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October 05, 1927 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-10-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER .1

rW . DN uE. 111;1 LtIElui¢YR Y

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AND

PIRATE'S

OPEN WORLD SERIES'

i

TODAY

UMPIRES CHOSEN cmke-cnooooooeoeeenxwere
PENINOCK, NEWYOR FO TITLE SERIES R BATTLE FAILK ALONG THE SIDELINES
SOUTHPAW' INJURED To AR'OIISF fR IMRON Coach Tad Wiemnan sent his entire yeserdiy, Coach kipke look he

4

Sports Critic Calls
Wolverine Second
Gopher Win 'Break''IN INFORMAL MEE

.
G

i I I %0 111 1 vVV86. W'ias III VVItI

Nalliti and 0Oritisby
American league umpires, who have
been chosen as the arbiters to repreo
sent the junior circuit in the world's
series beginning at Forbes field, Pitts-
burgh, today. Nallin and Red Ormsby
are veterans at the art of calling
strikes and balls, having had many
years experience.
DETROIT PLAYERS
GAIN TWO TITLES
(I'y Associated Press)
DETROIT, Oct. 4.-When George
Moriarty ceased to be an umpire and1
became manager of the Detroit Tigers
he said something about making the
Tigers a base stealing team. At the
close of the American league season
Sunday the Detroit club had run away
with 138 bases, one more than Wash-
ington, the second team in the league
in this sport.
And this despite the fact that the
speedy pair, Jackie Tavener and
Johnny Neun, shortstop and first
baseman, respectively ,were out of
the game for long periods with in-
juries.
In addition to this distinction the
Tigers showed an infield that execut-
ed 170 double plays, one more than
the St. Louis Cardinals for the major
league championship in their division.
Detroit placed two men-one the lead-
er, Heilmann, and the other, Fother-
gill-among the major lea-ue's first
five batters.
BOILERMAKER STAN HURT
IN SATURDAY'S CONTEST
(By Associated Press)
LAFAYETTE, Ind., Oct. 4.-Cotton
Wilcox, offensive star of the Purdue
university football team for two years,
will be unable to play for an indefinite
period due to an ankle injury re-
ceived in the Depauw game Saturday.
An X-ray revealed a chipped bone
which was removed by an operation.y
As Purdue's offensive is built
around Wilcox's flashy ball carrying,
it is believed his loss will be a serious
handicap in the game with Harvard
next Saturday.
At
Michigan

IUdergraiduates Fail to Understand
lhuit Aluinti M eai n by. Playing
Princcton Team
PYLE PROMOTES CONTEST
(By Associated Press)
CAMIBRIDGE, Mass., Oct. 5.--An-
nouncement of plans for a football
game in New York City between
alumni of Ilarvard and Princeton
whose traditional undergraduate ath-
letic relationships were severed last
year, evoked little' enthusiasm here
today.-
With the exception of Al Miller,
speedy halfback for the last three
Harvard teams, prominent former
players saw little to be gained by the
projected game.
Even Miller qualified his-announced
readiness to play by stipulating that
he would only consider donning his
togs again if he were assured that
his amateur status would not be en-
dangered.
Miller, in disclosing that he had
been approached by C. C. Pyle, the
professional football promoter who
has offered to turn over the Yankee
stadium for the game on Oct. 30, said
Pyle had spoken of a financial com-
pensation.
Advices actively interested in the
idea emphasized that the game was
purely for the sport of the thing and
might act as an opening wedge to
restore good relations between the
two universities.
The Harvard Crimson, undergrad-
uate daily, took today another view
saying in reference to such a game:
"It will do nothing toward buryinfi
the hatchet between Princeton and
Harvard.
"Neither college is interested in the
affair, neither undegraduate body sees
it in the light of an intercollegiate
contest. It is a prviate matter con-
cerning only the possible players and
promoters."
YEARLING NETMEN
TO HOLD TOURNEY
Freshman and first year on campus
tennis players will have their last
chance to register for the fall elimina-
tion tournament tomorrow afternoon.
The tournament will start Thursday
afternoon, and only those who have
registered with John Marshall before
tomorrow night will be entered.
The eight players who reach the
quarter finals of the tournament will
play matches with the Varsity and
last year's Freshman team during the
fall season. The Varsity, with most
of last year's men back, is conceded
a good chance for its second succ.es-
sive Conference championship. Cap-
tain Barton, Moore, and Schaefer, all
letter winners, should form a strong
nucleus for the 1928 team.

squad, recently clipped to 41 members
by the freshly honed pruning shears~
back to the old blocking and tackling
drill for which the Michigan coaching
system is so noted. This is a depart-
ment of work from which the Wol
verines will not be exempt until the
season is ended.
To tlG Coaclis, bhlking and
tackling are t a football what hit-
ting and fielding are to baseball.
As Coach Wieian puts it, c en
the passing gaiae is 8J.1th block-
ngHe plces b ljoekig as .10-
11th of tlhe running' and.i-4tt of
the puntinig.. nue. 't'hese, of
course, are generalities.
The freshman "pony" backs were
again brought over to assist the Var
sity yesterday. They played th
dummy role against some 18 linemen
whom the coaches felt lacking of tack
ling practice. The freshmen were fas
and more than interesting-so wer
some of the larger linemhen.
With Harrigan and Grinnell the
pair at th starting end of the
tackling line and, Baer and Palu -
erol" at the other eud,, the out-
loQk was not so promising for the
yearlings.
Frank Harrigan, incidentally, is
with little doubt the most improved
player on the squad over a year ago
With his speed, weight, and shiftiness
the Grand Rapids kbasketljall star,
converted from back to end to tackl
seems to have found his position at
last. Yesterday, he tackled hard and
sure and looked generally good other-
wise.
Other freshman backs were pro-
cured to exercise the Varsity
backs, but their work was of a
different nature. They played as
no more than dummies to be taken
out of the play by a fast charging
backield blocker clearing the way
for the ball carr~ier..
While Gilbert may be mainly known
for his offensive play, he has other de-
partments in which he is most profi
cient. Blocking-is one of them-when
he blocks an opponent, said opponent
stays blocked!
Blocking by the backs and clearing
the way for the man running with th
ball appeared to be rather weak in
general against Wesleyan Saturday
only occasionally flashes of good form
being shown by the interference. Yes
terday's workout should do much to-
ward smoothing out this part of th(
Wolverine offense.
Since there was a rather strong
breeze sweeping across Ferry field

