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October 11, 1927 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-10-11

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I

1 ''

IT IfLAL rhtLLHU1 II
SCQREfBY7 W YOR1
EKINS ER41O9 BY TALKING 0.
CHARACTERJSTICS OF
SUJPERNATURAL
DISCUSSES VANY P}INT!
Dr. W. N. Guthrlie of New York Speak
On Subjiee f "Can We Have
Acess To a Livng Jesus "
Speaking in0St. rAndrew's Episcop
Church, Sunday, on the subject, "Ca
We Have Aecess to a Living Jesus
Dr. W. N.- Guthrie, modernist clergy
man of New York, lashed the typica
"preacher as a "glorious pussyfooter."
$eginning his sermon with a dl
sertation on the characteristics c
angels, the Rev. Guthrie proceede
to discuss the subject of what a
angel is. "Is he a young man,t
messenger, or a mechanical cash reg
ister?" asked Dr. Guthrie. When h
reached this point he interrupted hi
sermon to remark that such a dis
cussion as he was then carrying o:
'was never mentioned by a "respecta
ble preacher."
Dr. Guthrie then said that in hi
opinon arch-angels were merely sym
hos and nothing more. He remarke4
thia.t'h had never seen an angel and ha
never known any one else who had
xG9d Has Imaginaton
Proceeding from this point, the Rev
Guthrie stated that God has more im
agination than most people realize
'In this connection he commented tha
the world is a great zoo and huma
beings are only one species aboni
the many who inhabit the earth, add
ing that people have, as a genera
rile, rather les. orals than the ant
and bees.
In the next ph fe of his sermon the
Rev. Guthre spoke on the inconsist
ency of men, saying that this was onl
natural and that a consistent huma
iould be putunder glas. Acording
to Dr. Guthrie, that is why Shakes
peare is great, because he was no
mechanical, a d hence, was human
At this point Dr. Guthrie digresse
into a discussion of the vagaries o
newspaper reporters, saying that h
was sorry for them but that they did
cause him a great deal of tro-
ble by inaccurately reporting his
speeches.--.
"fi9ust Fiy Real Jesus"
The Rev. 'Guthrie then began the
m in portion of his sermon with th
statement that we must find the rea:
Jesus. According to Dr. Guthrie; we
know but little of what Jesus was
like, and we do not understand him
at all. Dr. Guthrie remarked that
it was impossible to fit the Christ
into the so-called doctrine of attone-
ment, which' doctrine, 'in the ' Rev.
' lthie's opinhon,tis both bad ethic
and bad psychology.
Dr. Guthrie then emphasized the
fact that people of today are faced
with two equally horrible alternatives
in religion, the Roman and the
rotestant churches, both of which,
in Dr. Guthrie's opinion, are out-
'worn.
Dr. Guthrie then declared that we
must study Jesus. We must find what
interested him, he said. In this way,
we may in time reach the real Christ.
According to Dr. Guthrie, the Jesus
set before the people in the Bible it
a person who would have been un-
.eua to establishing a religion. Dr.
G-uthrie further stated that the usual
decent person never gets anywhere.
ie said, "You have to be wicked
enough to put it over."
Dr. Guthrie then ! concluded liis
sermon with a parable to the effect
that one must suffer an ordeal to

find and understand Jesus.
Large Force Handles
Crowd In Town For
Game On Saturav
hirty-five state policemen aug-
mented by 30 volunteers from the
Ann Arbor police force found that
their problems in handling the crowds
-at the Michigan State game were con-
siderably lessened from that of a
week previous.
Last Saturday's crowd, much small-
er than was expected and unhamper-
ed by adverse weather conditions,
found parking space easily accessible
to the stadium. Police officials ex-
pressed themselves as very well sat-
isfied with the way the traffic wai
handled.
Plans are now being made for what
will undoubtedly be the largest foot-
ball crowd ever to see a game in Ann,
Arbor when the Michigan stadium will
be dedicated a week from Saturday
before the game with Ohio State uni-
versity. All estimates put the proba-
ble crowd at between and 85,000 and
90,000.
Expressed in terms of cars, police
oficials are expecting that as many as
25,000 out of town cars will flood the
city. To handle this crowd it is
expected that in addition to the 30
local officers, there will be 50 state
policemen, while probably 30 more
will be on hand from Toledo and half

Naval Aviation Department Begins Work
Under Officer And Faculty Instruction
Under the charge of It, Charls DI. nouncement. Out of 2 eligibt r:
Williams and LT. Louis 1R. Marshall, pects last year only nine were se
the University of Michigan naval lected for flying. Students eden in
aviation department i- getting under down 'on eyesight and heart trouble.
way, according to an announcement No chances are taken with those who
made yesterday. The course in naval fail in the slightest to pass the v
aviation consists of two sub-courses, and heart disease exanination, as lh"
theory of flight, and sea navigation department is bent on eliminatin ; 1
The latter course is given by Prof. sources of accident.
department, and the"former course"i' Ann Arbor includes such supjects.
taught by Prof. E. A. Stalker,. The aerology, structure; and rigging o
number of students enrolled in the aeroplanes, sea navigation, aerial
courses reaches over 150. navigation, and aeroplane motors. It
Upon successful completion of his is interesting in that it turns the
school course, a student is eligible educated minds to the work hereto-
for actual flight training, leading to a fore monopolized by ion-college men.
commission as ensign in the United The University of Michigan is one of
States naval reserve and qualification the special colleges assigned by the
as a United States naval reserve avi- United States navy to have this course
ator. in its curricula. -The work ac-
Flight training will be given at the complished at Michigan has been of a
Great Lakes Training station of the high order, as unofficial notice ha
United States navy, (ue of the best been received stating that the eight
equipped stations in the world. The students sent from here have been
training at this station lasts for 45 doing extremely creditable work in
days, after which time the student is the naval flying schools.

