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October 16, 1927 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-10-16

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SUNDAY, OCTQDER 1n, 12

THE MICHIGAN DAILY '

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1927 THE MTCHIGAN DAILY

. .. ... ......

UNIVERSITY WILL AODD
LABORATORY TO STUDY
CHILDREN IN SCHOOLSi
DEAN WHITNEY AND PROFESSOR
WOOI)Y MAKE TRIP TO
UNIVERSITIES
WHITNEY PRAISES IOWA
Make Plans To Add U1it For Study Of
Pre-School Chl4 To Curriculum
Of Educational School
A year from next September, the
University of Michigan will have a
complete psychological laboratory for
studying school pupils from the ages
of two years up through the college
grades, if the new elementary unit of
the University High school is com-
pleted by that time, according to Dean
Allan S. Whitney of the School of Edu-
cation who returned from a trip
to severalhmid-western universitieston
Thursday. He was accompanied by
Prof. Clifford Woody of the Education-
al school.
Dean Whitney and Professor Woody
made the trip to collect available data
at the Universities of Northwestern,
Chicago, and Iowa, concerning the pre-
school child and the work in the study
and training of them.,
Dean Whitney thought that the
school for this type of child was best
at Iowa University. Only in the past
few years have educationalists been
turning their attention to the pre-
school child to teach him independ-
ence and care of himself before the
kindergarten age. Psychologists are
now realizing the importance of this
study and are now starting work in
this little-known field. For this pur-
pose, many of the best universities
in this country and elsewhere are tak-
ing up the study to follow up growth
of intellect and other reactions in the
small child, to manhood.
The University of Iowa is a pioneer
in the field, having had means for
studying the pre-school child for sev-
en years. The children from two to
six years of age fall in this class.
Each year, the State of Iowa makes an
appropriation of $35,000 for this study
by the University. There are three
classes: the first for children from
two to four who come and stay most
of the day, eating their noon meal,
sleeping in the afternoon, and learn-
ing to takecare of themselves and
some simple exercises.
Group Division Made
The second group comes in the
morning and retur'ns home at noon.
The third group is of children, four
to five, who learn elementary things
in preparation for kindergarten. .Each
of these groups is housed in spearate
cottages, and in addition there is a
small library building and an office
for the teachers and nurses Parental
groups meet with the authorities in
charge every so often and plan diets
and proper care of their children so
that the co-operation may be better.
At Northwestern and Chicago, there
are no separate cottages, but the whole
plan is on one floor. The same general
idea of care of the children and pa-
rental co-operation is carried out,
however.
VAN TYNE WILL
SPEAK THURSDAY
"The Struggle for the Truth About
the American Revolution," will be the
subject of the lecture to be given by
Prof. Claud H. Van Tyne, of the his-
tory department, Thursday evening.
Oct. 20, in William L. Clements Me-
morial library.
lA

