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October 08, 1927 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-10-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PLAS T' RFOEST
IDL LLANDSU O CUBA
MADE BMTHW
FORESTRY PRO'ESSOR ENGAGED
AS CONSUI/ ING ADVISOR
OF FtUlCOMPANY
TEAK TO UPPLANT CANE
Cuba Beginning to Realize All Land
Not Suitable for Raising
Sugar Crops
Despite his regular duties as an
instructor in the School of Forestry
and Conservation, Prof. Donald M.
Matthews acts as consulting forester
for the United Fruit company and the
Cuba company. These concerns are
proposing to reforest lands in Cuba
how idle. Professor Matthews spent
the summer in Cuba planning fot the
estaiblishment of forest plantations
andsexperimenting with the types of
trees suitable to the climate of the
1ountry.
"Cuba was hard hit by the drop of
sugar prices after the war," Professor
Matthews sald. "Prices dropped from
twenty cents a pound to two and one-
half cents for raw sugar. Consequent-
ly, sugar cane could not be raised at
a profit and a great amount of the
land which had' been cpltivated be-
fore will now have to go out of cu -
tivation. The two companies men-
tioned have over 30000 acres of
idle land now.
Valu *alized
"Tle ttUited F'huit coinpany and the
Cuba" cohnpaity ave realized a con-
si erable amounnt' of uncultivated
lands could be used by planting for-
ests on te&i. The sugar industry ex-
panded greatly during the war and
a concurrent decrease of forested
lands was noted. Recent agricul-
tural expahs'ion has been brought
about at the expense of forest areas.
The forest asset has been largely de-
stroyed, and although the pockets of
the present generation have not yet
felt it, the large areas of idle land
represent a great economic loss which
will have to be measured, not only by
the cost of imported timber, but also
by the gradual reduction in the value
of the soil upon which successful ag-
riculture depends."
All Land Not Suited
'Cuba is just beginning to realize
that all of her land is not suitable for
the produdtion of sugar. An effort is
being niade to curtail the utilization
of the land for the raising of sugar
crps. Porests have been suggested
s a sustitute. A carefulexamina-i
ti6n of the retnaliing forests of Cubaj
showed that the yield per' acre was
very low. The only species of trees
which have rapid growth, such as
niagany and cedar, have practically
been exterminated in Cuba. Two
small experimental nursuries have
been established by Professor Mat-
thews in Cuba to experiment with
new trees suitable to Cuban soil.
Artificial propagation of such valua-
ble species as mahogany, cedar, and
teak have been successful in Trini-
dad and Venezuela, according to Pro-
fessor Matthews. Such trees may
prove to be successful in Cuba, Pro-
fessor Matthews 'believes, and may
help to utilize lands which are now
unproductive.
Although Professor Matthews has
now accepted a permanent position
with the School of Forestry and Con-
servation his services have been re-
tained by the United 1'ruit coinpany
and the Cuba company as a consult-
ant, and he will visit their .roerties
in Cuba twice a year to advise them
on forest matters.

TRAIN SERVICE FOR ALL
OUTSIDE GAMES PLANNED
Football fans, wishing to attend the
Wisconsin or Illinois games away
from home this season, will be serv-
ed by special trains, Michigan Cen-
tral railroad officials announced to-
day.
A round trip fare of $13.60 has
been secured for the Madison trip
the train leaving Ann Arbor at 9:00f
o'clock, eastern standard time, Oct.
14, and ariving in Madison at 8:30
Saturday morning. The return trip
will start at 8:30 Saturday evening,
the special arriving back in Ann Ar-
bor at 7:30 Sunday morning.
Pullman reservations will be $9.00
round trip for lowers and $7.00 round
for 'uppers.
Specials for the Illinois game to be
played at Urbana Oct. 29, will leave
Ann Arbor at 10 oclock, central stand-
ard time, Friday evening and arrive
at Champaign at 7:30 Saturday morn-
ing. The return trip will start at
10 o'clock Saturday night.

DETROIT WORLD FLYERSARE
HOME AFTER GLOBE CIRCLINGI

OTHER MICHIGAN SPORTS

DETROIT-Coach Dorais of theI
University of Detroit picked Jim
Thorpe as the greatest football player
of all time.

