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October 07, 1927 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-10-07

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7, 1927

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

. . .... . . ........

TAVAM MI

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LITERARY CLUB HOLDS Ann Arbor's Name Was Chosen In Honor PANHELLENIC PLANS
Of Wives Of City's Founders In 1824i
n~~rennrnnnm Trnu~nIITOI_ ___I IlrI1T A n IIR A

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Michigan Wopen Are Guests At House
Partv In Oolkhaart Huis In Holland

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Fifteen WomenS elected Fromc Those
Who Tried Out; 'resident
Says Material Bood
TO EMPHASIZE LITERATURE
Athena, women's literary society,
held its annual tryouts Tuesday, Oct.
4, 1927. According to Pauline Zoller,
'28 president of Athena, the tryouts
were all of superior ability and it was
with great difficulty that Athena chose
her new girls.
The girls that were chosen are:
Katherine McMurray, '31, Elsie Bli~-
man, '31, Gwendolyn Zoller, '31, Grace
Darling, '31L, Elizabeth Haskell, '31,
Lois Webb, '31, Isabel lBallou, '30, Ol-
lie Backus, '29, Lucile Deluzer, '29,
Miriam Kellon, '31, Dorothy Kirk-
bridge, '31, Dorothy Lyon, '29, Jean'
Currie, '29, Norma Reid, '28, and
Marguerite Cornell, '30.
At the first meeting of the year,
Athena planned a general outline of
the coming year's work. For a num-
her o years Athena has spent a great
deal of its time in debating. This year
she plans to spend more time on lit-
crary work including plays, readings,
and book reviews. However, debating
is not to be excluded from its pro-
gram.
The oflicers of Athena are president,
Pauline Zoller '29Ed; vice president,
Alletta Morton '29; secretary, Mar-
garet Sibly '30; treasurer, Morine
Jones, '28; parliamentarian, Florence
Pollock, '29; oratorical representative,
Katherine Kelly '28Ed.
'HAIA ILL OFFER NEW'
COURSE IN LEADERSHIP
Training schools are being planned
by the W.A.A. this fall, for Girl Scout
leaders and for Camp Counsellors.
Upperclass women will have prefer-
ence over all others in electing the
courses, though- as many groups as
are necessary to accommodate the
number wishing classes, will be or-
ganized.
Arrangements are being made with
the National Headquarters to hold the
courses on the Michigan campus, a fee
of from $2 to $3 tot be charged for
each course,' which will include from'
7 to 10 meetings.
A poster has been placed on the
bulletin board in Barbour gymnasium
and all girls interested in the courses
are asked to sign it, wlyile all mem-
bers of the Girl Scout organization or
affiliated with it in any way, are re-
quested to call Gladys Appelt at 3318.
Any others - who wish additional in-
formation concerning the work to be
taken up, may also call Miss Appelt.
Further notices about the classes
will be printed in the Daily.
AVERAGE NUMBER OF NEW
PLEDGES IS LOW HERE
The average number of pledges for
each sorority at the university of
Michigan is low compared with those
of other coeducational schools in the
middle west. The University of Indiana
averages about 15 girls pledged to
each sororitys Northwestern came
next, averaging slightly over 12 girls.
Michigan's 21 sororities took in on an
average of 11 pledges. At the Univer-
sity of Illinois at Urbana there is an
average of 10 girls to each Greek
letter organization.
As an example of women being the
stronger sex a French journal cites
the proportion of widows to widowers.
Renee Chosenotte, Rheims, France,
became a modern heroine when she

worked railroad switches for five
hours after her father was struck by
a train.

