100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 03, 1927 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-06-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

9

wvxw,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

....

....r.w"

AOtatt ida

r

Published every morning except Mo
Luring the Uversity year by.,the Boar
Contrcel of Student Publications,
Members of Western Confereace Edit
'Association.1
The Associated Press is exclusively
titled to the use for republication of all.
dispatches credited to it or not other
c~edited in this paper and the local news1
fished therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Ar
Michigan, as second class matter. Special
of postage granted by Third Assistant P
mIaster General.
* Subscription by carrier, $375; by 9
4-oo..
Offices: Ann ArberFress Building, IM
fird Street.
Phones: Fditorial, 4925; Business 212T

day
da
orial
en-
news
.wise
pub-
'bor,
rate
'ost-
nail,
fay-
4.

EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
SMITH H. CADY JR.
editor...............W. Calvin Patterson
City Editor ...............Irwin A. Olias
News Editors.........Frederick Shillito
jPhilip C. Brooks
Women's -Edtor....... ...MarionrKubik
Sports Editor...........Wilton A. Simpson
Telegraph Editor...........Morris Zwerdling
Musi and Drama......Vincent C. Wall. Jr.
Night Editors
Charles Behymet Ellis Merry
Carlton Champe Stanford N. Phelps
o Chamberlin Courtland C. Smith
awes Herald Cassam A. Wilson
Assistant City Editors
Carl Burger Henry Thurnaw
Joseph Brunswick
Reporters

Y
n
cl
e
M
{
I
f
1i
i y
J
1
1
r
fi
t
t

In short, the Athletic assoclati
has made two serious mistakes in i
two new regulations. It may be th
the new idea is only planned as an e
periment; but Michigan has expel
mented for years with cheering se
tions, and has run the whole gam
from flags to uniforms. In the pa
season the uniforms have proved ve
satisfactory, and that should settle tl
matter for once and for all.
The student body of Michigan is e,
sentially loyal, and will support an
reasonable project for the welfarec
their school. If a cheering section i
worthwhile, however, it must be cor
ducted on a rational basis, and thi
the two regulations have failed t
note. It is asking too much to expec
the students in the cheering sectio
to give up the right to tickets whic
all other students can secure, and i
is foolish to abolish a plan of organ
ized' cheering which shows such prom
ise as the uniformed cheering section
PROTECTION NEEDED AGAIN
With the conflict between the Pek
ing and the Nationalist forces ii
North China endangering the lives o
foreigners, world powers may sooi
be forced to order troops movement!
to safeguard the lives and property o-
their nationals.
The action contemplated will only
be aken for precautionary purposes
When the split in the Cantonese rank:
showed the slender balance in whicl
the control of China rested, Englanc
and the United States decided that in.
tervening action, even for reparation
for the Nanking outrages, would be
delayed until some responsible Chin-
ese party was apparent. Consequently,
it is practically certain the powers
will confine their activity to defense
movements. In that action, however,
hey are justified to go as far as the
everity of the situation demands.