IOWA CITY-Jniversity of Iowa
will only broadcast those football
games this fall for which the stadiurl
is sold out.
TEXAS-Excavation has be-n s art
ed for the Varsity's new baseball dia-
mond.

u - a __ _

VARSITY TO MEET.
DETROIT GOLFERS
Eight golfers representing the Uni-
versity of Michigan will meet a team
from the Detroit Country Club in a
match over the Washtenaw Country
club course this morning. Play will
be in foursomes, the girst quartet tee-
ing off at 10 o'clock.
Michigan will present a strong
lineup in today's match. Captain Ad-
dison Connor and Dave Ward are
scheduled to play in the first four-
some. John Bergelin and Al Vyse,
both lettermen from last season, will
face the second Country club pair,
In the third match, Ralph Cole and
John Glover, both members of the
1926 golf squad, will oppose two
Detroit players. Wenzull and Crane
will represent Michigan in the final
foursome.
Opposed to the Wolverines will be
some of the best players in the De-
troit district. Jimmy Standish, who
will lead the Country club aggrega-
tion, is one of the best known golf-
ers in the state. He has held both the
Michigan amateur and Detroit district
championships several times. He is
also a member of the executive com-
mittee of the U. S. Golf association.
C. Gilbert,*Waldo is another strong
player on the Detroit team. He has
been a prominent figure in Michigan
tournaments for many years. Two
other veterans of Detroit golf will
participateragainst the Wolverines.
Wyllie Carhartt and J. Alden Plan-
chard.
Tom Paddock, a former member of

VARSITY PLAYERS TO MEET
PROMISING NET PROSPECTS
Six players from last year's
tenis squad will meet a team of
six Varsity prospects at 9:30 o'-
clock this morning on the Ferry
field courts. The Varsity play-
ers will be Captain Barton,
Moore, Shaeffer, Marshall, Gold-
smith, and Kempner. Those to
compete for the Varsity pros-
pects are Graham, Marsh, Elliott,
Haney, Bacon, and Brodie.

II,
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URBANA--Garland Grange, broth-
er of Red, is showing up well as
an end on the Illinois football squad.

i
s
s

Wal

0OVer

the Princeton golf team, will also re-
present the Country club. His play in
the Detroit district in recent years
has been of high calibre. Burke and
Pangs will complete the Detroit line-
up.
Play will be contested in both in-
dividual matches and foursomes this
morning. S'coring in the foursomes
will be under the Nassau system, a
point being awarded for low ball on
each hole.

' '~--
Rough stuf!
An occasional jab in the face is not as bother-
some as the constant annoyance of ill-shaped,
ill-fitting shoes.
it's your own fault if your feet are not 100%
comfortable. There are shoes made to fit you;
shoes that wIll give you comfort from the first
minute you wear themn; shoes attractive in
pattern and authentic in style--Walk-Overs.

""""""""""""

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TIE RAE

-- ow-
Dioil e Sho w
Mostly Comedy
-Sunday-
A CK IPOXTE in
-boon-
"SIide Kely d!"
TTIE RAE

I

Edward F. Schlee, left, and William S. Brock, Detroit flyers who ar-
rived home early this week after abandoning their round-the-world flight
in Japan. Bottom, they are shown with their plane, the Pride of Detroit,
as it was being unloaded from the steamer in San Francisco.

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You can always bring your friends here with the positi
assurance that you are treating them to the best.
Don't Forget that on Sundays we serve
best Chicken Dinner at One Dollar.

ive
the
S

I

I

Will Michigan Defeat

Chicago?

_..

Round T --$25-Round Trip
Two days, two nights in Chicago.
Seven meals.
Here is your chance to see Micgan register another
Victory. Let's ~ollow The Team!

g'oi I )Ok~v. forall
ger style,
tci( (Oi'iftrt may be
' n r1or Black
$8.00's ¢

RESERVATIONd S W
Adair Excursibh tdnbpia-fly
Flint-413 F. P: SMA 14dg.
Ann Airbor-11 Nikeh Arcade.
Biddles Book Store (After ot. 15)

Hleavi1esfofal
Again we anticipate the demand with
Walk-Overs of plump leathers and sturdy
soles--oXfords that will be good throgh.
out the winter.

Board by Week
Single Meals

Priyate
Party Room.

Not Cafeteria - Ladies Invited

Cor. State and Washington
c "rrrir .i~.rrns :m.r... J ,.rrrr ..rr naol..0

L

Walk-Over Boot Shop
1l South gain St.