Had it not been for a woman, away ing this arbor more beautiful, and'
back in the early years of the 19th for a time it had been their home.
century, Ann Arbor might have exist- Mrs. Rumsey was wont to sew in this
ed only in fact, and not in name. The arbor, and to wash clothes in a huge
name,, "Ann Arbor," is believed to iron caldiron nearby.
have been chosen in honor of the One day soon after the survey of the
wives of the two founders of the city- town was made, when John Allen was
_1iary Ann Rumsey and Ann 1. Allen. searching for a name, he approached
.Of the two women, only Mary Ann the arbor where Mrs. Rumsey sat and
Rumsey coluld have had a direct part asked her what she called the delight-
in naming the;town, for she was the ful, restful place. "I call it Ann's
only woman there at the time the I Arbor," replied Mrs. Rumsey. "Don't
name was recorded. Ann Allen did you think it .is a good name?"
not appear until several months later. .John Allen, seeing in the name a
The story of the naming of the town way to honor both M"Is. Rumsey and
reads as follows: his wife, imnuediately sought out Rum-,
Some time in the middle of May, sey, and they decided that Ann Arbor
1824, when the leaves were unfolding, was a good name, not only for the
Mary Ann Rumsey was sitting in an grape arbor but for the town. The
arbor of wild grapevines which ran up name was recorded on their plat, and
over a plum I :ee near the bank of thus it appeared on 'May 25 when the
Allen's Creek -just south of Iuron ilat was recorded in Detroit. A copy
street and a hundred feet or more of the plat is now in the Ann Arbor;
west of First street. Both Allen and court house in the office of the regis-
Rumsey had spent same time in mak- trar of deeds.

UARUH RNUMI

At the Pan-Hellenic meeting, held
Tuesday at the Sorosis hbuse it was
decided to have a banquet at the 1
Union, October 31. Miss Margaretj
Widman, '28 will act as chairman for
the affair.-
At the meeting over which Miss i
Margaret Brer '28 presided, a definitel

Last summer at Oolkhaart huis in
Arnhem, Holland, a unique house
party was given. Twenty university
girls were present, half of them Dutch
and the rest Americans, three of
whom attend the University of Michi-
gan. During the five days in which
they lived together, every opportunity
was given them to know each other
and to understand the customs which
were foreign to them.

gate was set r the van-meirtiIeic a1 The house party was given at Oolk-
which will be November 25, under the haart house, a small farmhouse on
chairmanship of Miss EstherRicker, the Rhine river. From the front
'29. A place for the latter event has porch the girls could look out on the
not been definitely settled. .small flower garden, the river, and
The next Pan-Hellenic meeting will beyond this, the flat patches of green
be held; November 8 at the home of which were farms. Houses and trees
oiss Alice Lloyd who will be hostess looked tall because of the level land
for a supper. on which they stood. One could see
far, yet distances did not seem great.
CHII DELTA PHI TO The fields were bordered by ditches
HOLD TRYO UT S BY lin which water was ever flowing'to
the sea and they were peppered by
ORiGINAL PAPERS cows, always black and white.
Every night a huge cloud would
Following a strictly business pro- descend, hanging over them and cover-
gram, Chi Delta Phi held its first i1g all the lowlands. It was a damp
meeting of the year, Wednesday eve- cloud, almost like gain. They were
ming, inUnivtersiyall.Panesaw ere told that it was this cloud which ne-
ning, in University hall. Plans wer cessitated the constant painting of
l d u d~u d~~l U i. C . L i t~I ~ 11.

CITY Y.W.C.fA. H AS
RECORD MONTH IN
PLACEMENT DEPT.
August was a busy and successful
month for Ann Arbor's Y.W.C.A., ac-
cording to a report recently issued
by the organization.
The employment department sup-
plied all of the 53 calls for day work.
and of the 43 applications for perman-
ent positions, 30 were filled. This is
the largest percentage of calls to be
supplied in any one month during the
entire year. Registration showed 45
seeking day work and 69 wished
permanent employment. There were
39 people who were not placed, but
these were looking for positions in of-
fices and department stores.
Besides the work done by the em-
ployment department, the association
took care of 163 transient guests,
some of whom stayed for only one
evening, and some remained for the
limit of two weeks. A mother placed
her two daughters, both students, in
charge of the organization until she
was able to join them and complete
the years plans for them.}
Two charity cases, involving women
without funds, were cared for by the,
association, and lodging and financial
asistance were furnished them. i
NEW YORK-Alice Brady, deprived
of her former leading man, has given
notice that she will quit the cast of
"Denbigh," a Shubert production.
DENVER-A new sport, horseshoes,
has been introduced as a women's
sport and is being received with en-
thusiasm.
NEW YORK-Women smoking has
become so common that a large shoe
store provides ash trays beside each
seat.
........ -- - ....-----e -e - --
YSODA LUNCHES
GOODNESS!
II
CANDIES
TICE's
(Near Arc)
"

