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June 05, 1927 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1927-06-05

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ESTABLISHED
1890

Y

*It x

:43 at I

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

I

VOL. XXXVII. No. 180

TEN PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN. SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 1927

TEN PAGES

PRICE!i FIVE CENTS

I milli

. __,,,,,

.:LINDBERGH SETS SAIL~
FROM FRENCH SHORES
ON.CRUSERMEMPHIS
AMERICAN AIR HERO ACCORDED
TREMENDOUS OVATION
BY ALL FRANCE
RECEPTION PLANS MADE
Coolidge To Extend Personal Welcome
To Flyer On His Arrival
In National Capital
(By Associated Press)
CHERBOURG, France, June 4-The
United States cruiser Memphis steam-
ed out of Cherbourg harbor at 4:30
o'clock this afternoon, taking Capt.
Charles Lindberghhome.
To the last minute the American
transatlantic loe flier was lauded in
speeches and cheered by the people,
and when at last he finally stepped
from French soil he was made to feel,
as perhaps never before during his
stay, that he carries with him a sen-
timent that can be won only by great
things done as he has done them mod-
estly.
The pilot of the monoplane, the
"Spirit of St. Louis," aboard the Mem-
phis tonight will have his first chance
to get a real rest. He will be able for
the first time since he glided down on
Le Bourget field to go to bed without
thinking of what ceremony on the
morrow. Also for the first time in a
fortnight he will be removed from the
dangerous temptation to take chances
with unfamiliar aircraft.
Brings France Closer To U. S.
The American boy goes home in a
blaze of glory and probably just in
time not to perceive the fatigue he
experienced in the prolonged effort of
the French people to give him his
due, but he goes in full possession
of French admiration and with a mes-
sage, which, told in his modest, ear-,
nest way, cannot fail to bring France
and the United States closer to-
gether.
WASHINGTON, June 4- Official I
Washington divided its time today be-
tween following the course of the dra-
matic flight of the airplane "Colum-
bia" from New York for an unnamed
destination in Europe and arranging
for the reception' here next Saturday
of Captain Charles A. Lindbergh, hero
of the first New York to Paris hop.
Arriving here at noon next Satur-
day, Captain Lindbergh will be per-
sonally welcomed and decorated by
President Coolidge; will remain here
over Sunday, and will take off from
Bolling field between 6 a. m. and 8
a. m. M6nday, June 13, for New York,
in his monoplane in which he made
his epochal air voyage.
Arrangements for the reception of
the world's flying hero were complet-
ed today by the semi-official recep-
tion committee which announced
that its members .and the District of
Columbia commissioners would greet
the young flier at the Washington
navy yard when the Memphis docked.
Captain Lindbergh will be escorted
to the Washington monument by the
"President's - own" troop of cavalry
and there will be welcomed by the
President and be presented with the
Distinguished Flying Cross, the high-
est award of the American air ser-
vice.
Parade Will Form
A military parade will form behind
the aviator at Peace monument, on
the west side of the Capital and fol-
low him to the monument grounds.
There will be about 2000 in this line
of march, the committtee holding the
number low on the theory that the
thousands who will crowd the na-
tional capital on that day will want to
see Lindbergh and not a parade.

President Coolidge will wait the av-
iator on a special stand at the foot
of the knoll upon which Washington's

