly
to the right side and center of the
field and was slowed up considerably
with the players choosing to shoot
carefully and to pass accurately rath-
er than play the usual speedy and
more erratic game.
In the second half the sophomore
team showed a spurt of speed and
came onto the field fighting with
Crane and Sibly scoring successive
goals to place their team in the lead.
Zauer then shot her fourth goal for
the juniors to tie the score, and near
the close of the game put the winning
score across the goal line.
Zauer was the outstanding star of
the game, scoring all five points for
the winning team and playing a won-
,derful defensive game. Cody and
Hartwig also played well for the
juniors. Sibley played a heady game
for the sophomore team, as did Cody
aid Crane.
Senior-Freyhmen Game.
The Senior-Freshman contest was
played fast, with both teams advanc-
ing the ball and play being spread
over the entire field. Child made a
long shot from a difficult angle to
open the scoring. Poor defensive
play on the part of the freshman de-

fensive enabled Welch to put the ball
across for the second senior score.'
However, the freshman defense tight-
ened in the second half and the wholef
team worked hard to keep off the ad-
vance of the seniors.
The seniors displayed the best team-
work, the cooperation on the part of
the halfbacks and forwards being out-
standing. Hoover, Child and Beau-
mont played well for the seniors while
Darrow and Nussbaum were the stars
for the freshmen team.
Lineups.
The lineups for the two contests
were as follows:
Juniors Sophomores
Lyon............ RW ..........Bush
Saixboirn.........RI.........Bielby
Zauer............ CF.........Sibley
Hawkins........ LI .......... Crane
Strasser.......LW...........Stahl
Hartwig (capt.).. RH ........... Guff
Miller..........CH..........Cody
McClure......... LH ........Loomis
LTevine........... RB........Ohleon
Jones..........LB....... Heilman
Mansfield.......G.........Muffly
Seniors Freshman
Baird.......... RW ....Humphrey
Welch ..........RI ........... Reed
Child..........CF..........Eanian
Folson.......... LI .........Domine
Hoover.... .. . LW ......Schnieder
Hough..........RH ...... Nussbaum
Beaumont........CH.......Whitneya
Brummeler......LH..........Felski
Tredwell......... RB .......Darrow
Unsworth..... . ..LB ......... Ded'ch
Hardy..........G.........Kock
Officials: Hodgson, Appelt, Vande-
Water, Bloome.
W. A. A. SPONSORS
3 RIDING GROUPS
W.A.A. riding groups now have a
total of 31 women who have signed up
for the three groups. Group 1 for
those who wish to ride for pleasure
only, has a enrollment of 7. This
gives 50 W.A.A. points and consists
of 12 rides a season.
Group 11 for those who wish to
learn to ride, also gives 40 W.A.A.
points requires 12 rides a season. This
has 9 women who intend to take the
course.
Group III is sponsored by Pegasis
and gives instruction in military drill
in preparation for the horseshow. This
gives the 50 W.A.A. points, or more.
Fifteen women are signed up for this
group.I

Mrs. Stewait IHiley.
Mrs. Stewart Hanley, Michigan's
state golf champion, will be at the
University golf course this afternoon
for the purpose of instfucting those
university women who come to the
course between 2 o'clock and 4:30. To
those women whq have been actively
interested in golf before this year,
Mrs. Hanley's connection with the
physical education department will
need no introduction.
This afternoon is the first oppor-
tunity that Mrs. Hanley has had to
come to Ann Arbor this fall for in-
struction. After winning the state
championship last summer, Mrs.
Hanley made a tour of the country,
playing in many city tournaments and
adding to her long list of golfing
honors. She returned to Detroit only
recently; before the winter season
opens in the South, she has a brief
respite during which she plans to visit
Ann Arbor often.
Undoubtedly, all women who play
golf will take advantage of this after-
noon's opportunity to be instructed by
Mrs. Hanley. In past years, it has
been her policy to give personal in-
struction to each individual.
Aside from Mrs. Hanley's splendid
records, she is greatly interested in
promoting the game. It is in this in-
terest that she gives so much of her
time to the University of Michigan.
This is the third year that she has
been in the Women's Physical Edu-
cation staff without pay.

