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October 02, 1927 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-10-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1927.

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

ARMY BEATS UNIVERSITY OF DETROIT IN CLOSE

GAME

LONG PASS RESULTS
IN ONLY TOUCHDOWN
Quarters Are Linited To 11 linites
During Second Half Due
0 To Intense heat.
OKLAHOMA DOWNS CHICAGO
(By Assocatd Press)
WEST POINT, N. Y., Oct. 1.-One
long pass, Cagel to Born, in the first
quarter against a substitute team,
gave the Army a 6 to 0 victory over
the University of Detroit football team
here today.
Coach Dorais started his second squad
with the strategic purpose of hurling
in his regulars at an opportune mo-
ment. The move failed. After an early
exchange of punts Army had the ball
on the Titan's 47-yard line. After Cagel
was stopped for no gain, he passed
over the line to Born who dropped for
what proved to be the only score of
the game. Wilson missed the attempt
for goal.
iBoth Teams Fumble.
Fumbles were frequent by both
teams. The third and fourth quarters
were limited to 11 minutes each be-
cause of the intense heat.
Detroit, on a series of line bucks
and an Army penalty, advanced to the
Cadets' 10-yard line early in the sec-
ond quarter, but lost the ball on
downs. Both sides turned to punting
when the heat began to take its toll,
and substitutions were frequent.
Grier Misses Goal.
Grier, sent into the Army backfield
to attempt a field goal, missed and
Brazil punted out of danger as the half
ended. Again in the third quarter, .De-
troit threatened when a pass, Maloney
to Phelan, took the ball to the Army's
8-yard line. The Cadets' regular squad,
which had been resting, was rushed in
to halt the advance. Connell made two
(yards off tackle and the Titan's last
chance for a score was lost.
In the fourth quarter Dorais' men
unleashed a passing attack which net-
ted gains of 40 yards andl 35 yards,
but the Army defense broke up the ad-
vance by intercepting a pass.
CHICAGO, Oct. 1.-With five min-
utes to go and Chicago leading 7 to 0,
Haskins of Oklahoma passed twice,
each throw resulting in a touchdown
and the Sooners defeated Chicago by a
13 to 7 score here today. Chicago's
lead, acquired in the second period
when Mendenhall, playing his first!
game of college football, passed,
kicked and bucked for a touchdown,
was never threatened until late in the
final period.
PHILADELPHIA, Oct. 1.-In mid-
summer heat the University of Penn-
sylvania crushed the Swarthmore col-
lege football team on Franklin field
today, 33 to 0. About 40,000 persons
perspired in the heat and watched the
game.
Pennsylvania ran' over Swarthmore
in the first period for a score of 20 to
0, but did not score again until the
last period when two more touch-
downs were made. the first three
touchdowns came i 11t minutes.
Instead of adhering to the hidden-
ball entirely, Pennsylvania opened
wide her attackls and made consider-
able headway through the air.
CAMBRIDGE-Gardner Lewis, Har-
vard end, broke his leg in scrimmage
for the first serious Harvard injury of
the season.
ATLANTA-Bobby Jones, Atlanta
golfer, has entered his second year in
the law school of Emory university.

