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October 01, 1927 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-10-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

GEOGRAPHER
NEW EN'GLAND
AREA DURING S
RE~SEARCIL is SPON~
CLARK SCHOOL
C EOG(RAP11Y
OCCUPIES TWO
Farming And Manufactur
Mill Towns Are loth
On In BlackstoneV

FIRSTJLIFE CONVIC
IS JUSTIFIED
The "first conviction and sentence
to life imprisonment under the nw
S LLAL [criminal code was a just and fitting
'example of society to protect itself
II M[ f~om the habit ua l criminal," said Prof.
JlI j Burke Shartel, of the law department,
iin an interview yesterday. .
SORED BY Professor Shartel referred to the re-
OF cent case of a Lansing man sentenced
.to life imprisonment after his fifth
conviction for felonies comitted in the
SEASONS past years. The nan was Veing
sought by Lansing police ater having
ing In -Sm Al jumped a bail of $5,000, and in the raid
Carried upon his home, a pint of liquor was
Carried ound in his possession. The posses-
VT.z-. fl1?

T ION UNDER NEW CRIMINAL CODE
BY' SHART;EL AS PROTECTIVE MEASURE

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During the past summer Assistant
Prof. Preston E. James of the geogra-
phy department completed the field
work of a regional survey of the
Blackstone Valley in Massachusetts 1
and Rhode Island: This research prob-
lem was undertaken in connectionI
with a series of similar surveys of
typical areas in New England spon-
sored by the Clark School of Geogra-
phy, at Worcester, Mass. Professor
James was assisted by Charles Crit-
tenden, a graduate student in the de-
partment of geography. The Black-
stone Valley is the site of a prosper-
ous textile industry, being marked in
its 40 miles of length by a number of
small mill towns.
Included Large Area.
Prof. James' study included an area
along the valley and the bordering
upland of either side about 40 miles
long and four or five miles wide.
While mill towns with their more com-
plex lifeare found stringing down the
valley 'bottom, the upland remains a
hay and pasture land, with milk and
cream as the chief products. Old colo-
nial farm houses, small hay fields or
pastures inclosed by stone walls of
Srounded glacier boulders, or unused
brush lands and scrub forest occupy
the uplands, where one seems to find
a world apart, in the greatest contrast
to the bustle and activity of the val-
ley below.
Two field seasons were required to
complete the field work in this area.
During the first season a reconnais-
sance survey was made, on which the
chief divisions of the area were
mapped out. Areas of forests and of
cleared crop or pasture land were rec-
ognized. The urban areas were set off
from the rural districts. Generalized
?maps were drawn showing the extent
of fairly level upland, of valley bottom,
and of steeper intermediate slopes.
Surface Maps ade.
During the second field season, just
completed, 10 typical square-mile
units were chosen for detailed investi-
gation gMaps of surface, soil, land use,
buildings, and roads were constructed
on a scale of six inches to the mile.
The farms or cities in these type stud-.
ies were investigated in detail.
In addition to the field work, the
course of settlement and development
in the Blackstone was studied from
town to town, histories and records,
and from old maps and surveys of the
region. Professor James plans to com-
plete the work during the coming win-
ter. He will make a report to the As-
socation of, American Geographers at
its December meeting.
KANSAS--Final plans for a newl
Natural Science building are now ne-
ing completed.

"ROLL on RUBBER"
Affording Silent,
ShockAbsorbing Speed
Has Started Everyone
to Roller Skating
Around the Universities you see
students roller skatng to and fromi
iheir studies, in the town' house
Uives are skating to market and for
ple asure. busine ss Men are skating
or better health and recreation, on
the open road hikers now "Roll on
Riubber," and children are roller
skating everywhere.
"CHICAGOS" made this roller
skate popularity possible. Con-
structed like a fine piece of machin-
ery, their "high speed" dis- wheels
spin ten times longer on the ball
bearings; the special composition
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and giving 'four-wheel" brake effect
in stopping-and they outwear steel
wheels two to onel
From all good dealers or sent direct
on receipt of $4.00and your deal-
er's name.
(#4 CA
Roller Swtes
'RUDI3DEKTIMR
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sr....-paic
Write TodaYl'
fpr This FREL
1 Rolter skating is one
of the easiest. most
enjoyable and-exhila-
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? 1' ia ok tllts yo,,
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sio
list
fel
lig
pi'i
for
des
pri;
the
ha
ne.
av g
eve
feb
ha

an of the liquor was added to his'
of crimes, making a total of five
onies, so that the judge was ob-
d to sentence the man, to life Im-
sonment. "Although the occasion
final conviction was not in itself
erving of a sentence of life im-
sonment, the man's crimesbefore
alast conviction slow him to be a
>itual criminal of the very type the
v law proposes to protect society
inst," stated Professor Shartel.
It must be borne in mind that for
ry conviction of a criminal for a
ony, the chances are that the man,
s committed several crimes without

being caught. The difficulty in fixing
the crime upon the proper person, of
bringing the accused to trial, and of
getting a jury to convict a man on the
evidence offered is so great that r+l-
atively few criminals of the habitual
type are convicted for every offense."
Professor Shartel remarked that
the new Michigan criminal code, as
passed by the recent state legislature,
was a pattern of the Baumes law of
New York, which also provides life im-
prisonnent or capital punishment for
criminals convicted for the fourth
time ofserimus .rimes.

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BENIAMINO CIGLI
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7, 8 P. M
1BEN 0 GEIG L
utstanding Tenor of the Metropolitan
Opera Company, assisted by
E DYTHE BROWNING, Dramatic Soprano
and VITO CARNEVALI, Pianist
in a thrillinig program of monumental
songs and arias
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 8 P. M.
1 AND
World Masters of Two Piano Playing
na tremendous progr am for two pianos

The Detroit Edison Company

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WEDNESDAY, NOVE MBER 23, 8 P. M.
JOS E F H O F A NN
World Renowned Pianist

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TUESDAY, JANUARY 18, 8 P.M.
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"There is a time in. every man's education
when he arrives at the conviction that envy is
ignorance; that imitation is suicide; that he
must take himself for better or worse as his pon
tion; that though the universe is full of good, no
kernel of nourishnig corn can- come to him but
through his toil bestowed on that plot of ground

T UES DAY, FEBRUARY 1, 8 P. M.

which is given him to till."

--EmersonY

i' ...

WALTER H
in a farewell tour as conductor with the
Neaj YorkSymphony Orchestra
nearly a hundred-players in a program con-
ducted by the famous leader who has been
at its head for more than two score years
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 8 .M.
;FEODOR CHLIPIN.
Russia's Greatest Operatic and
Corcert Singer
in a mighty program of songs and arias
which he has made famous throughout
the world

ANN ARBOR SAVINGS BANK

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