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October 07, 1927 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-10-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIG"N DAILY

E[LLOWSHIPS GRANTED
DY GRADUATE SCHOOL
Thirteen Awards Given by Business
Coneerns Receive Sanction of 1
Board of Regents
EFFECTIVE FOR 1927-28
At a recent meeting of the executive
board of the Graduate school a list of
fellowships was approved ' and has
subsequently received the sanction of
the Board of Regents.
Under a fellowship offered by the
Parke, Davis Co., of Detroit, Franklin
D. Smith receives $500; from the fel-
lowship donated by Frederick Stearns
and Co., Detroit, Edward S. Blake re-
ceives $500.
The Detroit Edison Co., gives a fel-
lowship ini metallurgy under which
Claude L. Clark receives $1250, and
one in Chemical engineering under
which Everett P. Partridge receives
$1250.
Arthur M. Wagner receives a fellow-
ship of $750 from Berry Bros., De-
troit;- froin the National Gasoline
Manufacturers' Association, Emroy
M. Skinner receives $1,000, Edwin A.
Clark receives $750, Hal B. Coats re-
ceives $750, and Jarvis E. Miller re-
ceives $750.
Under the fellowships offered by
Edwin C.' Hiisdale, Adolph Murie,
Olive C. St ull and Josselyn Van
Tyne each receives:$60.0, and Theo-
dore H. Hobbell receives $140 to sup-
plement a fellowship already granted.
All of the fellowships approved on
this list are" effective for the school
year 1927-1928.
"Lumberien Qair
Belief In Forester,"
Says George Duthe
Superintendent of Black Hills Reserve
Tells Club of Fire Prevention
Measures In Use

1

Michelson At Work
Testing Light Speed

STUDENT AGENCIES CONTINUED
BY YALE EMPLOYMENT BUREAU
The Bureau of Appointments at Yale and leaves the rust for the few remain-
University is again carrying on a ing jobs and other activities.
worthwhile business this year, in their Managership of the various depart-
student-agencies which are directly monts is held 0y seniors who arc Zro-
supervised and aided by the Bureau. moted o account of dexterity, Ulbility,
By this means, self-supporting stu- - - - -
dents have a chance to get employ-
ment in fields for which they are par-
ticularly suited and prepared.
A wide field is covered by the var- r

reporters of

I

. .C. 1.. .tili V G X11

ious agencies which come under the
Bureau. That it pays was shown last;
year when over 300 students earned
more than $34,000 through the means
of the agencies.
All of the agencies have central of--
fices in the same location near the
campus. Among the various business
fields are a laundry agency, ticket
agency, newspaper and magazine
agency, travel bureau, typewriting and
mimeographing agency, and many
others in a wide field to supply the
needs of the Yale students.
One of the most enterprising is an
agency for distributing bils and ad-
vertisemenits, and running errands.
Most of the work in this branch is
done during the first part of the month

46Tf

&3

A

Dr. Albert A. Michelson.
Chicago university scientist and the
first American to be awarded the
Noble prize in physics (more than 20
years ago), is completing lifelong ex-
periments in Pasadena, Cal., on the
speed of light and to test the so-called
"ether drift" element of the relativity
theory as advanced by Einstein.

hone 6

4

AERONAUTICAL CLASSES
INCREASE ENROLLMENT
Professor Felix W. Pawlowski, of
the Aeronautical Engineering depart-
ment, announces an increase of the
number of students enrolled in his
department. There are now 140 stu-
dents in the department as compared
to the 80 pf last year.
"It is very gratifying to me to ex-
perience such an increase in this
course," said Prof. Pawlowski, "but
I am hardly able to explain it. It is
a matter of conjecture for the most
part. It may have something to do
with a new aeronautical boom. It
may mean the birth of a new year in
the American aeronautical industry.
Again, it might indicate that the Aero-
nautical industry of the United States
is to develop in Michigan. It is impos-
sibIe to tell how long it will last, but
it is a welcome development."
7000 MILE TRIP
PLANNED BY FLIER
Dieudonne Coste.
Famous French aviator, hopes to
make a successul four-stage flight
from Paris to Buenos Aires, a distance
of 7,000 miles.

"Lumbermen are beginning to be-
lieve in forestry," George Duthe, '08,
superintendent of the Black Hills Na-
tional Forest declared in a talk before
the forestry club Wednesday. "When
the forester can show the lumberman
how to handle land on a reforestra-
tion basis, the lumberman will invest
in a trained forester."
Duthe, who was one time president
of the forestry club, told of his log-
ging experiences near Rapid City in
the district where President Coolidge,
spent the summer. The Black Hills
forest was the first ,forest in which
regulated cutting was done, Duthe
said. The system of controlling the
amount of wood cut was started in
1898.
Speaking of forest protection, Mr.
Duthe said that the Black Hills has a
high fire hazard with about a hundred
fires a year caused by both lightning
and incendiary reasons. The loss and
the number of fires is decreasing
steadily however, he stated. Four
look-out stations are maintained in the
district.
Prof. Donald M. Mathews of the
forestry school also gave a talk on his
experiences in the tropics. He told of
organizing a forestry school in the
Philippines to train the natives to
carry on the forestry work. When
he was first sent to the Philippines,
Mathews had to explore the island to
find out what trees grew there.
The governor of North Borneo in-
vited Mathews to Borneo as chief
forester for the British government in
the colony. Mathews told of amusing
incidents on the islands and how he
had a hand in keeping a Japanese
rubber company from purchasing
much land for, commercial purposes.
STUDENTS WILL INSPECT
SAGINAWFOST TODAY

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- .Hill

SSeattle.arTn

and
Ann Arbor's Finest Dance Music since the J-Hop
EDDIE NIEBAUR'S

INTERFRATIRNITY COUNCIL
All general fraternities are re
quested to send representatives
to a meeting of the Interfratern-
ity council at 4:30 o'clock Mon-
day in room 302 of the Union.
This is the second meeting of
the council this year, the first
having been held last Tuesday at
which time officers were elected.

..

ARMOR Y

Cor. E. Ann and Fifth Ave.

A VICTOR RECORDING ORCHESTRA

Fri., Oct. 7 Only

Ii

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Ticket 8at Grahams

WAS HINGTON - For the second
consecutive week the public health
service noted a slight decrease in the
number of infantile paralysis cases.

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Plans have been made by the l
Forestry club to take underclassmen
on an inspection tour of aginaw
forest today. A campfire will be held
at the forestry experimentation farm
and a chance given for all new men to
done in the woods. Trucks will leave
the east entrance of Natural Science
building at 4 o'clock to transport the
men to the farm. All arrangements
are in charge of R. E. McArdle, who'
has planned a 'brief program. A
number of the upperclassmen are to
make the trip also.

i

1111111111111111111111111llll1111t1111,
TAMS, $1.50
/hen: Saturday
Where: Jacobson's
What: Felt and Corduroy
in all Colors
TAMS TAMS
$1.50 $1.50
Why you will want one:
Because Paris'says
'Berets pour le sport.'
r7 I

=1
F!

Reopening of the Famous Parisian School of Dances
lIE. CALLIOPE CIIARISSI, Directress
A pleasure while learning to dance in Ann Arbor's most i pormnt school of dancing. Modern dancing.

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