BLACK=ROBED SENIORS TO RECEIVE
SHEEPSKINS ERE FOR TIGHT ENDS

Michigan's black - robed seniors,
clothed in a dignity that they have
been striving for four years to obtain,
will mount the platform at Ferry field
ere another fortnight slips away and
receive the sheepskin affidavits that
mean the end of college for them-if
they have paid their ten dollar diploma
fee.
Beginning Friday, June 17, with the
class day exercises the Com'mence-
ment week-end will be fully occupied.
Alumni day follows on Saturday, and
Sunday morning President Clarence
Cook Little will deliver his last ad-
dress to the seniors in the Baccaau-
reate services in Hill auditorium.
Monday morning bright and early the
really exciting part of the whole cere
monies comes when the slow and
dirge-like procession wends its way to
Ferry Field, there to hear the Com-
mencenent address by Nicholas Long-.
worth, Speaker of the House of Rep-
resentatives of the 69th Congress. The
address over, taps will be sounded,
and Michigan's 2,000 seniors, the bul-
wark of her activities for the last
year, wil file across the platform and
receive what is left of their education.
For the benefit of those seniors who
fmiss Commencement The Summer
Daily will publish an extra to appear
on the streets immediately following
SENATE WILL DISCUSSI
UNIVERSITY COLLEGE.
Group Will Consider Revised Report
Of Committee On Undergraduate
Studies At Same Time
WILL ASK AUTHORIZATION
University College plans will be
further discussed, it is expected, when
the University senate meets next
Tuesday night. The revised report of
the Committee on Undergraduate
studies will be considered at this time.
This report favoring the new college
was adopted unanimously recently by
the committee.
The report asks that the senate re-
quest the Board of Regents to author-'
ize the establishment of University'
College and that this College include
all students of less than junior stand-
ing in the present colleges of the Uni-
versity which admit students directly
from high school, with the understand.
ing that these students shall be mein
bers of University College for the
first two years of their course or un-
til such time as they qualify for ad-
mission to one of the other schools
or colleges of the University.
An exception provides that any ex-
isting college in which the curricula
are not controlled largely by condi-
tions and regulations of the Univer-
sity, or in which it can be shown that
the best interests of the students
would be jeopardized by the changes,
Smay admit students directly from high
school until conditions make possible
complete cooperation with University
College.
The committee also asks that the
senate request the regents to author-
ize the president of the University to
appoint a committee representing the
various schools and colleges to work
out details of plans for University
College, which will be submitted to the
faculties of the various groups so that
the faculties may claim the privilege
of taking students direct from high
school if they desire to do so.
- LELAND STANFORD
DEFEATS WESTERN
SCHOOLS IN MEET
(By Associated Press)
COLISEUM, Los Angeles, June 4-
Leland Stanford university won the

the ceremonies. It is claimed by those
who should remember that classes
have graduated for years and years;
and many confidently expect that the
loss will he recompensed by another
freshman class next fall. So Michigan
moves on, each year another crop of
black-robed seniors filing across the
platform-; each year another freshman
class to move, by imperceptible stages,
toward the same goal.
,JONES LEAVS STAFFl
Journalism Instructor Accepts Place
As Chief Editor Of Nine Papers
In Nellis Organization
SUCCESSOR NOT SELECTED
Howard P. Jones, instructor in
journalism, has submitted his resigna-
tion from the faculty of the University
in order to accept the position of
editor-in-chief of the Nellis newspap-
ers, according to an announcement
made yesterday. The resignation will
take effect at the close of the present
semester.
Mr. Jones has been an instructor
in journalism here for the past two
years, coming to the University from
the Evansville, (Ind.) Press where he
held the position of managing editor.
The organization, whose editorial di-
rection will be taken over by Mr-
Jones, comprises a chain of nine
newspapers with headquarters at Mt.
Clemens.
In commenting upon his new posi-
tion, Mr. Jones stated yesterday that
he was vitally interested in the jour-
nalism department here and its de-
velopment, but that he considered his
recent offer an opportunity which
could not be lightly cast aside. Prais-
ing the work of his associate, Prof.
John L. Brumm, Mr. Jones said it
was his opinion that, in the face of
many handicaps, the journalistic work
done at the University is on a par with
that undertaken in almost any other
university in the country.
Mr. Jones is an alumnus of the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin and Columbia
university, where he specialized in
journalism.
It has not been definitely decided
who will take over Mr. Jones' courses
during the Summer session. A num-
her of applications for the position
have already been received, Professor
Brumm said yesterday. Arrangements
for Mr. Jones' successor next semester
will be announced later.
BUSINESS SENIORS
ADOPT NEW COLOR
Drab tassels on the mortarboards
of the seniors of the School of Busi-
ness Administration will be changed
to light blue for the Commencement
ceremonies, it was announced yester-
day by officials of that school. !
The drab tassels, it was explained,
are for seniors in schools of account-
ing and commerce, while the light
blue distinguishes business adminis-
tration students. The tassels will be
light enough so as to be easily dis-
tinguishable from the blue of the
seniors of the School of Education, it
was said.
ARCHITECTURAL SOCIETY
HOLDS ANNUAL ELECTION
The regular annual election of offi-
cers for the Architectural society held
yesterday in the Architectural build-
ing resulted in the choice of the fol-
c lowing: President, Willard J. Wendt
'28; Vice President, Otto F. Wenzler

Jr., '28; Secretary, William L. Page,
s '29; Treasurer, Samuel Wetzel, '28;
-land Curator, Edward C. Cummings,
' ,29.

