100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 20, 1927 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-02-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1927

THE MICHIGAN DAILY''

PAt"1'F''.' rrTTRr7V''

THF. MTCI-4IGAN DAIlY fl A flT' 'T'TrD1~'

J. tX r: I It I~Ir:

NEW AERO PROF[SSOR COMMANDSFORCES
EXPECTED HERE SOON 11

:-wv.

Holder Of G(uggenhehn Chair Has Had

Varied Experience In Army And
With Airplane Companies
IS MICHIGANGRADUATE
Prof. Lawrence V. Kerber, who was
recently appointed to the Guggenheim
<chair of aeronautics of the University,
will arrive from McCook field late
this month to take charge of his work,
according to word received by Prof.
Herbert C. Sadler, head of the marine
and aeronautical departments in the
Colleges of Engineering and Archi-
tecture.
Professor Kerber was one of the
first aeronautical students to grad-
uate from the University, leaving here
in 1918. His first position was at thel
Martin Airplane company, where he
was engineer in charge of engine per-
formance. In 1919, he left to take
the position of aeronautical engineer
at McCook field, Dayton, Ohio. In
this capacity Professor Kerber was
connected with the development of
all the various designs of aircraft
which has been used in the govern-
ment service.
For some time he was in the re-
serve branch of the army, where he
had direct supervision of all the ob-
server personnel of the flying section.
In this connection, Professor Kerber
gained considerable notice by develop-
ing a new method of determining air-
plane performance and design charts.
From 1926 to the present. time, he
has been chief of the aerodynamic
unit and has had charge of all the
experimental work in the wind tun-
nel, besides responsibility of passing
on all designs submitted to the de-1
partment and supervision of all offi-I
cial reports. le has written numer-
ous papers and books concerning
aeronautics.
Professor Kerber will assist in some
of the general design classes, and will
have charge of the development of
the new work in air transportation )
and the economics of commercial'
flight.

i
I
r
f
I
t
i
S

James J. Meade
Lieutenant-Colonel, who is in com-
mand of the United States marines in
Nicaragua.
PLAN FOR CRUISE

(Continued from Page Two)
attempt to take the members of the
cruise as far off the beaten path as
possible. Also, the expeditions on
shore will correlate with the courses
given on board ship, and side trips
or educational leaders in the coun-
tries visited.
The "Aurania" will make its first
extended stop in the Hawaiian islands,
leaving from New York by way of
Cuba and the Panama canal. Japan,
China, and the interior of Asia, in
addition to the Philippines, will be
visited in the Far East. The cruise
will make extended stops in Egypt
and the Holy Land, and then go on to
Turkey, southern Europe, and the
northern part of the Continent.

ACHIEVEMENTS OF HIGHWAY MEETING
EXCEEDED EXPECT ATIONS -MORRISON
"Accomplishments -of the 13th an- by Dean A. N. Johnson of the Uni-
nual conference on highway engineer- versity of Maryland, a strip of road
ing, which recently closed its four day 'was built in Illinois, costing more
session here, has greatly exceeded our than a quarter million dollars. This
expectations," declared Prof. Roger L. road was then deliberately destroyed
Morrison, of the highway department, by driving heavily loaded trucks over
in commenting upon the value of the the sections built by different mater-
recent meeting. Professor Morrison lals and methods of construction. The
was in charge of all arrangements for test was expensive, but after it was
the convention. "Many new ideas of over, 39 states radically changed their
great value and much vital informa- methods of construction' on the
tion relative to road builqing has been strength of information evolved by the
developed in the past year, and it is tests.
only through the agency of such as "The need of focusing the attention
the conference that they could be suc- of road commissioners and engineers
cessfully disemminated to men inter- on the desirability of making the most
csted in the subject. f out of our gravel roads was another
"From the standpoint of attendance big subject which was emphasized at
alone, the conference has shown that the conference. Our many miles of
there has been a decided increase in gravel roads demand a high efficiency
the interest shown in these authorita- of maintenance.
tive lectures. This year, there were "It is also necessary to broaden our
450 delegates officially registered, and ifoutlook, and in the future think inI
several hundred others attended the terms of millions of cars. As the ad-
meetings without registration. Last dress of Col. Waldon, of Detroit.
year, there were only 354 registered. brought out, within 80 years we may
"One of the greatest accomplish- expect to see more than 70,000,000
ments of the conference, was a real- cars on the highways, as compared to
ization of the importance which re- the 20,000,000 we have now. Needless
search is taking in.our field. In the to say, we must find some manner of
Bates road test, which was explained providing for them.
UTTLE LUNCH
Good Home Cooking
Highest in Quality
Good Service

i
1
RI
t
i
;.

. M
i
s
i
i
i
i
k
I
I
i
i
I
I
i
i
Ii
I
J

I I
I
I-

P a.A .s IE I Y I rS~

is

QGk 1-0 w ;
i
x

TARY
kN

e PataG eat to
ixc
xea GaW ~p
. t dQ, sx >a t ~
--°'1uih i \x 0e
^X ceyAel aSl nx~
podut
to

..
,
a
i

AWN
W

E 3 S i ., r a V
i
l
r J
." / .+'
/;r
I",.'
Y .~/))
j
/.
s i ,jai,
i M1 i 1
._ .,, ~ 3 ;
lo i y" "w '

l
t ,;'
:"r
t
b
a
J !
r, a
f
i' N 'frl
e 11 t4

/ /
N--
N V. f°

.-
: ,r... .,
r .

!#
.a
:
;
i

Five Deluxe Performances
1:30 - 3:40
5:0- 7 :00
8:40
Attend the Tiinees and
Avoid Waiting for Seats

,, 0
4 .

^l /
t J .;,
' lt9

Y
1
.. .. .

--- ,
t;
y !ff.
K :'- i
, L S
t '
l "+
R
, _

0

E
E"

a
1;
. ..

. -,z
- ; .,
< f.
r .i'

'_
I.r.
Xi,
' .,
J'. "

yam.,. -

_ S T .pyl 'I
\\ f
A ~Story Sen t I o an
by
A:.r /\dj

d
till

iNighits at 8:15i
VW, Matinees at 2:15
Popular Matinee Today
The Musical Masterpiece
PRINC

V' 1ersonnl Supervisionm
IM

SHOWINGE

STARTING
TODAY

IB rrn

. t an *- - 1

A n qn n

1J

I

I

1111

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan