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June 05, 1927 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-06-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MJCHICAN DAILY

P-1 OE F TVI

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5
JLVA

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0

1;

TO

BREAK

GROUND

FOR

NEW

B UILDING

CEREMONIES TO TAKE PLASCE ALUMNI DAY,
JUNE 18; OFFICIAL CLAIM TO SITE WILL
BE PRESENTE0 BY MRS. 0.f HENDERSON
Inf<Q guIIT.V dwfITI! m (1 A sA I

ARCHITECTURE OF LEAGUE BUILDING IIAJAAUT f'OUTDIDIITEQ FAMED ALUMNA

ARCHITECTURE OF LEAGUE BUILDING f t( T () T|0||T' FAMED ALUMNA
WILL BE SIMILAR JO THAT OF UNIONiLIIT I i4,UTIIWLU WILL TURN SPAIYE
i~njutU~I4L r~A~lA.LARGEST SINGLE GIFT; . ..W~. J

C(QG WATULA'LJONS
On the occasion of breaking
ground for the Women's league
building, congratulations are due
not only to those who have borne
the brunt of the work incidental
to the campaign, but also to all
of those who have contributed in
anyway whatever to the comple-
tion of the required amount of
pledges.
Coming as a sister building to
the Michigan Union, the League
building will be in a strong posi-
tion to avoid the mistakes and to
utilize the experience of the older
organization.
The opportunity to establish
ideal relations between the social
life of Michigan women and their
academic obligations is now to be
provided.uThe degree to which
we can utilize this opportunity
will depend upon wise coopera-
tion and division of labor be-
tween the governing board of the
League building and the officers
of the University..
There would seem to be no
question but that as the result
of the use of the building Michi-
gan women will be able to de-
velop stronger. loyalties, more
lasting friendships and a wider
and finer conception of what
their University can mean as a
dominant force throughout their
lives.
C. C. Liittle.

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Gift Builds And Furnishes Women's
Lounge As A Memorial For ,
Ethel Fountain Hussey
iNQRS EARLY LEADER
Robert Patterson Lamont, '91E, Hon.
'12, of Labe Forest, Illinois, has made
the largest private contribution to the
league building fund by his magnif-
icent gift of $100,000 presented last
October. This gift is to build and fur-
nish the large women's lounge, which
is to be a memorial for Ethel Foun-
tain Hussey, first president of the
Women's league.
Mrs. Hussey graduated in 1891 and
was president of the league for 1890-
1891. She was the moving spirit of
the women's dormitories and league
building idea, being a member of the
original committee which planned the
organization of the league. The plans
made by this committee were com-
pleted in June, 1890, and the first
Women's league board meeting was
I held October 7, 1890.
Ethel Fountain Hussey was one of
the leaders in this work. Her popu-
larity and efficiency are shown by the
fact that she was elected as the first
head of the organization.
Mr. Lomont's gift, besides being of
immense material benefit to the
league, gave great stimulus to the cru-
sade for funds. All friends of Michigan
are deeply grateful to him for his.
generosity.
Most of the other large sums have
comne from the various alumnae
groups throughout the country. De-
troit, New York and Chicago have
been particularly active as have the
smaller groups of Toledo, Grand Rap-
ids, Cleveland, and the Ann Arbor
women.

DR. KOSHER RETURNS
FOR JUNE [RCISES
Dr Eliza M. Mosher, who is to turn
the first spade of earth for the Wo-
men's league building on June 18, was
the first dean of women of the Uni-
versity from 1896 to 1902. She was
largely responsible for ,the building of
Barbour gymnasium, in,1898, the first
building for women on the campus.
Dr. Mosher is one of the most dis-
tinguished graduates of the Univer-
sity. Graduated in 1875, she has been
in active practice of medicine for more
than 50 years. At Michigan she has
been dean of women and professor
of hygiene and home economics.
Among other positions she has held
that of resident physician at the
Massachusetts reform prison for wo-
men, and lecturers at Vassar and Wel-
lesley colleges.
She is now the honorary president
of the Women's National Medical As-
sociation, and editor-in-chief of the
Women's Medical Journal.
ident. It is to her that the main en-
trance room will be dedicated.
Interested people have likened the
Women's league building to the Union,
but Mr. Pond sees it as even more.
Added grace and delicacy of design he
Nays, will make it even more of an in-
fluence upon the lives of those using
'it.
It is the hope of the alumnae that
this building may carry out the ideals
of Ethel Fountain and those early
leaders, for among their first plans/
was the hope that someday the women
might have a magnificent club house
representative of their interests and
ambitions. Now, at the end of a five-
year campaign, the alumni council
and the undergraduate women are able
to claim the plans of such a building
as their own.