RHEOCC UPATIO'N PLANS
COTNTINUEAS THREAT
O.F RIVER__DIMI1NISHES
EXODI)S FROM CONCENTRATION
CAMPS IN NORTH PARTS
IS EXPECTED SOON
TAKE HEALTH PRECAUTION
Levees Along Railway And At Berwick
Are Considered Safe Although
Rescue Crews Stand By
(Special to The Daily)
NEW ORLEANS, June 4.-With the
flood's threat. rapidly diminishing in
the lower Atchafalaya river basin
plans went forward today for the
steady repatriation and reconstruc-
tion of the upper reaches where the
waters continue to recede.
Levees at Berwick and half a dozen
small towns along the Southern Paci-
fic railway, about 110 miles west of
New Orleans, were considered safe'
unless an unexpected rise of water
developed. The rescue crews assem-
bled in the region stood by as a pre-
cautionary measure, but it was not
believed their services would be need-
ed further.
Within the next ten days the exodus
from concentration camps in the
northern portion of the flooded zone
is expected to be general. A few
refugees already had begun returning
to their homes as fast as ridges ap-
pear above the murky waters.
The second contingent to return to
the Bayou DesGlaises country, about
150 miles northwest of New Orleans,

(By Associated Press)
U. S. S. MAYFLOWER, President's
Yacht, off Cape Henry, Va., June 4.-
The United States fleet today proudly
paraded past President Coolidge, its
commander in chief, to take up its.
farflung posts in the seven seas of
the world.
For an hour and 40 minutes the
mighty grey war machines of the seas
plowed their way past the presidential
yacht Mayflower, under the eyes of the
President, Secretary Wilbur and Ad-
miral Eberle, chief of naval operations
and as the huge battleship bringing up
the rear cam-a abreast of the review-
ing yacht, Mr. Coolidge ordered the
signal "well done" to be flashed.
Clear weather brought the fleet into
bold view as the flagship, the armored
cruiser Seattle, in the lead, turned its
nose into Hampton Roads shortly after
noon for the parade between the twin
capes of Virginia-Henry and Charles
-out into the rolling Atlantic.
The 97 ships, constituting the
greatest concentration of America's
sea forces here since the war, stretch-
ed out over 15 miles and included
every form of fighting and auxiliary
craft. It was Mr. Coolidge's first view
of the fleet.
BELLANCA MONOPLANEI
DEPARTS FOR EUROPE
Rome, Berlin, Constantinople, Lenin-
grad, Mentioned As Among Possible
. Landing Places Of Plane
IDEAL WEATHER REPORTED