STUDENT IS SUCCESS
Mairgaret Sliermwai1 27 is Appointed
Women's Editor To Pittsburgh
Post-Gazette
BEGAN AS COLUMNIST
With but seven weeks elapsed to
mark her entrance into theworld of
newspapers, Margaret Sherman, '27,
has achieved a spectacular success in
that field. Joining the staff of the
newly consolidated Pittsburgh Post-
Gazette on September 1st, Miss Sher-
man was promoted rapidly from the
editor of a shopping service column
to the editor of the women's and so-
ciety pages.
When Miss Sherman arrived in
Pittsburgh to accept her promised
position on the Post, she found that
the two morning and two evening
papers had consolidated, with the re-
sult that more than 200 men had been
rpleased by the Post-Gazette. Ap-
proaching the editor with regard to
her position, Miss Sherman was told
"to sell herself to the women's editor."
She was assigned'to a column en-
titled "In The Shops With Polly."
A Chicago woman with many years
experience had been selected to begin
the women's section of the paper. A
few weeks later the society editor, a
journalist of six years experience, was
dismissed. Miss Sherman was assig-
ned the beat which at the time includ-
ed several important social activities,
among them the Westmoreland Hunt
Show and the Babcock wedding. The
object of the reporter on this beat,
Miss Sherman relates, is to obtain the
photographs of society leaders who
are notoriously camera-shy. She was
successful,
Then the women's editor had occa-
sion to resign. Miss Sherman was ap-
pointed to fill the vacancy, and has
now entered into her duties in that
capacity. Miss Sherman attributes
her success to the fact that she has
had well rounded journalistic train-
ing and could adapt herself to the re-
quirements of each occasion. She has
found invaluable also her background
of general training.
Miss Sherman is a member of the
Michigan chapter of Theta Sigma Phi,
national honorary journalistic society
for women, and was awarded the gold
medal for highest scholastic and
journalistic achievements during her
four years here.

IParticipation In Fall{
Is Encouraged ByN
"This Indian summer is ideal for
outdoor sports, especially hiking and
canoeing," says Margaret Ohlson, W.
A. A. manager of' outdoor sports. "If
those of you who come from the west
miss your mountain climbing and long
walks to the village, or if those of you
who come from the east miss your
shopping tours, an eight-mile hike to
Ypsilanti will be a good substitute.
You will derive the greatest pleasure,
and at the same time you will be mak-
ing points for membership in W.A.A.
who will give one point for every mile.
Just before you go on a hike, call
Margaret Ohlson at 3018 and tell her
where you are going so that it will be
recorded if the mileage is approved.
The smallest hike for which points
can be accorded is one of five miles.
The minimum number of miles for a
season is 25.
For those of you who do not think
long hikes are feasible and who like
.short walks, Margaret recommends
the one to the fireplace which W.A.A.
uses. It is on the Cedar Bend drive
near the place-where the tug-of-war
takes place. The fireplace which is
rustic is situated on the side of the
hill below which the river flows. From
here a good view of Ann Arbor is af-
Postpone Training
Class Until Spring
Because of the large expense which
it would entail, the Women's Athletic
Association has decided to dispense
with the plans which were being form-
ulated in regard to the training class-
es for girl scout leaders and camp
counsellors until a later date.
On account of the' numerous things
which are occupying the time of the
women on campus, especially during
the fall season it has been thought
best to begin the training classes in
the early spring. There has not been
enough enthusiasm shown by the up-
perclass women to enable the execu-
tives of W.A.A. to bring the trainer
from national headquarters to super-
vise the classes.
It is hoped, however, that there will
be more interest than, has so far been
manifested, and that by the time the
plans are being made for the summer,
more people will wish to take the op-
portunity which these classes will af-
ford.
DEPAUW- Green tam-o-shanters
will be worn by freshmen girls to
correspond with the traditional green
caps of the freshmen men.
WISCONSIN-Saturday nights from
7 to 11 o'clock are reserved for stu-
dent roller skating and new steps
are tauht.
ILLINOIS- Women in the pro1
duction classes and on the 'props'
committees have substituted coveralls
for the smocks previously worn while
working on the scenery in the vari-
ous sets.
Members of the W. A. A. at the Uni-
versity of Illinois made a ten mile
"bike-hike" to win five points toward
membership in the association.