ion
its
at
x-
ri-
c-
ut
st
,'y ;
he
is-
ay
of
is
-_
It
's
o
ct
>n r
i
n-
n.
n
>f

3
a
f
I I
ht
l
2
f

,

OASED OLL1~Mu1sic Drama
SPRING
RIOT-
ITPRACTICE
W FTHE M IES
Candidates for the riot squad of the Although the present dramatic sea-
Ann Arbor police department have
beenb son is staggering to a timely death
beeien a number of strenuous
workouts lately. According to per- with nothing of interest apparent ex-
sistent rumors, they are working out cept the Senior Girls' Play, the next
on the canine population. promises renewed activity to a re-
* * 4markable extent. There will be a pro-
Tear gas, riot guns and all the latest duction by some dramatic society in
equipment in 100 per cent subjection Mimes theater each week, with the ex-
is being used by the rioteers. A city ception of the week of the Union
championship is the goal of the squad. opera and the Junior Girls' Play.
* * Mimes alone are planning some twelve
A special demonstration in the use to fourteen plays ranging from Shaw
of tear gas was given yesterday under Shakespeare to Ibsen and "Uncle
the direction of Coach O'Brien. The Tom's Cabin." "Seventh Heaven"
men reported it a huge success, and 1 (which is already cast) will opeii the
could hardly be restrained from tak- season, and a revival of "Anna ( ,ris-
ing some right down to the campus tie" Yill follow. Besides the formal
to try on the students. offerings of "The Wild Duck", "The
* ,* *Devil's Disciple" and "The. Merry
COP MAKES TACKLE Wives, of Windsor," there will be
something in modern expressionism,

SUGGESTIONS
r GRADUJ
r-
r

FOR
XTION GIFT$

T "

AT GRAHAM'S

4

~- '

AMERICAN RUG
CLEANING
WORKS
There are only a few in the
United States like this high
grade works, "and none other
near you.
Oriental Rugs washed
by Experts.
Original colors are restored.
Pure Soaps - Rugs Repaired
Reference:
Ann Arbor Savings Bank
or your neighbor.
Dial 8115 ,1032-4 Green St.

SERVICE

r

Graduatin Gifts
What could be more sensible or use than

A Rider Masterpe
A Wahi Desk Set

f'I
i.

Marion Anderson
Margaret Arthur
)easx Campbell
Jessie Church
Cbester E. Clark 4
Fdward C. Cummings
Margaret Clarke
Blancfard W. Cleland
Clarence Edelson Z
William Emery
Robert E. Finch
J. Martin Frissel
obert Gessner
Margaret Gross
Elaine Gruber
Coleman r.bGlencer
HarveyJ Gindersoil
Stewart ooker r
Xorton B. Icove

Milton Kirshbaum
Paul Kern
Sally Knox
RichardKurviak.
Lx. Thomas McKean
Kenneth Patrick
Mary Ptolemy
Morris Quinn
James Sheehan
Sylvia Stone
Mary Louise Taylor
Nelson J. Smith, Jr.
William Thurnau
Marian Welles
Thaddeus Wasielewsk
Sherwood Winslow
Herbert E. Vedder
Milford Vanik

b
tf
A
C
' I t
tl
5E
ic
ndl

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
PAUL W. ARNOLD'
Contracts................William C. Pus
Copywriting.........Thomas E. Sunderlar
Local Advertising...George H, Annable, J
Foreign Advertising ......Laurence Van Tu
Circulation ..............T. Kenneth Have
Publication ...............John H. Bobrin
Accounts...............Francis A. Norqui
Assistants
George B. Ahn Selnma Jensen
W. II. Allman Tames Jordan
F. P. Babcock Marion Kerr.
Freda Bolotin T. N. Lennington
sther A. ;Booze Elizabeth Macauley
G. S. Bradley W. A. Mahaffy
. 0. Brown R. A. Meyer
xliette Cohen R. L. Miller
Florence Cooper G. W. Perrett
C. K. Correll R. W. Preston
B3. V. ,geland M, L. Reading
B: Fishman T. E. Robertson
Alice L. Fouch John W. Ruswinckel
iKatherine L. Fx'ohne A. K. Scherer
-). J. Fuller W. L. Schloss
H. Goldberg Nance Solomon
L. II. Goodman Harvey Talcott
Beatrice Greenberg Fred Toepel
C. W. Hammer G. T. Tremble
A. M. Hinkley Harold Utley
M. R. Hubbard lierbert Varnum
E. L. Ilulse Ray Wachter
H. A. jaehn Verle Within
FRIDAY, JUNE 3, 1927
Night Editor-PAUL J. KERN

-

CAMPUS OPINION
Anonymous : communications will be
disregarded. The names of communt-
cants will, however, be regarded as
confidential upon request.

l

-.----------.---~ II

I

nl
isi

THE UNIVERSITY LOSES
A cheering section is desirable
There seems to be very little doubt
about that either in the minds of the
students or the Board in Control o1
Athletics. It is desirable first because
it is colorful and second because it
gives the team an organized group for
cheers, which scattered over the sta
dium would not and could not re-
spond.
In view of this generally admitted
fact as to the desirability of a cheer-
ing section it is queer indeed that any
group should deliberately take an ac-
tion that seriously jeopardizes both
the effectiveness and the possibility
of the section. Yet the Board in Con-
trol of Athletics, by two recently pass-
ed rulings, have done just this. They
have enacted, in the first place, that
no student sitting in the cheering sec-
tion can have the extra tickets to
which he is ordinarily entitled, and
second that they have provided that
the tickes in the section shall not be
permanent for the season, which elimi-
nates the possibility of having uni-
forms for the men who take part. As
a substitute the Athletic Association
proposes cardboard squares. ,
Both rulings are unsound, if not
totally wrong. In the first place few
students are going to give up the
privilege of buying the extra seats to
which they are entitled merely to aid
in the formation of the cheering sec-
tion. It may be true, as the Athletic
association claims, that there was
sortfie small amount of scalping of these
tickets last fall, but the students who
desire to scalp tickets will no be pre-
vented from it by sitting in the cheer-
ing section. It may be bold but fair
to ask whether any of the 1200 com-
plimentary seats between the 35 yard
lines will get into the hands of scal-
pers, and whether this would be any
reason to lessen that number.
The second provision which the
Athletic association has made is that
the section can not be permanent for
the whole season, thus precluding the
uniformed section. In place of the

t
cl.
tr

k USES OF CLASS AVERAGE
To The Editor:
The substance of the recent report
of the Literary College Faculty Com
mittee on the examination and mark-
lng system has been wrongly stated
in one or two particulars of consider-
able importance. This error was made
both in the first report in the Dail3
of the contents of the Committee's re-
port and in the editorial comment a
day later.
The Committee actually deprecated
the mechanical use of class averages
and the normal curve of distribution
but in the Daily it was represented as
opposing their use altogether. There
is a considerable difference between
the use of class averages and the
normal curve and the miechiaical use
of the same devices. The latter is the
application of the method to all class-
es however small and however varied
the circumstances surrounding the
teaching of that class. The former is
determining the general meaning of A,
B, C, D, E, with reference to the class
average and a normal distribution as
they would be if the number of cases
were large enough to eliminate ap-
preciable error. The larger theclass
the nearer you canareasonably come to
the mechanical application of the
method, but in no case should it be
applied without some use of judgment.
The joint committee of the faculty and
students of some months ago on the.
same subject suggests that as the
number of students approaches 200
the distribution of grades should con-
form more. and$ more to the normal
curve, though it should not be arbi-
trary in any case.
It seems reasonable to assume that
the average knowledge of the subject
and ability to think in the subject
possessed in successive years by
groups of 400 or 500 students, let us
say, should have considerably more
stability than the quality of the final
examination set by the instructor,
hence if the final examination one year
yields an average of 70 for all stu-
dents while another year it yields an
average of 60 the chances are great
that most of that difference is due to
difference in the quality of the two ex-
aminaions and B for instance ought
to begin at a higher numerical point
for the class with 70 average than for
the class with 60 average.
As for the normality of distribution
which assumes that there are about
as many students below the average,
as above and located at symmetrical
distances from the average, so that
the average is called middle C and
there are as many D's and E's as there
are A's and B's, giving a point aver-'
age of 1.0 per hour, this assumption
perhaps should be applied only to
large groups of unselected Freshmen
(such as they are the first semester)
and even then not without some use
of judgment in any particular semes-
ter.

