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October 02, 1927 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1927-10-02

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY __

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
AMember .of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
fttiled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paperand the iocal news pub-
lished herein.
Entered at the postoflce at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Suscription by carrier, $4,oo; by mail,
$4.s.
offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street. -
Phones: Editorial, 4925; usiness 21a4.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
JO H. CHAMBERLIN
Editor............. .....Ellis P. Merry
Staff Editor...............Philip C. Brooks
City Editor..............Courtland C. Smith
Editor Michigan Weekly.,Charles E. Behymer
Women's1ditr..........Marian L. Welles
Sports Editor............Herbert E. Veder
Theater, Books and Music.Vincent C. Wall, Jr.
Telegraph Editor.............Ro 's W. Ross
Assistant City Editor.....ichard C. Kurvink
Night Editors
Robert E. inch G. Thomas McKean
J. Stewart Hooker Kenneth G. Patrick
Paul J. Kern Nelson J. Smith, Jr.
Milton Kirshbaum
Reporters
Margaret Arthur Charles R. Kaufman
Alexander 'N. .Donald J. Kline
A3ecxnowski Sally Knox
Emmons A. Bonfield jack L. Lait Jr.
Stratton Buck Richard H. Milroy
Jean Campbell Charles S. Monroe
Jessie Church Catherine Price
Sydney M. Cowan Mary E. Ptolemy
William 1,IDavis Harold L. Passman
William C. Davis. Morris W. Quinn
Mason deI la Vergne Pierce Rosenberg
Orville L.. Dower D avid Scheyer
Clarence N. Edelson Robert (. Silbar
Margaret Gros Howard F. Simon
ldith V. Eg~and George E. Sinons
Marjorie Follier Alfred L. Singer
James B. Freeman Sylvia Stone
Robert J. Gessner George Tilley
Milton L. Goldstein Edward L. Warner, Jr.
Elaine E. Gruber Leo j. Yoedicke
Joseph ;. Howell Joseph Zwerdling
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
WILLIAM C. PUSCH
Assistant Manager.... George H. Annable, Jr.
Advertising ..............Mchard A. Meyer
Advertising ...............Arthur M. Hinkley
Advertising...............Edward L. Hulse
Advertising............John W. Ruswinckel
Accounts................Raymond Wachter
Circulation.............George B. Ah, Jr.
Publication.................Harvey Talcott
Assistants
Fred ,Babcock' Ray IHolelich
George Brade~r y Marsden R. Hubbard
James . Brwn Hal A. Jaehn
JamesB. Co pe James Jordan
Charles K. ( orrell Marion Kerr
Bessie U. Egeland , Thales N. Len ington
Ben Fishman W. A. Mahaffy.
Katherine Frochne George M. Perrett
.Douglass Fuller Alex K. Scherer
Herbert Goldterg William L. Schloss
L. . Goodn Herbert E. Varnum
Carl W. Halni'
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1927.
Night Editor-MILTON KIRSHBAUM
FRAT1E#ITY PRESIDENTS
Representatives of the fraternities
in the campus will meet Tuesday
afternoon in the Union in the first
meeting of the Interfraternity coun-
cil for the iportant business of elect-
ing officers,
Upon choice of the council's offi-
cials will depend much of the effec-
tiveness of the body, which has been
none too great in recent years. With
farsighted, energetic, and intelligent
leaders, the Interfraternity council
should be able to abandon its almost
admitted lethargy for the exertion of
the worthwhile influence which simi-
lar bodies wield elsewhere.
To even greater extent, the entirely
possible success of .the council will
depend upon the calibre of the fra-
ternity representatives. The sugges-
tion advocated by Dean Bursley that
the president of the house and one
junior attend the council meetings is
a very notable one.
At the fraternity meetings which

will be generally held tomorrow night,'
the head of each house wNl do well to
designate himself or, if impossible for
him to attend, some other capable
and preferably well-known senior, and
one junior as the official delegates to
the Interfraternity council.
STABILITY
With an estimated revenue of P0,-
000,000,000 francs and a total expen-
diture estimated at 42,000,000,000
francs for the year 1928, the condition
of the French treasury promises to be
the best since the war; and the
French government promises for the
first time since 1914 to show a sub-
stantial operating profit.
The inevitable results of this fa-
vorable condition can not help but be
tremendously advantageous to Eur-
ope and the whole world. It means
that France from now on will be-
come a solvent nation again; and as
long as nothing occurs to upset that
equilibrium she should remain sol--
vent indefinitely.
This means that the French franc
will become truly stabilized; that
France may wipe out her unfavorable
trade balance; and that France may
finaly be able to commence repay-
ment of her war obligations. It
means, also that France has passed
through one of the most trying pe-

