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June 04, 1927 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-06-04

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THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

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SATURDAY, JUNE 4, 1927

DAILY OFII
Publication in the Bulletin is constru
the University. Copy received by the.
3:30 p. m. (11:30 a. m. Saturdays). C

1 BULLETIN'
uctive notice to all members of
Assistant to the President until
oDy must be typewritten.
E 4, 1927 NUWMER 179

VOLUME VII

SATURDAY, JUN]

Notice to Students Having Library Books:
Apparently the notice which appeared in the DAILY for May 29th has
been overlooked by a large number of students. All students having books
from the Library are hereby notified that under the rules of the Regents
such books must be returned before examinations begin. Failure so to re-
turn them necessarily deprives a student of his credits for the semester
until his record with the Library is cleared,
Win. W. Bishop, Librarian.
Fall Registration Information:
By action of the Board of Regents registration in the fall of 1927 has
been changed from the schedule as stated in last year's Bulletins and An-
nouncements of the University. The corrected dates are as follows:
Registration for Freshmen-September 12. (The activities
of Freshman week will continue throughout the week
September 12-19.)
Registration for Upper Classmen-Begins September 14.
Classes begin in all departments of the University on Mon-
day, September 19.
These dates supersede all previous announcements and should be care-
fully noted by all students and faculty members.
Ira ll. Smith, Registrar.
Summer Session Hours of Registration:
For the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts,-in the Recorder's
Office, University Hall, June 23 and 24, 9 to 12 A. M., and 2 to 4 P. M.; June
25 and 27, 9 to 12 A. M. and 2 to s P. M.. Ther.eafter 10 to 12 A. M. daily.
For the Colleges of Engineering and Architecture,-in West Engineering
Building, June 23, 24, 25 and 27, 8 to 12 and 2 to 5 P. M.
For the Medical School,-in the Medical Building, June 23, 24, 25 and
27, 9 to 12 A. M. and 2 to 4 P. M.
For the College of Pharmacy,-in the Chemistry and Pharmacy Building,
June 23, 24, 25, and 27, 9 to 19 A. M. and 2 to 5 P. M.
For the School of Education, including Hygiene and Public Health,
Physical Education, Public Health Nursing, and Athletic Coaching and Ad-
ministration,-in Tappan Hall, June 23, 24, 25, and 27, 9 to 12 A. M. and 2
to 4 P. M.
For the Law School,-in the Law building, June 17, 18, and 20, 9 to 12
A. M. and 2 to 4 P. M.
For the School of Business Administration,-in Tappan Hall, June 23,
24. 25, and 27, 9 to 12 A. M. and 2 to 4 P. M.
For ths Graduate School,-in Angell Hall, June 23, 24, 25, and 27, 9 to
12 and 2 to 4 P. M.
Edward H. Kraus.
Plans For Baccalaureate and Commencment:
All who expect to take part in the exercises of Commencement week will
please take note of the following schedule in order that there will be as
little confusion as possible in carrying out the program:-Punctuality is
especially important as the processions will start on scheduled time.
BACCALUREATE-Sunday, June 19, 11:00 A. M.
WEATHER FAIR
TIME OF ASSEMBLY-10:15 A. M.
PLACES OF ASSEMBLY.
Members of the Faculties in the dressing rooms second and third floors
of Hill Auditorium where they may robe. Enter by rear doors.
Students of the various schools and colleges, as follows:
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS on Main Diagonal walk
between Library and Engineering Buildings.
EDUCATION on walk North side of Physiology and Pharmacology
Building.
BuiENGINEERING on Main Diagonal walk in Engineering Court.
ARCHITECTURE on Main Diagonal walk in Engineering Arch (behind
Engineers).
MEDICAL on diagonal walk between Chemistry Building and Library.
NURSES on diagonal walk between Chemistry Buildig and Library
(behind Medics).
LAW on East and West walk, West of. the intersection in front of
Library.
PHARMACY on East and West walk, West of the intersection in front
of Library (behind Law).
DENTAL SURGERY on North and South walk in rear of North wing
of University Hall.
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION on walk in front of Physiology and
Pharmacology Building.
GRADUATE on East and West walk West of Library entrance.
WEATHER RAINY
A sprinkle will, not be considered rainy. It must actually rain with no
prospect of clearing.
Students will proceed .directly to Hill Auditorium. Seats will be re-
served until 10:50 A. M.
COMMENCEMENT-Monday, June 20, 9:00 A. M.
WEATHER FAIR
TIME OF ASSEMBLY-7:45 A. M.
PLACES OF ASSEMBLY.
Members of the Faculties and invited guests, in Alumni Memorial Hall-
West Gallery second floor where they may robe.
Regents, ex-Regents, Deans and candidates for Honorary Degrees, in
Alumni Memoral Hall-Room B.
Honor Guard, at Alumni Memorial Hall.
Students, at the same places as for Baccalaureate.
LINE OF MARCH-State Street to Ferry Field.
WEATHER RAINY
Weather Bureau storm flags will be hoisted beneath the American Flag
on the Campus flagstaff and on the flagstaff at Ferry Field to indicate that
the exercises have been transferred to Yost Field House.
Students will proceed directly to the field house and enter through the
Norte doors.
Members of the Faculties will enter through the North doors and take
their places on the platform in the field -house.
Regents, ex-Regents, Deans and Candidates for Honorary Degrees will
assemble in the offices in the north end of the field house.
L. 31. Gram, Chief Marshal