Brumm WiIlI Talk
At Theta Sigma Phi
Thci a sigma Phi is to hold its first
meeting of the seasou on Tuesday, Oct.
11, at 7:30. Professor Bruim, head
of the journalistic department will

ia te ana announces c oncernng ryL
outs for membership.
Second semester Freshmen and all
upper classmen are eligible. A com-

speak. The place of meeting has not nmittee of three has been chosen from
been decided on. the club to select the best of the manu-
Theta Sigma Phi is a national wom- scripts which will later be voted on as
an's honorary journalistic fraternity. a whole. In this way, as membership
Until. thee years ago it was known as is really honorary, only the very best
a local society under the name of are chosen.
Theta Sigma. Membership is 'limited Manuscripts are all to be submitted,
to the students of the journalism de- typed, and if prose, are to be five
partment and is based on scholarship pages in length; if poetry, to consist of
and achievement. at least three poems that a fairer
The officers of Theta Sigma Phi are: judgment of the work may be made.
president, Dorothy Morehouse '28; They should be placed in the Chi Delta
vice-president, Glady Allen '29; Secre- Phi box in the gmynasium by Wednes-
tary, Mary Ptolomy '29; treasurer, day, October 26.
Marian Anderson '28. Among the
years activities they are planning a KANSAS CITY-Accepting the ver-
matrix table banquet at which there diet of doctors who have told her that
will be several well known speakers death is near, Mrs. C. C. Craig; former
of the literary world as guests. stage star, has started distribution of
hy w_ as guess. souvenirs of her actress days to her
friends.

their houses, not merely a well-devel-
oped sense of cleanliness.
The Dutch girls were a sociable,
wholesome group, some of them pos-
sessed a keen sense of humor. None
of them used cosmetics of any kind
and when they saw the American girls
going through their customary morn-
ing toilette they said, "Why, they even
use powder!"
One morning the Dutch girls an-
nounced that they were all to motor to
the mountains for the day, so they
bundled into busses and off they
drove. After a couple of hours they
came to a little, wooded pinnacle and
got out to walk. Before long they
reached the top. True, they could
see for miles and miles, but the Ameri-
cans though Dutch "mountains" rath-.
er humorous.
On this same drive they stopped at
the town of Nijmwegen, where were
Roman ruins and an interesting castle
which had belonged to Charlemain.
The Dutch girls regretted very much
that the Americans did not have time
to take a bike hike with them. In
Holland people do not have picnics or
outings as often as we do, but at

least once in a summer they like to
spend a week-end bike riding between
their own home and that of some dis-
tant friend. Since Holland is so small
they have friends everywhere. For
such trips as these all luggage is car-
ried on their backs and food is gotten
along the way.
The Dutch girl who acted as guide
during the house party lived in the
Hague. After their stay at Arnhem
several of the Americans visited her
at home.
Dutch city houses are much like
ours. In almost every Dutch home are
several things from the Dutch East
Indies or from Java. The area of Hol-
land is so small that many of the
young men are sent away from home
to seek their fortunes where there is
greater opportunity, and they return
with all sorts .of; curiosities and trea-
sures. One evening during their stay
at the Hague, the girls were seren-
aded by a man who had just returned
from Java. He had a guitar much like
those used in Hawaii, and he sang
Spanish songs to them. It was all
very romantic, this serenade, and the
several countries it represented.
About a two hours' trolley ride from
the Hague is Schevenginen, or
Strand, as it is translated. This is a
pleasure resort where an American or-
chestra plays every evening during
the summer. The Charleston and the
tango are here the most popular
dunces, and drinks of all kinds are
always in order. And all are not
Americans who go there, by any
means.
Women drivers are becoming more
numerous in Berlin at the rate of 120
per month, even though they must
pass a rigid test.
Co-eds at the University of Texas
will have their own cheer-leaders and
will sit in a section next to the men.
GENEVA - Portugal ratified the
Geneva convntion for the abolition,
of all slaveky.
RAE THEATER
DOUG
FAIRBANKS
In
"THE BLACK PIRATE"