s (ER
f . AR~ES'
s .a 1
f l
s3
h Junior Howls, star quarterback of
Coach O'Brien's riot squad now en-
gaging in spring practice, completes
s a long run.
- " "
"Only a championship team will
' satisfy our alumni," declared Coach
O'Brien, as he wiped an honest tear
from his eye. "Our men are round-
ing out in fine shape. Our star
bomber caught sight of a couple of
students yesterday and we could hard-
ly hold him back. We expect some
wonderful riots next winter."
s* s
SPECIAL SEATS for the policemen
are being included in the plans for the
new Michigan theater. Some of these
riots last quite awhile, and it's a
shame to make the coppers stand up
all the time.
* s
Pictures and diagrams of the lob-
bies of the Arcade and Majestic thea-
ters are the latest devices used by the
coaches. No effort is being spared to
train the men for the great Michigan
sport.
* * *
ASSOCIATION HAS SCARE
"Kill it by kindness," seems to be
the plan of the Athletic association
for the elimination of the student
cheering section in the new stadium.
. * s *
,The prospect of a few students get-
ting a chance for a good view of sev-
eral football ganes before they be-
come alumni was evidently too galling-
a prospect for the Grand Moguls of
the association. So they had to take,
some action.
* a a
Several instances of scalping by,
students in the cheering section lasty
year is the reason given for prohibit- 1
ing the allotment of extra tickets to
those in this year's section. Maybet
they can use the same method and cutI
down on those '1200 complimentary 1
seats.
* * *
MAKING it impossible to use any.
thing but cardboard squares, instead
of the uniforms of last year, was an-
other good move by the association.,
Evidently they want to make every-r
body so disgusted with the cheering
section that'they won't 'yant one next
year.
* a a"
There's at least one bright angle to h
the situation. The Student councila
an opportunity to show that they
eally would like to do something forv
he rest of the campus.
* s , ,
Of course teir violent protests
won't have any effect on the associa-
tion. After all, they're only students.
* a a
POOR BUTTERFLIES
N word from Hollywood has come o
C
to "Daisy" Denton and "Peaches"
Wilcox, erstwhile students of the Uni- a
versity. And now the lads are wond- t
ering if they're really going to be 1
movie stars, after all. o
* * *
"We'll turn down their contract and
take one with another company," de- C
clared one of the beauties excitedly. h
"We owe it to our public," added his N
companion. h
* Ip
We've found a good use for the Gar- a
goyle. It's a good place to send the 0
things we can't use. e