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FLEET PARADES PAST COOLIDGE
ON WAY TO WORLD =WIDE POSTS

i

sailed today on the steamer Tuscum- (By Associated Press>
bia, which also carried provisions for NEW YORK, June 4.-The Bellanca
refugee camps. monoplane Columbia was over the
Have Sanitary Examination North Atlantic tonight headed east1
From one quarter of the flooded with the farthest European point it
Atchafalaya river vally to the other, can reach, as the objective, in an ef-,
sanitary experts and medical men are fort to wrest the world's record for
preparing to examine the flooded ter- long distance flying from Charles!
ritory to ascertain when it will be Lindbergh. Rome, Berlin, Constanti-
possible to make the homeward move- nople and Leningrad were mentioned I
ment general. as possible landing places.
For the most part the refugees will Ideal weather was reported as the
not be allowed to return until their little plane flew true on its course
homes and towns have been declared from the United States to Novia Scotia (
from the standpoint of health. and so on towards its indefinite goal.
Livestock will remain in concentra- Tail winds were helping the plane's
tion centers until sufficient feed is as- early success and promise to assist all
sured for them in the flooded zone. the way across the ocean. In the late
afternoon the plane was sighted off
CHICAGO, June 4.-Recommenda- Novia Scotia and apparently holding
tion for recognition of flood control to a offshore course which reduced.
as a -national responsibility, immedi- chances of observation of its progress.
ate federal relief fort sufferers in the At the controls as the Columbia
present Mississippi river flood and hustled through the night, was Clar-
for the appointment of a presidenital ence Chamberlin, 32 year old former
conference on flood control, will be cowboy, army aviator, and holder with
placed before President Calvin Cool- Bert Acosta of the world endurance
idge at his earliest convenience. record, which was made in this very
Authorized To Visit President plane. Beside him in the cabin was
The last official act of the executive Charles A. Levine, his financial back-
committee of the flood control confer- er, and the surprise member of the
ence which ended a three-day session crew. Levine is 30 years old, began
I her today was authorization for its ex- life as a stableboy, and then became
officio chairman, Mayor William Hale wealthy as a dealer in metals. He is
Thompson, of Chicago, to go to Wash- an amateur flier, but has done very
1 ington and place before the President little flying and whether or not he
the conclusions finally embodied in could be of practical assistance to
resolutions passed today without a Chamberlin was a matter of specula-
dissenting voice among the 1800 dele- tion.
gates who shouted their votes. Reports late today from Novia
Roy O. West, of Chicago, secretary Scotia Indicated the Columbia was fly-
of the Republican national committee, ing several hours behind the schedule
,upon request agreed to write to Pres- set by Lindbergh, making arrival in
ident Coolidge to ascertain the earliest Ireland not probable before late to-
date upon which he would receive morrow afternoon, Eastern daylight
Mayor Thompson and as many of his saving time.
fellow members of the executive com-__
mittee as could take the trip to the F . I
capital. I .PUBLICATION SUSPENDED I
It was believed by the conference I
leaders that President Coolidge would ' With this issue, The Michigan I
wish to receive immediately the for.. Daily suspends publication for
mal notification of the virtually na- the summer vacation. The Sum-
tional sentiment expressed by the mer Daily will publish Cow- I
hundreds of delegates who answered mencement extras on June 17 and 1
the call of Mayor Thompson.. June 20, and will begin daily is- 1
sues with that of Tuesday, June
-MINNESOTA-This year's graduat- 28, continuing until August 14.
I ing class of Minnesota University willi The regular Daily will resume
sponsor the presentation of the' 1 publication at the end of the va-
opera "Carmen" on June 11 in the cation period with the issue of
Memorial stadium as part of the sen- I Tuesday; September 20.
ior week functions. [

Wearing the commander-in-chief's
hat, the President was on the bridge
of the Mayflower, anchored about two
and a half miles northwest of Cape
Henry, at the doorway of the Atlantic
when the double and single column
formation in battle array hove into
sight under the protection of a fleet
of 28 planes, slightly in advance. The
Seattle, bearing Admiral Charles
Hughes, commander-in-qhief of the
combined scouting and battle fleet,
headed the procession from Hamp-
ton Roads.
YOST TO MEET WITH-
COUNCIL COMMITTEE
Coach Invites Members To Discuss
Cheering Section Plans
For Next Fall
HORNBERGER IS LEADER
At the invitation of Coach Fielding
H. Yost, director of intercollegiate
athletics, members of the Student
council cheering section committee
will meet with him early next week
to discuss the recent action of the
Board in Control of Athletics in re-
gard to the cheering section regula-
tions.
Coach Yost has given his assur-
ance to the members of the Council
committee that the Board will be glad
to reconsider the situation fairly
from every standpaint, and it is pos-
sible that some revision may be made
in the regulations now enacted. Coach
Yost expressed himself as confident
that any present difficulties as far as
the students are concerned can be
adjusted. I
The difficulty over the cheering see-
tion arose when the Council protest-
ed against the action of the Board in
Control of Athletics which prohibited
students in the section from receiving
the extra ticket applications to which
they would otherwise be entitled. The
Council protested against the other
ruling of the Board which also would
prevent the' section from being perma-
nent for the year, thus obviating the
possibility of using uniforms as was
done last year for the first time.
According to the tentative seating
arrangements of the new stadium
there will be 1,200 seats set aside
for the cheering section near the cen-
ter of the field. If the permanent sec-
tion is not used it will be impossible
to use the uniforms and some such
expedient as cardboard squares will
have to be substituted.
The Student council feels also, ac-
cording to its resolution, that the elim-
ination of extra ticket applications by
students who take part in the cheer-
ing section is an unfair discrimina-
tion against them. This action was
taken by the Board in Control of Ath-
letics because of the fact that some of
the students had scalped tickets se-
cured through this method last year.
ENGLISH VICARAGE
OFFERS WELCOME
Officers ofthe Uniontrecently re-
ceived a letter from St. Andrew's
Vicarage, Peckham, London, England,
inviting all University students who
are in London during the summer to
visit the Vicarage The Vicar, Sydney
Coleman. wished to make it plain that
all American students who are abroad
at any time are very welcome to call
at the Vicarage.
At a meeting of the Board of Di-
rectors of the Union the invitation
was accepted and a motion was passed
to extend thanks to the Vicar and to
post the invitation on the Union bul-
letin board.
MISS RYAN LOSES