P IS TIN ('T I V E

F ( OTWE ARi

r
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/ioAt

The
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Vew

77%f HOIN

StadiumI

Ten Dollars

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An exclusive oxford specially constructed for fall and
wInter wear may be had in both black and tan imported Scotch
grain
at
&w 31.R 1ItrlIjy 1W111t 4p

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allowed to take another 45 day course
at the training station at Hampton
Roads, Virginia. Both training courses
consist of about 20 hours instruction
and about twice as much solo flying.
After the second 45 day period, the
student may, if he chooses, enlist in
actual active training for one year.
The greatest stumbling block for
the prospective aviators is the physi-
cal examination, according to the an-
Dr. Cranage Speaks
On Lives Of Monks
(Continued from Page One)
for the monk who spent most of his
time there. The south walk contained
lavatory.
Around the square were outhouses,
\the gatehouse, infirmai'y, business
quarters and the guest house. The
monks were instructed to greet every
stranger as though he was the return
of Christ. 'One would run out to meet
the'guest while two more would pros-
trate themselves before him.
The monasteries gained wealth and
power in England and at the time of
Henry VIII, the church system was
reputed to be worth $500,000,000.
Their dissolution was a source of
revenue to the king, and while he left
the cathedrals, and cathedral-monas-
teries stand he destroyed most of the
others. The ones that felt this the
most were the poor who had received
material assistance from the monks.
It is not thought that the monks led
a complete mental life. Atfirst they
did all the agricultural work but later
the part monk, part layman took over
this work. To the monk time meant
nothing for he had about 50 years of
life in the monastery, and he went
about his work thoroughly and
leisurely.

Mt

_ '.

Naval reserve officers receive two
months base pay for each year, 'pro-
vided they fulfill the requirements of
36 drills during the winter, or ap-
proximately one drill a week. Equiva-
lent duty for these drills may be per-
formed by helping instructors in the
classes at the University, or by doing
active flying at the army or navy sta-
tions. In addition, two weeks' active
duty is required of each officer during
the summer. During this period, he
receives full pay, plus 50 per cent for
flying duty.

Specialized Fiting Service

NiCKELS'

ARCADE

Subscribe For the Weekly

COLORADO - Twenty fellowships
anal scholarships have been awarded
by the faculty of the graduate school
this year.

i
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FOOTBALL

THE RAE MOVIE
Now back to normal-te tight
is over
We are prond to offer
DOUG FAIRBANKS
II a United Artisctz production
The Black Pirate
pI

.,
1
z
i

t
I
I
,

h a Champ
Polo champ-
ion hu h get-
_ Nat
mom nDational

I %

a

MICHIGAN

VS. WISCNSIN

pecial Train

$13.60 for the round trip
at Madison, October 15th

)

I

Via Michigan Central and Chicago, Milwaukee and St.
Leaves Ann Arbor ...............9:00 p. m. C.
Arrives Madison ................8:30 a. m.

Paul.
T.

Thursday and Friday
Slide Kelly Slide
With Will. HAINES and

SALLY WINE IL

. .

ORS FOR RENT"
Wuerth Orchestra
T~4ic~" aw R."DSOY T"adCharle,;'I zy in "1S-veev!Ad1i~li"

Le
Ar

Returning:
Raves Madison ................8:30 p. m.
rrives Ann Arbor .............. 7:30 a. m.
tickets now on sale at Michigan Union, 11 a. m
5 p. m. Daily and at the

This "Ad" with 10 cents

' 7
.

. to

MICHIGAN

CENTRAL

TICKET

OFFICE

_________________________________ u

sSTATE
iPictur'es

. . -

i

y l . ;
*, , ,
' 1

-*

NOW!
SHOWS
DAILY
2:00
3 :30
7:40

dmlk,

PRICES'
MATINEES
Jo
fOc
40c
NIGHTS
70c

SI'AG4

I.
I'
,;

l 9'

NOW
SHOWIN ~

THEATRE

%'

N~OW
SHlOWING

i
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j~b is the.

il

In all my years as a paid -)cs{ of movie palacee,
I have never seen such k.main pPTur_, eranied
2 r .r reh o his W ntic prod ne n

ROBERT
(Editor

ofJ'f S;)

The Greatest Myster)
Film Ever Produced

With
LAURA LA PLANTE
And a Big Cast of Stars
The .launted House.....Creepy
Thrills.... Spooky Shadows...
Slinking Footsteps......Erie
Laughiter...... All combined in
one Masterpiece
On the Stage
ROXY LA ROCCA
"Wizard of the Harp"
Added Features

J
. I

Ii'
r-~

hascinatng..Sparkling! hrilling! GR AfI
Here is indeed the picture of the year-The
- BARRY MORES f

picture
ct the
kn out-
rnark in,
scre' -

h~is wit made him leader
of the vagabonds
m . -- I -.u

His romance&land Tip
nearly upset him

I

I ar fit l ts THRSD1IAY

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