ence on te ,whole economic situation
of the world.
With her internal money affairs
nearing a normal basis, France should
be ready to tackle the international
aspects of her financial problems, of
which the principal ones involve the
war debts. To be sure, the latter
may cause the difficulty, discussion,
and perhaps ill-will which they havet
already occasioned particularly witht
the United States. Yet, some settle-
ment must be reached, and. whatever
be the result, it seems probably thatt
negotiations will soon be initiated to
take up the second stage of French,
financial recovery as outlined by M.
Poincare a year ago.
TO AVOID UCTERTAINTIES
To make members of the statet
legislature at Lansing see things lin
the light of the officials of many edu-
cational institutions "from Maine to
California" is the great task Presi-
dent Clarence Cook Little has set for
himself since he took over the reins att
Michigan. His address over the radio
Friday night was another step toward
that goal.I
President Little has brought all the
pressure possible to bear on this
phase of meeting the needs of the
University of Michigan. Last year het
made a special trip to Lansing in or-1
der to put his views before the legisla-
ture. As a result, the University un-
questionably received a larger appro-
priation than otherwise would have
been the case.
The problem was far from satis-
factory, yet, however. As had been -
the case before, the matter was not
cleared up until the final sessions oft
the legislature. That weakness of the
method now in vogue is one that the
President is attempting to have elimi-
nated. The chief arguments againstt
delaying the decision of the legisla-
ture on the appropriation to be grant-_
ed, as set forth and stressed again
by President Little Friday night, a
convincing.
Iegarding University appropria-
tions, it should be everywhere recog-
nized, that, first, contractors, in the
case of construction of new buildings,I
a matter vitally important to the Uni-1
versity at this time in view of the
many new projects, must be dealt
with after the work is finished rather
than before, as should be the case,
which entails, as a rule, increased ex-
penditure in payment; second, delaI
is caused in hiring men when the
amount to be appropriated is in doubt;t
third, "by delaying the final action on
the appropriations for the various in-1
stitutions of higher education until
the last few days of the session, the
legislature, then leaving the capitol,
places lpon the shoulders of the chief.
executive of the state an altogether
unnecessary and unwelcome burden
of deciding which items in the budget
shall be considered the more import-
ant;" fourth, "the needs of higher
education," in President Little's own
words, "as exemplified by the normal
schools, the state college and the
state university have an appeal entirely
different in quality from expenditures
for roads, prisons and hospitals for
the insane."
These arguments are worthy of
consideration. They are not the con-
victions of a moment's thought, but
those of a man who has spent a great
deal of time and effort in studying
the problem. They commend the sup-
port of the legislature and the citizens
of the state.
IN UNION
What has at many times promised

to develop into one of the world's
finest organizations for the promotion
of international understanding, the
Pan-American Union, is to be put on
a permanent basis if plans now under
consideration materialize. The com-
mittee working on preparations for
the Havana conference to be held in
January, 1928, is also arranging a
plan whereby the Pan-American
Union will become a lasting organiza-
tion founded on a permanent and en-
during basis.
At the present time the organization
exists only for ten year periods, be-
ing renewed at the expiration of each
of these periods for a similar term.
While this plan has worked thus far,
in a satisfactory manner, there is no
reason why a union with the sound
basis of this one should not acquire
the added stability that a permanent
organization can give it.
Since its origination in 1889 thc
Pan-American Union has accomplish-
ed an inestimable amount towards
the promotion of understanding be-
tween all the nations of the Americas.;
During this time it has received th
continued, and sometimes the en-
thusiastic support of the nations rep-
resented. It is encouraging to see that
these nations have found its accomp-
lishments so worthwhile that they

OASTED ROLL THEA-TER
BO OK S
TILL'TSON
N OPENED IU3 C
Michigan's new athletic field, Lake
Tillotson received its hantism in yes-

i'

The U. of M. Pen

Pew
%wool

The ever-growing popularity of

Rider's

terday's official opening of the 1927
football tangle.