TO HELEN WILLS

VARSITY TAKES THIRD
PLACE lN CONFERENCE
BY VANQUISHING OHIO
OHIO LOSES CHANCE FOR TIE
FOR THIRD PLACE AND
D)ROPS TO FOURTH
MILLER YIELDS SIX ITS
Blanchard Leads Ohio Attack With
Two Hits As Miller-Ames Pitch.
ing Duel Fails To Appear

Herbert E. Tedder
Michigan entrenched herself firmly
and finally in third place in the 1927
Western Conference baseball realm by
literally pounding the life out of the
Ohio State team in the last game of
the year yesterday in a 15-4 mas-
sacre on Ferry field. A victory for
the fourth place Buckeyes would have
given them a tie with the Wolverines.
This win gives the Maize and Blue
a record of eight victories and four
losses for the season, right bthind the
co-leaders, Illinois and Iowa who have
won seven games and lost thmee.
The much anticipated pitching duel
between Red Ames, star Buckeye soph-
omore hurler and Don Miller, ace of
the Wolverine pitching staff, failed to
materialize when Ames departed for
the showers before a Michigan player
had been retired in the first inning.
During his brief stay on the mound,
he issued bases on balls to each of
the four men who faced him. Loos,
Neblung, and Weintraub walked to fill
the bases and Loos was forced across
the plate when Morse also got a pass.
With Michigan well started on her
way, Ames was replaced by Blanch-
ard. Mackey the Ohio catcher, made a
low throw to third which rolled into
left field and Neblung scored. Wein-
traub crossed the plate on Corriden's
fly to left field and Puckewartz sent
Morse in with the fourth run on his
single through short to end the first
inning scoring.
Miller Fans Buckeyes
Don Miller, meanwhile, was taming
the Buckeyes, getting credit for two
strike-outs in the, first and three
more in the second. After another
Buckeye fanned to start the third,
Ohio came suddenly to life. Blanchard
slammed out a triple which was fol-
lowed by Riehl's home run to account
for Ohio's first two runs. Miller
struck out 11 men and only allowed
six hits.
Ohio got an.bitious again an'the
fifth inning and came within a run of
evening the game by scoring twice.
After Sokol had struck out and Mack-
ey had gone out to Oosterbaan un-
assisted, Blanchard started an- attempt
to win his own game with his second
extra base hit in succession, a double
to center. He took third on a passed
ball. Reihl walked and took second.
Both men scored on Tressel's single
and Ohio was through for the day.
Michigan Scores In Fifth
The Wolverines, however, made
things secure by scoring six more runs
in their half of the fifth on three
hits; two bases on balls, an error and
-three sacrifices. Ten Wolverines bat-
ted in this inning, Loos starting and

p
.
!.

ending the affair.
Box score:
Michigan
AB
Loos, ss . ...... .4
Nebelung, rft........3
Weintraub, 3b ......4
Morse, 2b ..........2
Corriden, If .........3
Puckelwartz, cf ....4
Oosterbaan, lb ......5
Davis, c...........4
Miller, p ............4