Outdoor Sports
ew W. A.A. Mlanager 1
forded. It has been the scene of
many "steak roasts" and parties.
Nicholas' Arborteum known as the
boulevard is another popular place for
short walks. There are few who have
not felt the desire to roll down the
hill.
The canoeing season is now open
and parties along the river are com-'
mon. The embankment has excellent
places to land. On the hills are five
or six fireplaces where you can have
a "roast" and a rolicking good time.
In the winter skiing and sleigh pai-
ties will be arranged. The boulevardl
is a skiing playground for all. Ets
small hills can be used by the begin-1
ner and the steep ones by the ad-
vanced.

WOMEN'S LEAGUE
BAZAAR
The Annual Women's. Leagi
Bazaar will be held this yez
Dec. 2 and 3. All house pres
dents, having suggestions c
preferences concerning artiel
j which their houses will contri
( ute, are requested to call Hel<
I Rankin at 4047, between 6 and
I o'clock today or tomorrow.
The following Freshmen volley
games will be played Wednesday
4 o'clock, Group 17 (Soukup)
Group 18 (Taylor); at 5 o'clock, G
9 (Culver) vs. Group 10 (Thon
and Group 11 (Robinson) vs. G
12 (Marshall and Benson).
Intramural hockey games sche
ed for Wednesday are as follows
4 o'clock, Adelia Cheever vs. Le
IV, and League I vs. Pi Beta Phi
5 o'clock, Helen Newberry vs. K
Delta, and Martha Cook vs. Phi (
ma Mu.
Orchesis will meet at 7:45 toi
in Sarah Caswell hall. All men
please be present.

................... ...

NOTICE

Riding, archery, and golf are
branches of all outdoor sports, but
each one has its own manager. These
sports do not come under the general
outdoor sports of which Margaret Ohl-
son is manager.
If you wish to get points for W.A.A.
for pleasure you may do so on the
individual point basis. If you go out
on 12 'activities conducted by W.A.A.,
such as house parties at Whitmore
Lake, steak roasts, and canoe trips
you wil1 receive 50 points.
MORTARBOARD TO
HOLD GLOVE SALE
Glove samples to be used in the
annual sale sponsored by Mortarboard
for the bienefit of the Women's Lea-
gue, are daily expected from the vari-
ous manufacturers to whom requests
have been sent.
As. yet, dates for the sale have not
been set, but plans have been com-
pleted for the thorough canvassing
of all dormitories, sororities, and
league houses, and arrangements have
been made for a booth in University
Hall in order that every campus wo-,
man will be reached. Mrs. W. D. Hen-
derson, heading the campaign for the
Women's League building, is prepar-
ing letters that will pe sent to 500
Ann Arbor matrons..
The gloves will be of washable doe-
skin, in the newest of fall styles and
colors, gloves of the best quality,
and will be priced remarkably low.
Mortarboard earnestly requests stu-
dents contemplating glove purchases
either for themselves or for friends,
or Christmas presents, to investigate
the samples that will be shown.
LONDON- Mrs. Adalin Macauley,
national president of the American.
Legion Auxiliary, enjoyed the thrill
of having the Queen of England tug
at her sleeve to detain her for fur-
ther conversation.
Two women are on the jury which
will decide whether or not Albert Fall
and Harry Sinclair were guilty of
fraud in the Tea-Pot Dome oil'reserve
lease.-
WISCONS'IN-Thirteen women are
enrolled in the University of Wiscon-
sin law school this year.

t
i
7
i

WOMEN'S CLUB
TO HEAR TA
Wilbert B. Hinsdale, Custod
Michigan Archaeology, will give
ture on "The Red lean Passes
the Stage" at a meeting of th
Arbor Women's club in Lane I
be he ldthis afternoon. Dr. j ii
will trace the cultural traits, tb
ulation and its distribution,
country since the earlier days
program is announced for 2:15
and the publi c is cordially inv

Look Here!