Heilrann Is Close
To Leader In Race
For Batting Honors
(By Associated Press)
CHICAGO, Oct. 1.-While Paul Wan-
er, the hard hitting Pittsburgh out-
fielder has sewed up the National
league individual batting champion-
ship for 1927, a meryy contest, with
the winners still in doubt is waging
in the American circuit between A
Simmons of Philadelphia and Harry
Heilmann of Detroit, the off again
on again champion.
Simmons Tops League.
Including games of September 28
unofficial averages show that these
two players are separated by the nar.
row margin of one point, Simmons
leading with .390. The slugging Tiger
outfielder, however, apparently seems
destined to win the honor which he
has held every other year since 1921
because of his spectacular spurt with
the willow. Last week Heilmann was
four points behind Simmon, who is
making a great effort to gain the
batting championship of the junior,
circuit.
Pushed by the stress t,? Pittsburgh's
pennant ride, Waner a 20 point:;
ahead of his nearest rival, Rogers
Hornsby of New York. Waner's aver-
age including games of September 28
was .382. Hornsby's 'was .3e. ,
The Ten Leaders.
American league: Simmons, Phil-
adelphia; .390; Heilmann, Detroit
.389; Gehrig, New York, .372; Fother-
gill, Detroit, .361; Cobb, Philadelphia
.357; Combs, New York, .356; Ruth,
New York, .352; Goslin, Washingt .i
.337; Meusel, New York, .329; Coch-
rane, Philadelphia, .329.
National league: Waner, Pitts-
burgh, .382; Hornsby, New York.
.362; L. Waner, Pittsburgh, .351;
Stephenson, Chicago, .342; Traynor
I ittsburgh, .351; Stephenson, Chicao,
.342; Traynor, Pittsburgh, .3 3 9 ;
Frisch, St. Louis, .336; Harris, Pitts-
burgh, .330; Hafey, St. Louis, .328;
Uarper, New York, .326; Terry, New
York, .324.
Yankees First at Bat.
The New York Yankees, Americar
league champions, have also won the
championship for team batting with a
precentage of .306, leading the Ath-!
letics by four points. The Pirates led
the National league in team attim,
averages to date by the same per-
centage, being nine points ahead of
the Giants.
Waite Hoyt of the Yankees appar-
ently has turned in the best pitching
performances of the American circuit. !
winning 22 games and losing seven for
a percentage of .759, The National
league pitching championship is -some-
what in doubt. Jess Haines of the St.?
Louis Cardinals, Larry Benton, of
New York, Grimes of New York,
Kremer of Pittsburgh, are having a
close duel for top percentage honors.
IHaines is now leading with a mark of
.697. Frankhouse, sensational Card-

GAME

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G HESIDELINE EIHTS REA BDS
Rain is rain, but king football bows
to none. With less rain than that
which fell yesterday, many fields
would have been muddy and sloppy- Opening with a five run attack in
but not the new Wolverine stadium the first inniig, Pittsburgh hammered
ield. out a 9-6 victory over Cincinnati yes-
Whatever doubts may have been terday, thus assuring the Pirates of
entertained as to the drainage and the pennant. The Corsairs will thus
sodding of the new gridiron were meet the Yankees in the battle for the
completely dispelledin yester- world'schampionship this week. Ray
day's game. Water is Oi the remer was found for 16 hits by the
field in places at the kickoff and Reds, but his teammates came to his
the inen skidded when down oil aid with the bludgeon to cinch the Na-
the grass, but the footing was. re. tional league bunting.
markahly good. Blabe Ruth failed to add his sixty-
first home run to his total, but never-
Though the Michigan team showed theless the Yankees scored their 110th
to good advantage, penalties marred victory of the season at the expense of
play more throughout the entire game Washington. Wiley Moore was credited
than in nearly any game the Wol- with the New York win, holding the
verines have played in the last few Senators to seven hits.
years. This was almost the only real The Giants pulled up within a game
raggedness shown, however. of the second place Cardinals by de-
# ' feating Brooklyn 6-1, while St. Louis
Listed aiong the Wolverine was idle on account-of rain.
penal tids which ran nearly to 101 Standing of the National league
yards were two of 15 yards each leaders:
and( Oie of 20. -Wesleyan's pen- Won Lost Pet.
alties ran well over 50 yards. Pittsburgh ..........94 59 .614
St. Louis............91 61 .599
Baer, converted from left tackle to New York ..........91 62 .596
eight guard, fitted into his new post
like he had always been stationed Washington and Jefferson
there. He was down under punts Oct. 8-Bethany at Washington.
'irst. practically every time and so Oct. 15-Carnegie Tech at Forbes
,trengthened the right side of the line field.
that most of the off tackle plays went Oct. 22--Lafayette at Easton.
on his side of the line. Oct. 29.-Thiel College at Washing-
ton.
Ohio Wesleyan brought up its Nov. 5-Pittsburgh at Pittsburgh.
full band' of 42 pieces including Nov. 12-Bucknell at Lewisburg.
the driu major. Michigan's band Nov. 24-West Virginia at Morgan-
could not brag so mnich, however. town.
Of the 67 men included on the
Wolerine organization, two of NEW YORK-All reserved seats at
the snare drumers were apparent- the Yankee Stadium for the world
ly afraid of. the rain and aided series have been sold.
greatly i! detracting from its
appearance.
Even Gordon Packer, drum major
extraordinary, faltered once. After
a perfect pass over the cross bar on
his first attempt, he "fumbled badly"
but managed to recover his baton
in time to save himself from being
tramped on.IN
In direct contrast to the Illi-
nois-1ichig'an galle in the rain
two years ago when both teams
went through without a substitu- 1111
ltion, the Wolverines alone used
26 mien yesterday before the final a#
whistle. i 'h critics jrou nce it

_... , ""6

14RRY'e
AEi LMA t4N*S SSG
Z3AT PRoVeD To
Be A B1G-MELP To

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TM~ TIGER.S
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As the baseball season draws t , a close, the scribes are turning to the task of selecting the most valuable
player in both the American and National leagues. Above are shown some of the leading contenders for thle
prized trophy. Recipients of the title in the American league in former years have been George Sisler, St.
Louis, in 1922; Babe Ruth, New York, in 1923; Walter Johnson, Washington, in 1924; Roger Peckihpaugh,
Washington in 1925; and George Burns, Cleveland, in 1926. Winners of the trophy in the National league were
Dazy Vance, Brooklyn, in 1924;1 og rs Hornsby, St. Louis, in 1925; and Bob O'Farrell, St. Louis, in 1926.

inal rookie has yet to be defeated, in-I
cluding games of September 28. He
has emerged victorious in five game.
Ten Leading IItchierv.
National league: Haines, St. Louis
.697; Benton, New York, ..696; Grimes.
New York, .692; Kremer, Pittsburg
.692; Meadows, Pittsburgh, .679; Alex-
ander, St. Louis, .677; Hill, Pitts-
burgh, .676;Henry, New York, .647;
Root, Chicago, .634; Fitzsimmons,
New York, .630. Because or vrar_;-
house's late arrival in the league -
remarkable average in not conmiqered
in the pereentage I eadersn .,
Hoyt Has is11gh Average.
American league: Hoyt, New York.
.759; Shocker, New York, .739;
Moore, New York, .708; Hadley, Wash-
ington, .700; Lisenbee, Washingtoni,
692; Pennock, New York, .692; Rueth-
er, New York, .684; Grove, Philadel-
phia, .625; Lyons, Chicago, .600; and

_____ __

11udlin, Cleveland, .586.
In the National league Philadelphia
and Cincinnati are tied for the team.
fielding average prize, each having a
percentage of .973. The Cubs are
third with .972. In the Americand
League Chicago and Philadelphia
are also tied in that department with S
an average of .971.
Brown
Oct. 8-Pennsylvania at Philadel-
phia.
Oct. 15--Yale at New Haven.
Oct. 22-Lebannon Valley at Provi-
dence.
Oct. 29-Temple at Providence.
Nov. 5-Dartmouth at Providence.
Nov. 12-arvard at Cambridgo.
Nov. 19-New Hampshire at Provi-
dence.
Nov. 24-Colgate at Providence.

Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
p1]ia.

Cornell
8-Richmond at Ithaca.
22-Princeton at Ithaca.
29-Columbia at Ithaca.
5-St. Bonaventure at Ithaca.
12--sDartmouth at Hanover.
24-Pennsylvania at Philadel-j

Pittsburgh
Oct. 8-West Virginia at Pittsburgh.
Oct. 15-Drake at DesMoines.
Oct. 22-Carnegie at Pittsburgh.
Oct. 29-Allegheny at Pittsburgh.
Nov. 5-Washington and Jefferson
at Pittsburgh.
Nov. 12-Nebraska at Pittsburgh.
Nov. 24--Penn State at Pittsburgh.

MINEAPOLIS-The i n t r a m i r.
prize for the leading fraternity
sports at Minnesota this year is
bronze gopher two feet high.

9' 1
in
a

bronze gopher two feet high.

I

76

.-

FALL TENNIS TRYOUTS
All freshmen or first year men
wishing to enter the fall tryouts
for the tennis team are asked to re-
port to John Marshall at the Ferry
field courts between 2:00 and 4:00
o'clock next Monday afternoon.

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Regulation Gym OXufits
Gym Sults, 'Sweat Shirts, Shoes
Supporters, Socks
NOTE-O dso'rddt
on all Tenniis Rackets
'711 North Unsiversity Ave. Next to Arcade Theater

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V*K*

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University Styles
Customized by Hickey-Frem;^an

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A phrase particularly significant to
you. The knowledge and skill of this
remarkable organization directed to
the making of clothes specially for
our university trade.

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$52-$65

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