R
3
2
4
2
2
1
1
0
0

H
1
0
2
0
3
2
2
0
1

PO
2
0
1
1
0
3
7
11
2

A.
1
0
1
2
0
0
0
1
5
10

E
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
2

34 15 11 27
'Ohio

monument towers. Grouped around Pacific Coast Intercollegiate Athleti
this stand will - be the Cabinet, the championship here today by a margin
Supreme court, the diplomatic corps, of two points over Southern California
senators and representatives and gov-' The victory for the Stanford athletes
ernment officials. was the third this year over the Uni
Robert Nungesser, brother of Capt. versity of Southern California. Stan
Charles Nungesser, who with Capt. ford wrested the intercollegiate Four-
FrancoisColi, has been missing since A championship from the Trojans a'
their attempt to span. the Atlantic Philadelphia last Saturday.
ocean from Paris, will have a place The Cardinals exxhibited their great-
in the President's stand. Robert Nun- est strength in the field and nosed
gesser is a resident of Washington, out their rivals when .Hoffman cap-
conducting a machine shop here. tured the final event, the discus. Stan-
ford's score was 55.1-2.
SENIORS ARRANGE Three Pacific Coast intercollegiate
Crecords toppled before the Southern
CL.ASS BREAKFAST Californians but the points gained in
these events were notenough to check
Due to a misunderstanding concern- that potent arp of Stanford's aggre.
ing arrangements, the officers of the gation-the field.

AB R H PO AE
Riehl, ss ............4' 2 1 1 6 1
Tressel, 3b .........5 0 2 1 2 '1
Karow, 2b........4 0 0 4 1 0
Tarbert, cf .. ........3 0 0 3 0 0

iva " va. "a iuiav .avsi..a.

I
-,
a-
e

LAYING OF TURF AND POURING OF CONCRETE GIVES
.. PROMISE OF RAPID WORK IN COMPLETING STADIUM

With the laying of turf op the play- S stadium are most remarkable. For
ing field of Michigan's new stadium, instance, it is not generally known,
and the pouring of tons of concrete but it is one of the outstanding fea-
daily into the forms. that are to shape tures of the structure, that sufficient
the great bowl, construction work electrical equipment will be installed
that gave so little. promise last fall to hold a game at night if necessary.
is rapidly rounding to completion;at It never will be necessary, of course,
and Ohio Wesleyan, which plays here f but for night pageants or ceremonies,
in the opening game next fall, will both possible uses of the bowl, the
step into a complete and finished equipment will be invaluable.

convenience conceivable. At either
end of the stand will be a sound proof
radio booth, and the whole will be
wired to a portable phone on the
sidelines from which the head lines-
man can phone technical points of the
game.
In seating capacity the stadium will
be one of the largest, if not the larg-
est in the world. Permanent seats

(By Associated Press) iddifield, 1b ......4 0 1 7 1 0
STAMFORD HILL, Eng., June 4.- Sokol, lf ............3 0 0 3 0 1
Helen Wills today won the North kMartin, If............1 0 0 0 0 0
London championship by deetngfIMarken, ic .........1260 0 00
Miss Elizabeth Ryan of California in Mackey, c..........2 0 0 3 -0 1
the finals of the women's singles. The Ames, p............0 0 0 0 0 0
score was 6-2, 6-2. Blanchard, p ........3 2 2 1 0 0
Miss Ryan had all her work cut out lSutton, p ........1 0 0 0 0 0
to win as many games as she did, for
Miss Wills generally was dictating her 35 4 Z 24 10 4
opponent's next stroke. Miss -Ryan, in
addition to serving many double
faults, was unable to bring her cele- R H E
brated chop stroke into play, while Michigan.......401 060 04x-15 11 2
'Miss Wills drove beautifully on back- Ohio.........002 020 000- 4 6 4
hand, seldom going to the net. Two base hit--Blanchard; three base
hits-Blanchard, Corriden; home run
i IAT. . sacrifice hits - Nebelung,
1 I FINL BASEBLL STANINGS 1 orse. Dvis: St uck ou.1byMiller. 11

senior education class wish to an-I
nounce that class breakfast will be

RTlTf[lGY STATION I

I

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