|

IS CHAIRMAN OF
ALUMNAE COUNCIL

According to the plans of the archi-
tects, Pond and Pond of Chicago, the
entrance to the new building will face,
the Mall, and will consist of an im-
posing doorway at the foot of a digni-
fied tower and opening into a spa-
cious room a few steps higher.
The exterior of the building will be
of dull red brick, similar in style and
architecture to the Union. The type
has been chosen as an expression of
modern college life; it will constitute
"a college club, dignified and yet in-
formal enough to be the natural meet-
ing ground of all women."
Off of the south corridor the per-
sonal service rooms, a beauty shop,
kitchenette service, a tea room, and
[cafeteria will be located. At the north
end is the entrance to the, proposed
theater portion of the building.
Social Facilities On Second
The second floor will be devoted en-
tirely to social purposes. Between
the theater on the north and the as-
sembly room on the south are the
serving roomis, a dihiing room for men
and women, a hostess' room and of-
fices overlooking the walled-in gar-1
den. On tlie west of the corridor in
the tower portion is located the large
concourse, for women only. To the
north of this is the women's private
lounge, and to the south a lounge open
to both' men and women. These par-s
lors are two stories in height, and will
it is hoped be endowed by special
gifts.
On the third floor in the tower and.
occupying the space between the up-
per part of the two lounges is a
memorial library, which will be beau-
tifully furnished and decorated. The
library itself has been started by a
gift. Overlooking the cloistered gar-
den, and to the east of the library is
the alumnae room, having a huge fire-
place and upholstered furniture ap-
propriate for. it. This room is sur-
rounded by service and committee
BLUE
HAIR S:
Beauty is the ultimate real
of face, hands anr hair. C
to give you this care.
Dial
5 Nicke
1 - -- - --- - - -

dining rooms for various clubs and
organizations of the league.
Bedrooms occupy most of the space
on the fourth floor, which will accom-
modate twenty-one people guests of
the League.
Court To Be Cloistered Garden
The walled in garden will be a de-
lightful spot, and forms the center of
all the attractive rooms. It will be
sunk one step below the level of the1
first story. On one side there will be a:
terrace and perhaps a fountain at
the other. The balcony of the assem-,
bly hall on the second floor will open
to it and the garden will be accessable
from the terrace and the main lobby.
This cloistered nook will be quite in-
formal, having a grass plot in the
center, and paved border.
The other rooms 'of the building are
to be slightly smaller than those of
the Union. The main dining room will
seat from 240 to 3;60 people, and "both
private dining rooms and committee
rooms can be put into service during
a rush. The cafeteria will seat 180
people, and the banquet or assembly
will seat 3 L1 to 466 people, and the
annex will accomn odate; 90 to 112,
800 in all. The tearoom has a soft
drink counter at one end:;and a serve
self at the other. There will also be
a place where the *tudents can make
their own tea or fudge. In the kitchen-
ette the students may prepare their
own luncheons or prepare their own
tea-parties.
The personal service rooms are a
new feature in clubs, and will be es-
pecially appreciated by the women in
the University. There are dressing
rooms for women guests, with tub and
shower baths. The beauty shop 'will
give hair dressing, shampooing, mas-
sage, manicuring, shoeshining and
cllothes pressing. There will also be
self service rooms for those women
or guests who prefer to do these
things for themselves.

Dr. Elisha X. Mosher
PRESIDENT ANGELL
PROPOSED LEAGUE
Seeing the handicaps facing the
first women who came to the Univer-
sity of Michigan. President Robert
Angell conceived the idea of an organ-
ization whereby they could effect their'
own extra-curricular government and
find contracts which would make their
undergraduate days happier.
Cooperating with a few of the lead-
ers among the wives of the faculty
and the prominent senior women, an
embryo Women's league was founded
with Ethel Fountain as the first pres-

II _ .

- -K
w a Jd Grw-ek
ijuw772~b

E rs. Shirley Smith
Mrs. Smith has been chairman ,of
the alumnae council during the last
period of its activities in the interests
of the new building. With her has
worked Mrs. W. D. 4enderson, execu-
tive secretary of the alumnae council
as active head of the finance cam-
paign.
Mrs. Mary Curtis Bok, wife of Ed-
ward Bok, has increased the endow-,
ment of the Curtis Institute of Music
of Philadelphia which she founded in
1924 to $12,500,000.
The cornerstone of the new science
building of the Illinois Women's Col-
lege has been tapped into place with
the hammer that was used for the
first building 81 years ago.

BIRD
iHOPPE

[zation of skillful treatment
Our operators are prepared

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Is Arcade

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Constantly Worn Without Wearing Out

Whit±e an inevitable mode of Summer.

Seen against the green of a sum-

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_. _ _ .-

RUBY RING.
"Just can't get n hos l I w a ry u
Ring stockings, and J'm lard ota hQosiery "A We har
lots of remarks"like . 'uchl: wears
should mean5fewer sa' for u, but w fird it hs the
opposite effect. Wom.n hmd they ca affrd wic t
number of pairs and they are always elng other'
The Ruby Ring is an inte riking mnter e hat is form-
ing an endless chain)> d r Ii s ockig.

I

i

i
ii

mer's day there is no color more delightfully cool. And on a hot day there
is no frock one feels more inclined to slip into than a crisp white frock. The
spart woman invariably includes white in her wardiobe. A coat she finds
indispensable for wear with any of her light colored frocks. A white hat she
deems a summer necessity. And white frocks she chooses for their coolness and
their chic. Ijow well she knows that the outstandingly fresh appearance she
presents in white is responsible for much of her charm on a warm summer

11

day.

I

Silk Dresses $9.95 Up
Silk Pleated ,Skirts, $10.75
Tailored Blouses $1.98T

Hats $5.00
losiery $1.50

Flannel Coats $19.75
Linen Dresses $5
Sweaters $3.50

C l . flr

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11

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11

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