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June 04, 1927 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-06-04

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PAGE SIX

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RATURDAY. JITNP,, 4. 192"

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SA'PURDAY. J1TNI~ t 1927

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O[S TO MEETACOSTE AND BOROTRA WILL MEET
AMERICAN PAIR IN DOUBLES MATCH
BUCKEYE NINElTODAY

BRITISH TO MAKE B~fl-PIRATE INFIELDER
CUT

r I MAJOR LEAGUES

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7

Tbird Place Berth Is Aim Of 3ieigan
Nine In Final Conference
Ga.me Of Seas on
DON MILLER WILL PITCH '
With at least a tie for third place
in the 1927 standings assured them,
the Wolverines will play Ohio State
this afternoon at Ferry field in the
final ball game of the year. Michigan
has hopes of defeating the Buckeyes
for the second time this season, thus
gaining third position undisputed. The
game will not start until 4:05 o'clock
on account of examinations.
Illinois and Iowa are deadlocked for
first honors this season, having won
seven of their 10 gamnes for a per-
centage of .700. A victory for the Wol-
verines will cinch the berth immediate-
ly below the - two leaders with one
more defeat than the Hawkeyes and
the Illini have sustained and one more
win.
Michigan played the Buckeyes on
May 9 at Columbus and handed them
a 7-3 defeat. Fred Asbeck, startingt
his first Big Ten contest, pitched
a masterful game and held the Ohio,
team to six hits while his mates ham-
mered Klink and Blanchard for 12
safeties.
Although the Ohio team has failed
to live 'up to the championship pre-
dictions made by sport critics early
in the season it includes a trio of ex-
cellent players in Ames, Karow, andI
Tarbert and may be connted on to givej
the Wolverines a stiff battle this after-
noon.

1
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,.EAU.63OTRA EN AOT

French tennis stars, who will meet Tilden and Francis T. Hunter, Ame-I
rica's invadingi doubles team, in the quarter finals of the French hard-court
tennis championship today. La Coste also won his way to the finals of theI
singles tournament by defeating Spence ofSouth Africa, 6-1, 6-3, 6-2,a
through his superior steadiness.
Tilden, by virtue of his defeat of Henri Cochet'in the seni-finals 9-7,6-3,
6-2, will oppose La Coste in the final s. Cochet elintinated Tilden from the'
United States singles championship last fall, so Tilden's three set victory
over his former conqueror shows how much he has improved since his dis-
astrous 1926 season. La Coste, the winner of the United States singles
championship last season, was playing well during his semi-final match,
and is expected to give a good account of himself against Tilden in the
finals on. Sunday.
THE FRESHMEN HADA MEET,

FOR OPEN GOLF TITLE
Ted Ray, Former United States 'open
Champion, Will Attempt Second
Conquest
ENGLAND ENTERS 10 MENE
(By Associated Press) I
NEW YORK, June 3.-Ame ca's
supremacy on the links, which reached
its crest last year in sweeping British
victories by Bobby Jones and Jess
Sweetser, will be subjected to its nrtost
threatening challenge since 1920 inI
the American open championship at
Oakmont, Pa., June 14, 15, and 16.
Ten British Players Entered
Ten places in the starting field al- 3
ready have been set aside for a band of
British professionals whose invasion
has the double objective of successful-I
ly defending the Ryder team trophy
against an American team and of lift-
ing the most coveted of American
links titles. One invader, the power-
ful hitting veteran, Ted Ray, is a
former AnZerican open champion.
Of the many scattering attempts
which foreign stars have made to
penetrate the home defenses, only two
have been successful. Ray's triumph;
seven years ago was the last, terminat-
ing a twenty year stretch during which
no European player was able to break
through. The other victory in 1900
was posted by the great English
stylist, Harry Vardon.-
Vardon Won Title
The success of British forces in
these two campaigns, however, was
pronounced, for on both occasions
compatriots finished in the runner-up
positions. J. H. Taylor of England
was second to Vardon in 1900, twol
strokes behind the winner's score of
313, while Vardon tied three American
players for gecond place in 1920.
There was one other notable British
invasion in 1913 by Vardon and Ray,
when the two famous overseas players 1
finished in a tie with Francis Ouimet,
then a young Boston amateur, for first!
place. To the surprise of critics and
a large gallery, Ouimet then proceed-
ed to win the subsequent play-off,I
shooting 72 to 77 for Vardon and 78
for Ray.
MADISON.-Wisconsin athletic of-C
ficials announce that the Washington-;
Badger crew race has been postponed
juntil June 17.