/* *I
The Athletic association's promise y
that no spot would be left unwateredi
was thoroughly fulfilled. The drench-s
ing rain immediately preceding thea
game left the field a solid sheet o
water, only a few protruding grass
blades in the shallow spots provingC
the fact that there was solid land be-'
neath.t
* * *
.Some of the water drained off dur- I
ing the game, until part of Lake Til-
lotson's bed came clearly into view.C
However, all the low spots remainedC
filled and throughout the game the
Michigan players found it necessaryI
to use a bridge to cross from their
benches to the playing field.
* x *
The nature of the contest that wasI
to be played was in doubt until til
last moment. Iowever, at a last min-
ute conference, an agreement was
reached and football received the de-
cision in preference to water polo.
Equipped with life preservers and
rubber boots, the Michigani squad
lined up for the kickoff. Water wings
furnished the equipment for the Ohio
team.
* '5 *
Standing on a portable platform
Michigan's stellar kicker punted off to
the opposing team. Swimming with
a rapid stroke the receiver scooped up
the ball and turned toward the Michi-
gan goal. Reaching a shallow level
on the field he almost broke awayI
from his opponents but an unexpectedi
soft spot brought about his downfall.
* * *f
Difficulty in removing the kickofft
platform from the field was responsi-t
ble for a long Ohio gain. As the work-I
men were striving to push it acrossa
the sidelines an end climbed to its I
top and received a long forward pass.f
* * *
Michigan gained the ball on the1
next play when a pass from centerI
shot over the heads of the rival team.
Captain Benny's rapid crawl stroke
proved the decisive factor in the race
that followed to recover the ball.
* * *
The first touchdown was made on
the following play by Michigan's
dimnutive fullback. Discarding his
life preserver, he swam under water
for 20 yards, and on coming to the1
surface found little difficulty in out-i
distancing his pursuers.
Michigan missed the point after l
touchdown when in attempting a placei
kick from a spot above the water thei
kicker became mired down and was
surrounded by Ohio players before he
could get free. Both teams were very
tired and were give several minutes
of rest while the kickoff platform
was being floated out on the lake.
* * *
Ohio suffered a most unfortunate
accident as play was being resumed.i
While climbing the platform in
preparation for the kickoff, the kicker
lost his balance and fell into the lake.
Ile was uninjured by the fall but had
swallowed so much water that he was
kept out for the remainder of the first
half.
* * * *
Ohio suffered a 10-yard penalty late
in the half for delaying the game. In
attempting a variation of the under-
water play that scored Michigan's
opening Iouchdown, her quarterback
remained under water so long that he
had to be rescued.
* * *
As the half ended, the bands climb-
ed onto large flat barges and floated

out on the lake. The traditional
march between goal-posts was omitted,
since there were many shallow spots
that were ,not navigable.
* * *
Only one touchdown was scored
during the second half. Michigan'
right half broke away once and cross-
ed the goal line but the play was call-
ed back when it was discovered that.
the signals had been misunderstood
and the ball should have been carried
by the fullback.
* * *
After the final whistle had blown,
the teams gathered in the center of
the lake to discuss the fine points of
the play. By a unanimous vote, it was
decided that next year some other
game would be chosen.
* * *
AS USUAL, large blocks of re-
served s e a t s remained unfilled:
throughout Saturday's game.
* * *
SPECTATORS found difficulty in

THE GIGLI PROGRA)L
Beniamino Gigli, tenor, assisted by
Miss Edythe Browning, soprano, will
present the following program in the
initial concert of the Choral Union
series Friday evening, Oct. 7, in Hill
auditorium:
0 Paradiso, from "L'Africane"..
... .l.eyereer
O Bei Nido d'Amour.........Donaudy
Tre Giorni Son Che Nina..Pergolesi
O Del Mio Dolce Ardor ........Gluck
Beniamino Gigli
Pleurez, pleurez les yeux, from
"Le Cid" ..............Mas-net
Chanson Triste .............Dupare
Chere Nuit .................Bachelet
Edythe Browning
M'Appari from "Martha" ......Flotow
Beniamino Gighi
Intermission
Come Love with Me ......Carnevali
Life ........................ Curran
Tes Yeux..................Rabey
Un reve .......................Grieg
Beniamino Gigi
A Feast of Lanterns.......Bantock
My Love o'er the Water Bends
Dreaming.............. Moscato
Pace, Pace, from "La Forez del
Destino".................Verdi
Edythe Browning
Vestl La Giubba,( from "Pag -
a'cci"'............Leoncavallo
Beniamino Gigi
The accompaniments will be by
Vito Carnevali.
* * *
THE THEATER GUILD
The Michigan Theater League has
secured through the activity of Grace
Denton, Detroit impresaria, the tour-
ing company of the New York Theater
Guild for three anyway-and perhaps
four-performances in the Whitney
theater. The dates and productions
that have been selected are as fol-
tows: George Bernard Shaw's "Arms
and the Man" on Thursday, Nov. 17;
Fdrenc Molnar's "The Guardsman"
for Thursday, Nov. 24; and "The Silver
Cord" by Sidney Howard on Thursday,
Dec. 1. Maybe A. A. Milie's "Mr.
Pim Passes By" will be given at a
special matinee on Thursday, the 24th.
For those who care for good theater
-good acting and good plays, that is
--this will be almost an orgy of play-
going. Of course this is not the first
company, for Lynn Fontanne, Alfred
Lunt, Margalo Gillmore, Earl Larri-
more, Helen Westley and the other
iinmortelles are now in Chicago for a
brief fall season, prior to opening
their new plays in New York. Never-
theless, the casts for the road com-
panies are all Guild members, th
plays are chosen by the Guild Boar
of Managers, and the productions hav
been under the personal direction of
Miss Fontanne, Mr. Lunt, Miss Eames
and the other play chairmen.
--V. C. W.
* * *
DRAMA FROM THE RIO GRANDIE
Tomorrow night the Mimes are pre-
senting the first play of the season-
"The Bad Man," by Emerson Porter
Urowne-and the initial trumpet of
the new dramatic cycle has sounded.
Despite the fact that it has been in re-
hearsal less than two weeks, "The
Bad Man" should possess the same
appeal and excellence that placed
"Anna Christie," "The Man of Des-
CiRy," "S. S. Glencarin," "Beggarman"
and "Engaged" high in the annals of
local theatrical history.
-E. M. M.
- ~ * * *
"THE DARK GENTLEMAN," by G.
B. Stern; 179 pp: Alfred A. Knopf,