Rain Water
Finger

Shampoo
Waving

Hair Dyeing
Oil Treatment and
Haircut
CAYER SHOP
406 E. LIBERTY
Dial 9471
- - - - - - - -

II

.----..

Parisian School

of Dances
Mine. Calliope Charissi, Directoress

TIE LATE

SENIORS

325-327 S. Fifth .Ave.

All kinds of ballroom dances

13

:
i 'a"
r.
',, t
1
Q

Time is slipping by
and our rush
season is nearly

SPECIAL STUDENT OFFER!
Dancing tickets at $5 for 10 lessons if
bought before Nov. 15, can be used all year

r -

i;
,1, .
,' 4
,.

here.

Fri. acid Sat., 4-6, French Conversation, Tea and
French Pastry.
Ballroom dancing, Fri., 9-1, Sat., 9-12.,

The Truth About Antiques
DO YOUR OWN THINKINGO
I maintain that it is not true that "90% of the American women
want to be fooled," the statement of a big dealer of Oriental rugs.
When I objected he replied-"It's true, offer them something at a
bargain and they'll believe' anything."

Gold-Jewelry

Beads,

Avoid the rush
by making an
early apointment

.1:

I

s

for your

MjChiganensian

Portraits

i

MARCEL EFFECT - RINGLET ENDS
No Water Waving Necessary
No Kinky Head Last 6 to S Months
DI 1 IATTIA SPECIAL-COME EARLY
FOR ONE WEEK ONLY
'GENUINE EUGENE WAVE
jlWaves special for $7.00
one week .....i0
Nok xta Chargesr
ii
E FREDERICK -VITA-TONIC
Very special for $8
one week.......
No Extra Charges
11XTRA - SPECIAL - EXTRA
CURLINE-COMPOUND PROCESS
A soft, loose, lustrous marcel effect with Ring-!
let-end. A safe and ,gentle process. Will not
injure the finest texture of
hi...No Extra Charges
EXTRA SPECIAL
I Marcel ............ 75c Steam Treatment I
1Hair Cut ......... 50c and Hot Oil ... $1.75
'Shampoo...........50c henna Pack .... $1.50

WHY BE FOOLED BY TALK OF "SALES. OF ANTIQUESV9
You know and I know that ALL THE REAL ANTIQUES are in
the homes of the very wealthy, who can afford their, now, huge cost;
in the homes where they have been inherited, or in our museums.
You know and I know that the back places of the [Orient, the in-
and Europe's wealthiest firms who can afford to have buyers in the
accessable places have already been combed by the buyers of Americas
Orient ALL TIME, searching out the choice, the old; the unique,
USE YOUR OWN JUDGMENT
When men say that on a sumnier's trip they have combed ,the
out of the way places and found antiques, how much territory could
they cover in a summer in these places so' difficult to reach that rug
buyers of big firms on the job year in and year o6, have not yet
been able to penetrate?
What are Semi-Antiques but second hand rugs, whose first
wear has been enjoyed by someone else, or modern rugs which have
been "antiqued' in the washing establishments not only by subject,-
ing them to 'chloride of lime, caustic sod and acids but in many
cases whose nap has been cut out and dug down with knives. I have
gone alb through these establishments and have seen it done.
Unless you are an expert having taken intensive training under
tuition of men who have made this subject a life long study, or have
yourself gi'ven this subject years of study, get an authority to pass
on rugs offered to you as antiques or do your own antiquing by
buying modern exquisite rugs worthy to be handed down to coming
generations as choice heirlooms.
Yours for honest advertising,
MRS. H. B.MERRICK,
928 Church St., Ann Arbor

Rings,
Mother of Pearl pins.
The smart

.

woman matches
her Jewelry
Wear sparkling
jewelry and

Earrings,
Brooches,
Bracelets,

look your
best.

Paris

Phone
4434
Studio

says "Gold
jewelry is
the thing,"
So we all
M/ust choose

Gold.

619 E. Liberty

Price, 75c, $3

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