TATLOCK TO GIVE BAND WILL MAKE ONLY ONE TRIP TO OUT OF TOWN
RELIGIOUS SERMON GAMES BECAUSE OF HE AVY EXPENSES FOR C 7ANGES
Rev. Henry Tatlock will speak on Only one trip to an out-of-town foot- greet and entertain the new nn. the Vniversit will huh.
"Changes in the Church's Conception ball game will be made by the Varsi- Aside from the initial cost of prre- Th following day, they will co
of God," inaugurating a series of three ty band this fall, that to Chicago for paring the band for opening appear- peral with the Uiversity of Cli
sermons to be given from the same the Michigan-Chicago clash on Novem- ances, music and other supplies have (ago hand ii the exerciscs on th
pulpit. Dr. Tatlock is thought by many her 5. Lack of sufficient funds is since been purchased and this hasc l: ield. They will probably return cj
to be as advanced in opinions as the reason given for the absence from into the available funds. the same train which will bring th
Dr. Guthrie, though more conserva- the Wisconsin and Illinois games. It is dlefinitely decided, however. [canm iack to Ann Arbor.
tive in his expression and delivery. Each year the band is allowed fiftyIthat the band will be on Stagg Field, The cost 01 the trYn to Chieago
Since retiring from the rectorship cents from the money which is givenChicago, for the game. The organiza- e(stimated to be in the neighbor0oo
of St. Andrew's Dr. Guthrie has spent to the Athletic asshociation by the tion of 75 men will leave here Friday, of $2,000, and will leave insufficien
much of his time in studying and University, out of each student's tui- Nov. 4, on the Michigan Central. They money 1Or another trip to an out-oI
writing. This series.of three address- tion. The money this year was alwill arrive in Chicago Friday evening town game. Treasurer Rlobert Camp
es is the fruit of his labors, and ij little less than usual, due to the to play at an alumni banquet, which bell, faculty advisor of the band, em-
them he has come to some startling slightly decreased enrollment, and to- the Detroit and Chicago alumni of phasizes the fact that many believe
conclusions with regard to the Christ- talled about $3,500.
ian religion and its function in the Of this sum, approximately $1,400
world today. , was utilized at the outset for repairs
to the uniforms, and four new drums. yy Dqo
WASHINGTON-That radio waves These changes were made before the . P. G.--Calinog uSunday, Oct. ,
will penetrate 500 feet or more of rock University opened this Fall, so that
strata is indicated in tests by the bu- when an organization was needed dur-
reau of mines in a mine at Caribou, ig Freshman week, a well-equipped _
Colo. and prepared band was on hand to

5

ilhat l')and may go places and sop fo, i' eDedication Game,'. next weekl
ga ne vey easily. but pointed (oit is yet een're led lyhe bad
that money is spent each tie the oficil, alhongh the Athletc assou-
:nl moves a block along its way. iatmion is planning on their presence.
No Minite confirmation of the Woid is C\'exicer in a day or two con-
if 1 lhot thi Ohio band will be here veining 1w he pnIl fr the O hio band.

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" A

?3-W. P. G.

IDA GOODLANDER WEBB
Coffee House

"T'okio

To

11

Ann Arbor n;, w,,puI!"

Telephone 3189

755 E. U. Ave.

NON-STOP

------- ------- - -

LAUGHTER FLAJIKT

HANGING UP ANOTHER WORLD': I LW&D

Special Chicken Dinner, 12-2 p. m.
A la carte, 5:30-8 p. m.

This modesty

registers the length of

laughs. This uproarous

comedy has in

store for you-better come early Sunday and
be prepared to go the limit in fun.

I.

&DO

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You can always bring your friends here with the positive
assurance that you are treating them to the best.
Don't Forget that on Sundays we serve the
best Chicken Dinner at One Dollar.

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' t k 76 'tr'2j[+ 114 ~ . Y' ~//
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ivy

Board by Week
Single Meals

Private
Party Rooms

Not Cafeteria - Ladies Invited
Cor. State and Washington

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OR P H E U
THEATER iM
NOW
SHOWING
1. ?
Silver
Vale

the Seasons
The function of the Electric
AirHeateris tomake aroom
comfortably warm in the
chilly mornings and eve-
nings that come so frequent-
ly before the house furnace
is started.
The Electric Air Heater does not
take the place of the furnace. It
supplements it. An electric heater
is simply a quick, convenient, and
inexpensive means of heating a
cold room when you want it
warmed, and for as long or short
a time as you may desire.
Even in full furnace, season it will
often be found desirable to have
it at hand, especially in the bath-
room mornings.

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What's the Good of Being a Fireman
If You Can't Have a Flame!
Even a wetter burg than Rome would have
gone up in smoke while the Fire Department
and the Police Department argued over who
SHOULDN'T save the town old-maid.
Here's a laugh conflagration that will burn
up your blues!

Supported by('owaed iaus (4 a lore
SAN I~i I)YT--111- fl" STE l)MA
~J N M JIO E-T1PI NCARRt

" 9YI,

PteMAE BUSH
I tO >

The Electric Air Heater is portable
\ . aa ran be used in anv rmm where

L ocails

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