Commencement Tickets:
tickets for Commencement and the Senate Reception may be obtained
at the office of the Secretary beginning Monday, June 6. The Commence-
ment Week. Programs will also be available at that time.
Shirley W. Smith, Secretary.
Automobile Committee:
Stuart H. Sinclair, '27, has been denied special permission to drive an
automobile.
L. R. Blakeslee, '27A, has been denied special permission to operate an
automobile.
Harley A. Haynes, Jr., '29, has been placed on probation until February,
1928, and permission to drive a car denied on account of conduct detri-
mental to the best interests of the University.
Above action taken at meeting June 3, 1927.
Automobile Committee.
Members of the Summer Session Faculties:
Blanks for the Faculty Directory and request cards for the Summer
Michigan Daily are being sent by campus mail to all members of the Sum-
mer Session Staff. Their prompt return mail will be greatly appreciated.
The Summer Daily will be delivered only to those members of the Sum-
mer Session faculty who fill out the request cards.
Edward H. Kraus.
University Senate:
A special meeting of the University Senate will be held in Room C,
Law Building, on Tuesday, June 7, 1927,at 8:00 P. M.
Order of Business: Report of the Senate Committee on Undergraduate
IStudies.
John W. Bradshaw, Secretary of the Senate,
To All 'Members of the Faculty and Staff Having Library Books:
Attention is called to rule III of the Regents' regulations:
"All books borrowed by members of the Faculty shall
be returned on or before....... the Thursday preceding
the annual commencement in June."
For the current year this date is June 16.
Those members of the faculty who are leaving permanently, for the
summer, or for the coming year, are requested to return all Library books
before their departure.
Wm. W. Bishop. Librarian.
Course 42. Psychology of the Abnormal:
Examination will be held in the University Hall Auditorium instead of
as previously announced.
W. B. Pillsbury.
Geology 31:
The final examination in Geology 31 will be held in Room 231 Angell
Hall. L. M. Gould.
Geography 112:
Examination, Saturday afternoon, will be held in Room 2225 Angell Hall.
S. D. Dodge.
Spanish 32, 7:00 Section:
Please bring to the final examination copies of "Zalacain.",
N. 'T. Eddy.
Spanish 114, 2:00 Section:
Please bring to the final examination copies of "Belarmino y Apolonio."
N. W. Eddy.
University of Michigan Band:
Those men not playing in the Commencement Band must turn in their

uniforms and R. 0. T. C. horns at Morris Hall today between 12:30 and
11:45 P. M. only.
Paul F. Schlanderer, Student Manager.
Varsity Glee Club:
All tickets and music MUST be turned in Monday afternoon in Room
308 Michigan Union between 1:30 and 2:30 or between 4:00 and 5:30.
Franklyn D. Burger, Manager.
Junior Research Club:-
The annual banquet of the Junior Research Club will be held at 6:30
P. M. on Tuesday, June 7, at the Michigan Union.
W. E. Bachmann, Secretary.
Cerdle Francals:
Proofs of pictures taken at the Cercle play, "La Sonnette d'Alarme,"
are finished and orders for copies are being taken. Any members of the
club or the cast of the play wishing to obtain prints are requested to get
in touch with me by calling 21953.
Milo S. Ryan, Pres.
Rhodes Scholarship:
Students interested in making application for the Rhodes Scholarship
for 1928 should consult Professor C. B. Vibbert in the office of the Graduate
School, Room 1014 Angell Hall, on Monday, June 6, between 4 and 5.
Ruth A. Rouse.
Outdoor Drawing and Painting Class, Summer Sessigt:
This class will be taught during the coming summer by Mr. Myron B.
Chapin, a member of the Drawing and Painting staff during the regular
academic year. It will meet on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday
afternoons from two to five.
Emil Lorch.