New York; $2.00. Book by couprtesy
of the West Wind Lending Library.
A review by Nelson J. Smith, Jr.
If you are the kind of a person that
likes to feel the cold muzzle of a mas-
tiff as you stalk through the streets
at night; if you like to tumble a Pek-
inese or a Pomeranian around on the
carpet and tease him with a ball; if
you are one of the persons that
thinks that dogs are more intelligelit
and better company than the average
person (as I do), then you will cher-
ish this book.
Not that there is anything Ter-
hunish about it. It is, indeed, a satire
on human life and relations wich en-
dows dogs with the power of speech
and parodies our life in a sophisticat-
ed, smart, and bitingly keen manner..
"It was not etiquette to acknowledge
that when the Legs called, sooner or
later you had to obey. 'I've just got
to go and see a dog about a man,' Toes
remarked in an offhand way, to the
Chows, who understood the formula
perfectely."...."I think it's fine and
brave of animals to live together with-
out a lot of fuss and ceremony and
prearrangement. After all, they're
married in the sight of Dog," Tessa

r1

"Master en"

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is due to its unequalled writing quality, large ink capacity and durability,
combined with factory service by the makers rig! ht here in Ann Arbdr.
Rider's Pen Shop.1
315 State Street

Ann Arbor

U

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NEW

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SOME OF T H IS YEAR'S BEST TITLES

4

LIFE AND THE STUI)ENT, Charles H. Cooley,
THOSE DISTURBING MI RACLES, Lloyd
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THE NE T AGE OF MAN, Wiggam, $3.00
GIANTS IN THE EARTH, Rolvalag, $.50
TRAN SIIO1N-. MENTAL AUTOBIOGRA"
P IrV, Duiranit, $3.00
THE HIGhER FOOLISHNESS,. David Starr
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A VICTI3I OF CIRCUMSTANCES, George Ges-
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Jean Aibry, $10.00
TE G ARAN I 1 )TilIE E S, Westcott, $2.50.
'l E B AC hIAN T E, lichews, $2.50
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0 RAIE BEN JOHNSON. Steel, $3.00
WhAT CAN A MAN BELIEVE?, Barton, $2.50

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NEW BOOKS COMING DAILY-SPECIAL PRICES TO
LIBRARIES AND READING- CLUBS

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Main Street, Opposiae' Court House

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i.

K AKE
I lie Better Rae
-Now-
'PALS IN PERIL"
with
Buffalo Bill, Jr.
Tuesday, Laura La Plante
"Butterflies Iii Tle Rain"
Thursday, 1oug. Fairbanks
in "The Black Pirate"
OM AE&

OR P HEUM
THEATE
TUES. and WED
One of those super-laugh com-
edies you have heard so much
about, with the greatest laugh
team yet.

e

Get \ Y r
Your
Dates
for This
One
4'
MCPADDENV

--;-
- - - - - --' --
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i
F 1x 14 1
1 fl ~"'" '" " " 5
-build our reputation
Seen, heard, many times a day--few
things make their presence known -
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Good clocks at reasonable prices-a
rule here - a rule without exCe itons.
SeClocks that hourly charm the ear \
ithswmaethedirhpmes;cecknowna
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A

are willing to place its
on a perx'anent basis-a

organization
basis lasting

'iods ever experienced by a nation i
a financial way, and has passed

as the inevitably amity between n~a
tions so closely linked in interests.

Imo',

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