ADVISERS INITIATE
FIRST OF SERIES
OF COLLEGE TEAS
Inaugurating the first of a series of
Thursday afternoon college teas for
University women, the Advisers to
Women, assisted by members of the
Adams house, acted as hostesses to
more than 40 guests from 3:30 to 5
o'clock yesterday in the parlors of
Barbour gymnasium.
Commenting on ithe plan,. Miss
Beatrice Johnson, who is in charge
of the teas, said: "It is an excellent
idea and a good way for Miss Lloyd,
Miss Richards, and myself to meet
the women from the league houses,
with whom we do not have as much
occasion to come inl contact as the
sororities and dormitories."
A similar tea will be held next
Thursday afternoon at which the
members of Andrus house will assist,
Golf Is Best Liked
Of Elective Sports
Golf deserves honorable mention as
the most popular elective sport this
season. Miss McCormick reports
classes totalling 95, while special
groups add about 12 to this number.
Busses leave Barbour gymnasuni for
the University golf course at 2, 3 and
4 o'clock daily. Any. other players,
men as well as women, are privileged
to take the busses. The People's
Motor Bus company is offering this
fine cooperation, which is a result of
the unusual amount of interest which
women are showing in golf this fall.
Attendance at golf classes has bee1n
noticeably regular, and the majority
of players are buying good clubs with
the intention of keeping up the
activity.
The Convent of Ursaline, founded in
1727 at New Orleans, has the honor
of being the oldest girls school in the
United States. It has -just celebrated
its two hundreth anniversary.

r

There will be a meeting of the cap-{
I tains of the Freshman intra-mural
volley-ball teams in the parlors of the
Barbour gymnasium at 4 o'clock, Fri-
day.
The following games are scheduled
for this afternoon; at 4:15 Phi Gam-
.ma Mu vs. Pi Beta Phi; and at 5:15,
Alpha Omicron Pi vs. Kappa Alpha
Theta.
All women who are interested in
the writing of music for the Junior
Girls' play are requested to call Edna
Mower at 9239.

ROME-Premier Mussolini received
a delegation headed by L. Zunini,
Italian consul for Chicago, and was
given a note from Governor Small of
Illinois.

"RELEASING"
New Autumn Novelties

in a great
Demonstration

WEEK-END ROUND TRIP FARES
Between ,
ANN -'ARBOR AND TOLEDO
Tickets on sale Saturday and Sunday of each-week, re-
turning not later than Monday following date of sale.
See Agent for Particulars
ANN ARBOR RAILROAD

Take Him to
THE RAE

of Vogue, Vale

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Brunswick, N. J., high school bar-
red Mrs. Serena Rabke from school
because she was married and would
be a distraction.

mmow

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Fall

Dresses,

New and Smart

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for Fall

A clever one strap de- D5
satin, .also all-over
.patent.
High or medium, heels

Fall Opening Week
Brings Choice New Modes

Whippet Hats-
Fabrics
Satin
Velvet
and
Combinations

U''l

Fall opecing at this store
bring the cream of the new
modes in women's and misses'

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dresses.

Clever Trimmings,
Novelty designs-
Dogs-
Sparkling
brilliants
with red
collars.

DO NOT FORGET
One of the finest Confectionery and Lun h
Rooms in the State=
Our Tasty Refreshments Are Pleasing
We Specialize in Hot Lunches
Try Cur Pure, Home-Made Candies

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Models that are outseanding
examples of the finest values
you can procure anywhere.
A presentation thae ranks
with the best and invites your
close attention tomorrow.

Gunmetal Kid hi-cuts '
a
,gore style-snug fitting;
delightfully different. 7
'High or medium heels

Black, the
most popular
shade for
Fall and Winter,
and it harmonizes
well with most

others--

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evety costume.

Suede combinations, _
Lustrous satins,
Reptilian Leathers

11

75 Styles

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Price:
$5.00 and $7.50
(Second Floor)

$4.55 to $8.50

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