OPpo!,fjj;t\' i t(rtfloign the kicker,:
pit illiu into tip.* ili 1. ]ril)
Tay io lor and ilhert receive4d Imo4st
of the '10te'itioll.

Walter Eckersall, whose fame as a
sports expert hardly falls short of his
renown as an all-American quarter-

But the best sight of all was the
- appearance of familiar faces which
I have recently been undergoing an in-
forced absence because of injures..
The hospital list is on the downhill
road anl promises to disappear com-
pletely within a short time.
'Normian Gabel worked all by
libiself trying out IMis lender
nmebcrs but had his football na-
fo-1'1r on and looked geod. 311ller,
wiho has been limbering up for
ral days, was in uniform and
mliiost reatly for rongh work.
e Hoffan, although playing Satur-
-lay, rened sweat clothes Monday
e because of his leg infection, but was
back in uniform again. Greenwald,
t whose leg injury has healed, donned
the moleskins for the first tiue in two
e weeks or more, though he has been
working in sweat clothes for three or
four days.
BichI, iSah slight stiffness till
bothering him, «in:s on the field,
but only in track sweat clothes.
]leston was attired likewise and is
nearly in slipe though favoring
his "gane" leg considerably.
rest and most surprisingly of all
Bill Puckelwartz reported a much im
proved left hand and was allowed to
have a workout a la Rich and Heston.
Ptick says .it won't be long now,' as
t he is feeling Just like a cooped up
- Wolverine and wants to get out and
fight-at least by the time Michigan
meets the Badgers.
Boxard, his knee stiUj tightly
bandaged, is moving about with,
more assurance and may be al-
lowed to den a uttiform in a fewa
dlays, 1haugh lie probably will not
play for some time.
13OWL1N( LEAGUE NOTICE
All fraternities wishing to enter
teams in the Fraternity Bowling
league at the Michigan Recreation al-
leys in the Michigan 'Theater building
t will please send in the name of the
organization and the men who will be
on their teams on or before Oct. 15.
i Entries may be made by writing the
e "Michigan Recreation Bowling Al-
I leys" or by phoning 3730.
I. A. (dRAIRDEN.
-

back about
ascribes in

a score of years ago,
this week's Liberty the

second 1926 Wolverine victory over
Minnesota to a badly outplayed team
taking advantage of a single break.
In the final analysis it must be ad-
mitted that every branch of the grid
pastime with the possible exception of,
the forward pass may be classified as
either "leg drive" or "brains" as ex-
ports of even Eckersall's renown
agree.
Now what is commonly called a
"break" is no more than a turning
point in the game, but is a part of the
game, not an external force causing
the turning point.
When Oosterbaan recovered the
poor center pass from McKinnon to
Nylahl in the final quarter and raced,
ahead of the latter and others to a
touchdown, it was not the first play
of the kind in a crucial contest. In
fact, recognizing the possibility,
even the probability of such a fumble
on the part of the Gopher squad,
'Coach Yost of the Wolverines drilIe(l
his charges at length in daring to
scoop up, not fall upon a loose ball'
during the last Michigan workout be-
Lore making the trip to Minneapolis.
With the recent rulings which now
greatly eliminate the free ball, and
with the advent of Coach Wieman,
Michigan now resorts to the safer tac-
tics widely employed at Harvard, Yale,a
and the East in general with the ex-
ception of the Tigers under Roper,
who resemble the Wolverines in ac-
tion.
3ut the extreme cold and snow fore-
cast by weather authorities and the
(Continued on Page Nine.)

Sainson And iaki ns iin Two Events
As lInehigiiles hose Meet
By 40-29 Score
RELAY RACE IS CLOSE
Varsity swimmers. won a hard earn-
ed victory over the ineligibles in the
first practice meet of the season held
in the Union pool this week, The final
score of the meet was 40-29 in favor
of the Varsity.
In the 200 yard relay the ineligibles
won by a narrow margin when Buck
Samson, anchor man, touched out
Capt. Bob Darnall of the Varsity.
Walker, Reif, and Hawkins were the
other members of the winning team.
Hughes of the Varsity won the 200
yard breast stroke by outdistancing
Thompson and Halsted. The 150 yard
back stroke was annexed by Spindle
of the Varsity, who was closely fol-
lowed by his teammate, Hubbell. Boldt
of the ineligibles placed . third
D~arnall beat Samson by inches in
the 50 yard free style: Walker of the
in eligibles took third place. In the
100 yard free style Johnny Hawkins,
former Princeton star, led a fast field
to the finish, Darnall of the Varsity
was second, while Seagar finished
third.
Ault of the Varsity was leading
Samson over a greater part of the dis-
tance in the 400 yard swim, but he
weakened towards the finish, allow-
ing giant ex-captain to pass and beat
him by more than 10 yards. Gold-
smith of the ineligibles sprang a sui.
prise when he took third place from
Watson by a matter of inches.

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