E "v n+ a - -a /Ad AsO' . . V A
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Hurling Duel Expected
Today's game, like the Wisconsin
contest on Monday, is expected to re-
solve itself into a pitching' duel, with
Don Miller performing for the Wol-
verines and Red Ames, son of the.
former New York Giant star, in the
box for the invaders.
Ames, Ohio's sophomore star, has
; proved one of the most effective
moundsinen in the Big Ten this sea-
Aon, having hurled in most of the
games won by the Buckeyes. One of,
his feature performances of the year
was the Illinois contest, in which he
held the Conference leaders to two
hits.
Curiously enough, the Buckeye team
has never. faced Don Miller, Coach
Fisher's veteran pitcher. In the con-
test at Columbus last year Walter
worked for the Wolverines and in the
return game he started but was re-
lieved by Jablonowski, Miller being
unable to pitch this game because of
illness.
Four Play Last Game
Four members of the Michigan
squad will play their last Big Ten'
game this afternoon. Capt. Bill Puckel-
wartz, Red Davis, and Don Miller are
the regulars appearing against a Con-,
ference opponent fbr the last time,1
while Ruetz, a reserve pitcher, is thef
fourth player to end his Big Ten ca-,
reer.
Ohio State will probably line up
with Widdlefield at first: Karow at
second, Riehl a short, Tressel at
third; Tarbert, Sutton, and Sope in the
outfield; Mackey behind the plate and
Ames in the box with Blanchard and
{ Klink ready for relief duty.'
This afternoon's contest will also
be the last Conference engagement for
five Ohio players, Captain Mackey,
catcher, Karow and Tressel, infielders,
Tarbert, outfielder,rand Blanchard,
pitcher, are the third year men.
MADISON.-Rollie Barnum has been'
awarded his ninth major sport letter.

George Grantham
Second baseman of the Pittsburi
Pirates, who hit a home run in ye
terday's game with the Phillies. Tw
of his teammates, Wright and Wane
also knocked out circuit blows, to giv
the Pirates an 11-1 victory. Aldridg
held the Phillies to four hits.
LAY SOD FOR NEW STADIU
Work was begun yesterday on la
ing down the sod for the football pla
ing field in the new stadium now und
construction west of Ferry fie]
which is to be completed about Octob
1.
Sod is being laid only on the playi
field at present.
MANAGER APPOINTED
William Thielman, '29, has
been appointed minor sports
manager for the next school
year according to an announce-
ment received yesterday. The
work entails charge of the golf
team and is also connected with
hockey, tennis, swimming, and
wrestling squads.
Harold Marks, '29, Gerald Har-
rington, '29, Sidney Steensma,
'29, antd .l..McCarthy, '28A,-..ere
( appointed as assistants.

Ninety-three points is a whole lot of
points for one team to score in a Con-
ference Track meet. It would take a
team-composed of Hubbards, Brook-
inses, Johnsons, Osbornes, McGinnises
and then some to hang up such a
performance-but that is what the
Iowa freshmen did in the recent Bigj
Ten telegraphic meet sponsored byj
the Big Ten Weekly.t
While we have no qu arrel with
Iowa just because they have an
all-star crew of - trackmen, we
would like to make a suggestion
to the trackmen of the other
schools. Either they will have to
get new watches and tapes or new
timers, or lperhays the telegraph
operators are gumming the works
for the other schools in the Big
Ten.
Again, 93 points is a lot, especially
when it happens to be more than the
totals of the two runner-up teams
added together. Ohio didn't do badly
with 40 1-2 to nose out the strong I2- k
lini by a point. Wisconsin had a good
freshman team but only got fourth and
27 1-2.
But something must be done

about Charlie Hoyt and his watchI
-he only managed to get 14 1-2
' points for the young Wolverines.
And, though Charlie is not saying
iiiuch and the teamii wasn't so very
hot, still there were several good
men on the squad.
I !
As for the Michigan yearlings, thereI
is Chapman, a sprinter and broad
jumper. He will probably specialize in
the latter event although he did not
do much in that this season. His mark
in the meet was 21 feet 10 inches, butI
he should develop into a 23 foot man
next year.j
Then there is Hayden, a manI
who can run any distance from 880
yards to two miles and do a credit-
able job of it. He can do right at
2 minutes for the half and about
4::35 in the mile. He ran the two
mile indoors in 10:03.
A good crop of quarter iilers came
out of the squad, as is shown by the
3:25.5 performance to win the mile
relay. Dale and Dalton Seymour and
Reed were the three best men on the
squad as the Seymours both placed
indoors while Reed and Dale gained
(Continued on Page Seven)

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Tavener, Detroit; Simmons,I
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1926-27. I h
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want to have1
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and a safe retu
The Sho
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PRINCETON.-John VanRyn wa
Pitts- elected captain of the 1928 tenni
team.

until June. _.1.,

nds.
Phila-
omas,

CHICAGO [TDRW
MANY STAR ATHLETES
Collegiate track athletes throughout
the country who have starred in inter-
collegiate meets are entered in the an-
nual track and field championships of
the National Collegiate A. A. to be
held in Chicago, at Soldiers' field, June
10 and 11.
The committee is hopeful of getting
Sabin Carr of Yale, the sensational
pole vaulter who recently broke the
world's record with a vault of 14 feet,
to compete. Director Stagg, himself
one of the greatest athletes Vale has
ever produced, intends to send Carr
a personal letter requesting his pres-
ence,
Some of the institutions that have
already sent in their entries are Bay-
lor, Southern Methodist, Kalamazoo'
college, Drake, Texas A. and M., Pitts-
burgh, Butler, University of Washing-
ton, University of Michigan, Iowa
State, Marquette, Grinnell, Hillsdale,
Indiana, Duke, Albion, Detroit City
college, Kansas State, Montana, South
Dakota, and Texas.

x

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- _ ,.'

udents
University:-
st issue of The Michigan
want to thank you one
our loyal patronage for
hope you will enjoy your
fullest extent. To those
ating, I wish all'success' in
eavor, and to those who
he University next fall, I
the pleasure of serving as
here wish you good luck
urn next fall.
Respectfully yours,
TOM CORBETT.
p for Students
AST LIBERTY ST.

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