* * * t
SENDB THAT PENNY TO THE i
HOBBS FUND. n

S* * *
MR. MADDY'S CLASS IN ORCHES
TRA SUPERVISION
A review, by Joe Bates Smith.
The' merit of the Supervisor's Or.
chestra lies not with the orchestra a
nit, but to each individual comprisa
ing it. The orchestra itself is not a
functioning organization only in thai
it affords experience for students
planning a profession as supervising
music, teaching and orchestra work
in the grade and high schools. Each
member of the orchestra is planning
to carry the work farther in this di'-
rection, and, in order to give practice
and co-operation, the orchestra was
established. The recital does not rep-
resent meritorious work in synchron-
ization, but rather in individual abil-
ity.
This does not imply that the num-
bers rendered were not without due
credit. The first two selections,
"Serenade" and "Allegro" from Mo-
zart's "Suite" were above the average
of the usual orchestral interpretation.
Greig's "The Last Spring" was also
praiseworthy, but "Molto Lento" and
"Waltz", the two selections played by
the string orchestra were lacking not
only in the successful combination of
the stringed instruments, but also in
the playing as well. Several violins
wailed pitiously above the rest in an
attempted solo, and others missed hit-
ting a note agreed upon by the rest
by a few shades. But then the direc-
tor had previously told the audience
that this string work was new and
the members lacked practice so all is
forivep.
A 'erinet solo by Nicholas Falcone
with orchestrasaccompaniment was ex-
ceptionally well played, although in
the intervals of rest, when the ar-
chestra carried on tbe theme, Mr. Fal-
core , emed unusually ill at ease on
the platform.
Throughout tht program different
members of the orchestra took their
places as conductors, not to show
their versatility, but for practice. Of
these, 'Miss H-elen Hayes, the only
woman conductor of the afternoon
seemed to obtain the best results.
* * *
THE THEATER GUILD PLANS
Besides the new O'Neill play "Marco1
Millions" which the Theater Guild will
probably offer next season, the plans
of that organization have so far been
rather tentative. Definite announce-
ment has been made, however, that
they will open "The Doctor's Dilem-
ma" in Chicago,, with an additional
handful of this season's successes for
a brief fall program. Mr. Lunt and
Miss Fontanne are among those who
will go; Miss Gillmore will not, due to
no vagary on her part, but rather to
fact that the plays to be presented are
not those in which she figures.
* * *
And at the same time, the Guild
will open the New York season with
'Porgy", a dramatization of a novel
f Negro Life on the Charleston wat-
rfronts. The' cast calls for practic-
lly all Negroes, which accounts for
he appearance of the leading mem-
ers of the Guild in the Chicago sea-
on.
* * *
Glenn Hunter has been quoted in a
leveland paper as saying that he
as rejected the Marco role in "Marco
Milions." Mr. Hunter intimated that
e considers Harry Wagstaff Gribble's
lay on the same subject far superior
s material for the theater than Mr.
'Neill's. However, everyone is rath-
r Fused to Mr. Hunter's vehement an-
ipathies-I remember his-violent dis-
ke of "The Green Hat"-so it doesn'tl

lean so much. It might also be men-
ioned that Mr. Hunter has decided
ot to play "Hamlet" in Cleveland
his summer, , but to delay the pro-
uction for another season.

perhaps "Pinwheel" or "Loud Speak-
er."

once and you will be so pleased with the quality of our
food and service that you will be satisfied with no other.
You will find that the few extra steps required to
reach us will be more than compensated by the treat in store
for you.
Special Chicken Dinners every Sunday. o-
-E

A Manicure: Set for the hand bag for the
girls, (the genuine Eversmart).These and many others at

Expert repair work
done on all electrical

I

Rider's Pen Shopi

529 South Main St.

SERVICE

HOME COOKED FOOD

' :
}1 I

.

Come down and try our dainty, delicious

Across from the Wuerth Theatre

s=now.
lmm.

...

I

z

.. .

'; ' r . ..

WALK

-OVER

i

I1

11

F. .r
io~enyour -
tkM ng the first things to go on
are your shoes and stockings:
in other words you begin with
the feet and literally "dress
Sup So be sure whenever you
start to dress up that you start
rigb t--with Walk-Overs.If you
. are- superstitious put on the
left shoe first (or is it the'right
one?) Anyhow, be sure it is a
Walk-Over, and have the sat-
is aCtion of knowing you wil
neet the approval of yourself
and friends if you dress up to,
Walk=Over style.
II STRAP
tEntitngly gracef 13 In Its
/ nalve simplilcty--the toe
/ z$a bit rounder, the heel
high and slender, and its
toling in the pol ar Pas-
r rtel Parchment RK
Same style in White Kid,
also Blak Patent
{ Leather

..

CMANN Sc M
PANAMA AND
STRAW HATS AT
REDUCED PRICES
The cold and backward weather
has left us with quite a large stock!
of Panama, eghorn and Straw Hats
still on hand, which .must be disposed
of at once and which we are offering
it greatly reduced prices.
Genuine Ecuador Panamas
Italian Leghorns
Swiss StrawsI

No occasional fit
it fits any occasion
Busy feet that trip from shopping to teas, from
dinners to dances, find smartness and comfort in
this new Walk-Over. Uncopyable Walk-Over fit
for every foot adds smart and clingingcomfort to

Benjamin Bolt.

In the second semester the average

ences existing atr
mester FreshmenI

present, second se-
0.1 above first se-

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan