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October 14, 1927 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-10-14

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R 14, 1927THE MICHIGAN DAILY

EBERBACH RELA! TES DETAILS OF
SUMMERHS WORK IN LARADOR
SPENDS INTERESTING SUMMER WITH
NOTED LABRADOR PHYSICIAN
AS MEDICAL CHIEF

APPOINTED CHIEF
OF PHONE WORKS

"Labrador, although little is known
about it by most people, is an intense-
ly interesting land and completely fas-
cinated me during my stay there this
summer," stated Dr. Carl Eberbach of
the University hospital who spent 3
months there this summer with Dr.
Wilfred Grenfell, internationally
known figure, who is f'amous for his
work among the people of Labrador,
Dr. Eberbach continued, discussing
Labrador: "The entire coast is ac-
cessible only by sea in the summer
time and .by dog-team in the winter.
It is all the more interesting because
so little is. known of the interior.
Each summir there are many wrecks
caused by the terrible intensity of
the frequent fogs thereabouts. Schoon-
ers of all sorts are wrecked there re-
gardless of the expert guidance of
skilled pilots."
No PractIeiouer Before Grenfell
Before the coming of Sir Wilfred
Grenfell, more commonly known as
Dr. Grenfell, there was practically no
medical aid at all from Hudson Straits
to Belle Isle, according to Dr. Eber-
bach. Nbt only the poverty of the peo-
ple, but the dangers of the coast
making it extremely difficult for a
man to get around at all, prevented
any doctor from attempting to set up
a private practice there. Sir Wilfred
decided to take the challenge offered
by this strange land and he piloted his
own boat across the sea from Englaiid
to Labrador. In his first years there,
Sir Wilfred practiced medicine and
surgery under the most difficult hand-
icaps. He frequently performed major
operations in the most miserable fish-
ermen's *shacks.
Later Sir Wilfred, seeing clearly the
necessity'of hospitals, set out to build
several of them. Commenting on this
project, Dr.Eberbach said, "It is dif-
ficult for us to appreciate the prob-
lems which presented themselves in
the construction of these buildings
in remote parts of the coast, but we
can perhaps imagine the difficulties
in a smaller way when we realize that
all the materials had to be shipped on
fishing schooners, all the heating and
lighting equipment had to be assem-
bled by the unskilled hands of the
natives, and that in order to install
the gigantic heating plants, it was
necessary to. assemble the boilers in
New York, ship them on schooners to
Labrador, and then wait for the com-
ing of snow and ice to move the ma-
terial to the site of the building. The
four hospitals are located at St. An-
thony, Battle Harbor, Spotted Islands
and Indian Harbor."
Patrols Coast Regularly
"Though these hospitals secure for
the people an assurance of fairly ad-
equate medical aid," continued Dr.
Eberbach, "Yet there are very great
distances between them. In order to
help the situation and accomplish the
unification of the medical mission es-
tablished there, Sir Wilfred patrols
the cost regularly when the sea is not
covered by ice in his steamer, the
Strathcona. The coming of Sir Gren-
fell, known to the villagers as " the
doctor," is by far the most important
event of the year in most of the plac-
es visited. In addition to his import-
ant medical work, Sir Wilfred per-
forms many other functiOns. In his
capacity of magistrate, he performs
marriages, settles any legal cases
which may come up in the communi-
ties, and is generally helpful to the
villagers in their various needs and
difficulties.
Dr. Eberbach was in charge of all
medical work on the trip made by the
Strathcona this summer and perform-
ed every function of a general prac-
titioneer. He found many unusual
types of cases and many seldom seen
diseases in the course of his work
there. Many of. the diseases were
found to be of an occupational na-
ture, caused by the labors of the
fishermen.
Eberbacl Praises Aid
Dr. Eberbach continually praised
his co-worker, Sir Wilfred, whom he
characterized as being, "the finest

personality with whom I have ever
come into contact." He said further
that Sir Wilfred is a man of extremely
versatile talent. He is a wonderful
sport, 'an excellent writer, a pilot of
no mean ability, as well as a master
in his own profession.
Dr. Eberbach had one dangerous
experience last summer while cruis-
ing with Sir Wilfred aboard the
Strathcona. As they were sailing
azlong one day in August, a fog sud-
denly enveloped them, a fog so dense
that it was impossible for a man to
see an object a foot away from him.
In his usual manner Sir Wilfred pi-
loted the ship on through the tur-
bulent waters fearlessly, continuing at
full speed. They were unexpectedly
thrown to the floor by a jolt, the ship
suddenly flundered over on its port
side, shipping water, and then right-
ing itself. The group got back into
the boat, bailed out the water, and
regained land soon, feeling that they
had had a most fortunate stroke of
luck in the righting of their ship.

New X-ray Machine
In Lecture Classes
Aid To Group Work
F.cilities for the demonstration of
a ilms, slides, and anatomical
ins to large groups are pro-
vide(- in a new type of projector just
purehased; by officials of the Medical
Dr. Preston M. Hickey and Dr. Har-
_ev Ilaines, of the medical school, wit-
( the first performance of the
projector yesterday afternoon and
statedl that it was more than 'satisfac-
tory. The machine will be of particu-
lar advantage in the showing of X-
ray films, they said, because it pro-
jected an nmlarged "image df the
film on the screen with startling
sharpness of detail.The picture could
be seen very clearly from all parts
of the room, sorthat many students
can be taken care of at one showing.
The old type of demonstrating box
could be used only for small groups.
In addition to the demonstration of
X-ray films, the projector is capable
of showing enlarged images of book
illustrations, pictures, drawings,band
the like. Another attachment to the
machine permits the showing of in-
struments, specimens, or othersmall-
er objects. The regular lantern slid-
es can also be used when necessary.
Doctor Hickey was very enthusias-
tic after the showing and stated that
the machine was a decided improve-
ment over the older methods of class
demonstration.

BEGIN PLANS FOR
FORMAL BANQUET
Panhellenic will hold a formal ban-
quet October 31 at the Union under
the chairmanship of Miss Esther Rick-
er, '29. Definite plans are being exe-
cuted by the various committees
which have been announced as fol-
lows: ticket committee, Helen Black-
wood, '28, chairman, Isabel Stone, '28,
Jean Hegwood, '30, Elizabeth Cronin,
'28, decoration committe, Vera John-
son, '29, chairman, Constance Sidder
'28, Dorothy Straub '30, music, Irene
Drueke '29, invitations, Lois Porter
'28, and scholarship cup, Margaret
Hughes '28.
.............. ... .......... .......

makes ladies

prefer

40
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pipe-smokers

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Edgeworth.

SWEETLAND
The House of Quality
Hot Lunches }
Toasted
Sandwiches
Waffles
212 South Main
..... .... .... . s . .a-a-a-- --_- -_--

We have just completed installing
the latest machinery for dry clean-
ing, pressing, and dying. Your
clothes will have absolut-ely no odor
and will lcok lke new oft er being
cleaned by this new process.
WHITE SWAN LAUNDRY CO.
Branch Office Opposite Mai
Open from 7 a. m. to 8 p. m.

Stanley S. holmes
Of Riverside, Ill., who has just been
appointed chief of the second largest
telephone works in the world at Kear-
ney, N. J. This is the eastern branch
of the Western Electric, Inc. Their,
other branch at Hawthorne, Ill., is
the largest in the world and covers
hundreds of acres.

i

L" ........... .. .......,.,.....,.......,...

ON TO WISCONSIN-
Is the cry today, but Sunday it
will be "Let's Rest." Here is the
place to rest and have a well

Splendid Art Materials
Those who use artists' materials find Wenzel's a
good place to buy them. We have a good stock of
quality materials in which you'll be interested.
DEVOE
ARTISTS' MATERIALS
CaIvas Canvas Board
Academy Board Stretcher Pieces
Water Color in Tubes Fitted Oil Color Boxes
Water Color Boxes Art Stencil Sets
Stencil Outfits Plaque Frames
Artist's Brushes Clay Moulding Outfits
Oil Colors in Tubes Oil
Kraft May
)E CORA 11 TRANSFER SOLUTION for transferring newspaper
prints to fabrics, papeP, lamp shades, etc. BOTTLE, 25c,

The place to eat what you want and how you want it
is here.

Be Sansfied.1"

Dainty sandwiches and a hot cup . of chocolate
will just hit the spot on these cool fall days.

or coffee

cooked satisfying meal.

Those

who remain in town will find it
a treat to have dinner here Sat-
urday night*

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PASTELS.

"A Box of Prekete's Sweets
Makes a Happy Home"
SUGR BE'S
P SUGAR BOWL

Single colors and assorted in boxes.
Get your pastels at Wenzel's

109 South Main St.

Radio Music

Private Booths

WOLVERINE CAFE

WENZEL'S

Pleasant Surroundings

. Excellent 'Service.

Phone 6713

2017 E. Liberty St.

The Pride of Ann Arbor
Opp. Wuerth Theater

'>'

__. ,.

.-.................................6~

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............................. I ............ I .....................................

....................

Collegiate

Clothes

Shop,

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SEE!

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Walk

-Over

1'49

Jake

The Wisconsin Game

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Walk in water or
winter slush without
rubbers and have dy
'feet in this genuine
imported S c o t c h
Grain. Comes in
Tan or Black.,

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HILL AUDITO0.0R IUM

$10.00

A

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b
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Admission 50c, Gallery 35c

F;
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j
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Doors Open at 2:15

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XM. . . . . . . . . . .. .rXX3....X : t
SODA LUNCHES
G 1H

Falb ' pcoats

Gridgraph, tomorrow, Hill Auditorium

Doors Open 2:15

The right weight
for brisk weathcr

Every Under-
graduate~ knows
that Walk-Overs are style leaders. A sur-
vey of shoes worn by college men,
anywhere, proves it.

Good wearing
Good loking and-
Not expensive

See the Wisconsin game on the Gridgraph

I

tomorrow, 2:15

Adler Collegian and R. & W. Clothes
At

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11

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