JSHAW LAUDS COLLEGEu
NEYISPAPER TRAINING
Editor Of "Reilew Of Reiieis" Says
Metropolitan Journals Are
Not Greatly Superior
TRAINS FOR LATER WORK
(By Associated Pi ess)
NEW JERSEY, June 3-Undergrad-
uate journalism was termed the most
beneficial of extra-curricular act ivi-
ties by Dr. Albert Shaw, Editor of the
"American Review of Reviews", in a
recent interview to the "Princeton-
ian," the publication of Princeton Uni-
versity.
"Contrary to the most recent opin-
ion on the subject," Dr. Shaw stated,
"I believe that Work on a college
newspaper tends to train a man very
well for future journalistic practice.
I read quite a numnber of these pub-
licationsecarefully every week, and I
cannot see that the standard of news-
writing falls a great deal below that
of the metropolitan journals. Occas-
ionally I run across a provincialism
or an absurdity, but not a great deal
oftener than in my ordinary New York
newsprint; certainly less often than
in the great majority of papers
throughout the country."
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James D. Dole of San
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INSTRUCTOR SAYS
CHEAP BOOKS ARE
AID TO EDUCATIO
DETROIT, June 3-Another clain
for French supremacy over America
has been revealed by M. Andre Delat-
tre,. instructor in French at the Col-
lege of the City of Detroit. Accord
ing to the instructor, this supremacy
lies in the intellectual direction, a
shown by the comparative prices o
books in France and America.
In France the cost of books is much
less than here, in proportion to the
cost of living in both countries. New
books which retail here for from
about $1.50 to $5.00 may be purchased
there for the equivalent of approx
imately twenty-five cents.
According to M. Delattre this low
cost of books in France is all a par
of a system to keel) down the cost o
educating people. All intellectual in
terests are in the hands of the gov
ernment and the government protects
those who want to read from eco
nomic conditions. To study in France
three years for a degree involves a
cost of approximately fourteen dol
lars.

-.

IT'S A TREAT TO, EAT AT
THE
ANN ARBOR RESTAURANT
215 South Main St.

Electrical Aids for
the June Bride are

i.

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F.

Reasonable to Buy
and, are keenly appreciated

1

CHICAGO-The thirty-sixth
alumni reunion will start. on
and continue for five days.

annual
June

TYPEWRITING
R. M. ROSS
1007. Monroe St.
Phone 6293

y 1 mo
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When you have them cleaned, you will want to feel E
confident that they will be returned to you in good condition.
You need not worry if you employ our service.
The bright, sunny days show up all the spots and you =1
cannot afford to have them looking dirty. Remember, you
are judged on the campus by the appearance of your clothes.
W 111E SWAN
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LITTLE IS HEARD
BY WOMEN'S CLUB
(By Associated Press)
GRAND RAPIDS, June 2-In an
address delivered here on Wednesday
evening before the General Federa-
tion of Woman's Clubs, Dr. Clarence
Cook Little told the delegates that
every child has the right to be well
born and that education should begin
early for their entrance into a chang-
ing world. This education should in-
clude the teaching of self-criticism
self-expression, and concentration;
and there should be alternate per-
iods of freedom and control, he said.
KANSAS-Nearly every building on
the campus will contain specially pre-
pared exhibits during commencement
week.

SKILLED "

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Toasters, $2.95 to $12.50
Irons, priced $3.75 to $7.75
Percolators, priced $5.95 to $15.00
Curlers, priced $1.50 to $4.50
Heaters are priced $4.75 to $7.50
Cleaners priced at $59.50 and $75.00
Waffle Irons, priced from $7.95 to $15
Lamps are priced from $2.95 to $25
Cookers-these are priced at $12.50
Ranges may be purchased from $77.50 to $165
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