I -- .- m

Collegiate

- Clothes

- Shop

SUNDAY. CHURCH SERVICES

I

A

FIRST METHODIST
CHURCH

11

Corner State and Washington Sts.
Arthur I. Stalker, D.D., iiister
Parelcy C. Binghami, Associate
Minister and Student Director
14:30-"Life's Best Strategy."
12:00-Student Sunday School in
Wesley Hall. Rtalph Johnson on
"We Pdiy for Wha a kfP~ le."
6:04-Wesleyan Guild Devotional
Meeting. Sinforoso Padilla,
Leader.
7:30-"Faith Triumphant."
THE UNITARIAN CHURCH
State and Huron Streets

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
R. Edward Sayles, Minister
Howard I. Chapman, Minister for
Students
10:45-Morning Worship. Mr.
Sayles preaches on,
"USN YOUR OWN SLING."
12:00-The Church Bible School.
Dr. Bunting, Supt.
12:00--The Guild Bible class meets
at Guild House, 503 E. Huron.
Mr., Chapman leads in study
pf Jesus' Ethical Teachings,
5:30-The Friendship.Hour for
,better acquaintance.
6:3{-The Devotional Hour. Miss
Lulu Anderson, Grad., will talk
on "That Something." (Recent
book title.)
FIRST CHURCH OF
CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 South Division Street
10:30 a.m.-Regular Morning Serv-
ce; Subject, "Are Sin, Disease
and. Death Real ?"
11:45 a.m.-Sunday School follow-
ing the morning service.
7:45 p.m.-Wednesday evening tes-
timonial meeting.
,1Te Reading Room, 10 and 11
State Saving Bank Building is open
daily from, 12 to 5. o'clock, except
Sundays and legalHolidays.

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Corner Iiurowi and Division
Merle H. Anderson, Minister
Dale II. Moore, Associate.
Mrs. ellie B. Cadwell
Seerotary for Women.
9:"30-Church School. Student
<lss lecd by Pr'of. Running.
10:45-Morning Worship. Sermon
on "The Best Seeker."
Classled by Prof.
T r aA cClusky.
;) Sochal Hour and Supper.
: . .Youn gPeople's Society.
BEThLEHEM
EVANiELCA CHURCH
d1gieaI , d of N. A.)
1' m ,i 'vietwon Packard
G. A . c-naau, Ministe r

CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH

Dr. Car) S. Pattoji

:.

9:30-Sunday School.
10:45--"The Homely Virtues."
5:30--Supper and discussion.
"Question Box."
The Student FeFlowship of the
Congregational Church will give a
tea dance in the church parlours
on Tuesday afternon. October 14,
15, and 16- ar^ flt" -irt; s setfor'
'h -inu ho-b of he Fel-
lowship. An- , is urged
to get into Ceo "on withtbl.
studq'nts {t~ ial
oia cent-.
~

---------------

Sidney S. Iohnlls, Minister

(EPS
Divisliin
8:00 a. m
Churc
9:30 -a.
(Harr

October 9, 1927

T. DREW'S
UOP4L) CHUR'1'
'n !thwrine Streets
wI Re -for
ris a tant.
3 ayA ? rlnlty.
.- i' 2omn ilion C
h.)
m.-Holy Communion
is Hall.)

10:45 a. m.--Morning Service.
Surprising Optimism."

"A

Spe cially Tailored Suits
For Fall
Do not be satisfied with an ordinary ready-
made suit. See Corbett's specially made suits,
tailored to his special order by R. & W. and
Adler Collegian. Two pairs of perfect fitting
trousers with each suit. The coats fit exactly
with not a wrinkle anywhere. And they are
priced at only

5:45 p. m:-Candlelight Supper.
6:30 p. m.-Miss Elizabeth Am-a
crine, "The Isles o Shoal9s."
Students welcome upon

9:00 a. m.-Dible Study.

10:00 a. m.-Regular Morning Wor-
ship.
11:00 a m.-German Service.

11: 00 a. m.--Morning, Prayer and
Sermon by the Rev. William
Norman Guthrie, D. D., Rector
of St. -Mark's, New York City.
6:15 p. m.-Student Supper.
Speaker, Dr. Guthrie.

all occasions.

_.

6:30 p. m.-Young People's Hour.

11

4

EAT
HOME
COOKING

HILLEL FOUNDATION

1

Dal 779

61 E. University

ION LUTHERAN CHURCH
Washington St. and Fifth Ave.
-9 : 00 a. m.-Bible Study.
10:30 a.m-Sermoiiln b astor.

CHURCH OP CHRIST
DISCIPLES
Corner Hill and Tappan
11ev. Frederick Cowin

ST. PAUL'S LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Third and West Huron Streets

wow-W tow wwwww

S -

at

$40

- $45 $50

Saturday, Oct. 8, at 8:45 p. m.
Mixer at the.. Masonic Temple,
[S 4th Ave.

C. A. Brauer, Paistor

T Vl 10'dTITA VD

Oct. 9, 1927

ui;lh Tm.nnnf -I

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