100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 29, 1927 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-05-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, MAY 29, 1927

THE MICHIAN DAILY

PAOV rT M

I ___________________________________________________________ - -_________________ ____________

HIGH SCHOOL DEBATE,
LEAGUE' CLSS YEAR~
Tenth Seasin Ends As Local Debaters
Win Unanimous Decision In
Contest With Albion
FOUR THOUSAND ATEND
The Michigan PIigh School Debating
league closed the inwt successful year
of its ten years of °exstence with the
debate betwen Albion and Ann Arbor
high schools May 11 in Hill audito-
rium.
The Ann Arbor high school team was
unanimously conceded the debate by
the judges. 4,000 people attended the
debate, which is the largest audience
that has attended a championship de-
bate of the league. Approximately 75
hlgh schools of the state sent their
teams to Ann Arbor for the debate.
During the present academic year,
the 235 high schools of the .state which
were members of the Michigan High
School Debating league, held over 500
debates in which more than 1,000 high
school pupils participated in the pres-
ence of over 100,000 people of the state
of Michigan.
The subject of the next year's de
bates, while not formally stated at
this time, will concern the abolition
of the direct primaries. A formal
statement of the question, together
with the League literature, will be
sent out to all schools in the state on
Sept. 15.
During the last two years, The De-
troit Free Press has given a wall
plaque as a trophy to each of the
schools that qualified for the elimi-
nation series of the debates. Th'is year
64 schools qualified. The Free Press
also gave a gold watch to each of the
participants in the final debate.
In 1917 the League was organized
as one of. the activities of the Univer-
sity Extension Division with a mem-
bership of 66 schools. Beginnng with
1917 the membership has increased as
follows: 66, 70, 90, 120,135, 140, 166,
175, 200 and 235. -
Phi Sigma Initiates
Eleven At Banquet
Phi Sigma the national honorary
biological society, initiated eleven men
at their Annual spring banquet held
Wednesday night at the Union.
President Clarence CookLittle, who
was unable to attend, was elected to
an/honorary membership. He was a
member of the University. of Maine
chapter before coining to Ann Arbor.
The speaker of the evening was Dr.
G. C. Huber, professor of the depart-
ment of anatomy, who gave a histori-
cal sketch of the development of the
Medical School of the University. He
told of the early faculty members who
were outstanding as organizers and
in scientific development. "These
m.en," he said, "exist now only in m'em-
ory."
New oflcers for the coming years
were elected. W. T. Dempster, gradu-
ate student in zoology, was made
president; B. D. Thuma, grad., vice-
president; J. E. Sass, grad., secretary,
and M. C. Old, grad, treasurer.
YPSILANTI PLANS
FOR AIR PROGRAM
if present plans are carried out, the
largest air meet in the United States
during 1927 will be held at the Ypsi-
lanti airport on June 10, 11, and 12,
at which time the fornal opening of.
the airport will take place. About 200
planes are expected to take part in
the events and new hangers are now
in process of construction for accom-
odating the overflow.

The field at which the meet will
take plac is located on the re-routed'
M-65 between Ann Arbor and Ypsi-
lanti and is used by the University as
its experimental field in connection
with the aeronautical cogrses.
The local pilots who are entered are
Richard Young, chief jilot and in-
structor, George Pinkerton, and Roy
Nass. Young now has a number of
student pilots in training at the flying
field, among which are some students
in the University.
PLAQUE GIVEN PROFESSOR
AS REWARD FOR SERVICES
Dr. Franklin W. Kokomoor of the
mathematics department was present-
ed with a bronze plaque by members
of his freshman mathematics classes.
The gift was made in appreciation of
the sympathetic services rendered to
his classes. Dr. Kokomoor is a grad-
uate of Valparaiso university, Valpa-
raiso, Indiana, and has received his
master of arts degree and doctor of
philosophy degree from the Univer-
si .y.
MINNESOTA-The honor system at
the Minnesota Agricultural college
has been in existence 12 years.

FLIER SETS NEW
SEAPLANE RECORD

5-PERFORMANCES SUNDAY-5

man

HE COMES TO YOU

1,n ola t)

our D)ecoration Day
"ent to Iclude This
oliday Feature

i 4

The--

I.
II

Most Sensational
CIOllege Star
M1Pictures
Here's a story with everything from
Frills to Laughs for Sport Lovers and
Just Lovers!

4Gj
L'-
1

IP !
-h

V

I

4
a ,. (
F
i
_._.. . . s..., __

).-t

Lieut. Rutledge Irvine
United States navy flier, who estab-
lished a new 1.000 kilometer speed
record for seaplanes at Hampton
Roads, Va., when he averaged 130.93
miles an hour for the 1,000 kilometer
cburse (approximately 621 miles),
flying this distance in four hours, 44
minutes and 44.6 seconds.
Resigned Professor
Was One Of Oldest
Members Of Faculty
Prof. Fred N. Scott, head of the
rhetoric department, whose resigna-
tion was accepted by the regents at
its monthly meeting Friday evening,
was one of the oldest members of the
University faculty, and through his
long years of service has won an
international reputation as a rhetoric-
ian and grammarian.
Professor Scott's colleagues have
regarded him as a modernist in the
exposition of speech principles, rather
than as a classicist. It was one of
his courses, given in the last years
of the nineteenth century under the
title of "Rapid Writing" which is
credited with being one of the fore-
runners of present day courses in
news writing and journalism.
Professor Scott's studies and ree-
searches were varied in nature.
Among his essays, books, and philolo-
gical publications, are treatises on
aesthetics, literary style, interpreta-
tion of Biblical passages, the teaching
of English, English grammar, aind
rhetorical theory. He has served as
an officer of many national and inter-
national organizations of English and
rhetoric authorities.
Tram's-Atlantic Aero
Service Is Planned,
Says Boston Paper
(By Associated Press) I
BOSTON, May 28. - The Boston
Traveler, in a. copyrighted story pub-
lished today, says that it has learned
of preparations which have been go-
ing on over a long period of regular
trans-Atlantic airplane service with
giant planes carrying at least 100 pas-
senigers.
The Traveler says:
The Boston Traveler today gives
the first news of the hitherto secret
preparations for regular trans-Atlan-
tic airplane service using giant liners
carrying at least 100 passengers each.
Boston will be one of the first ports
in America to get the service.
"The great trans-oceanic ships will
be heavier-than-air planes. The back-*
ers of the enterprise tested and aban-
doned the idea of using dirigibles.
The date of the start of the service
is not divulged.
"Until now the plan has been pro-
tected by the utmost secrecy. Quick
upon the heels of Capt. Lindbrglh's
triumph comes the Traveler's discov-
ery of the secret preparations that!
have been going on for 16 years with-
out even a breath of it reaching the
ears of a single person outside the
powerful group of engineers, finan-
ciers and sportsmen who are making
possible the gigantic undertaking."
"The trail leads from Boston to New
York and Dayton and finally to the
very heart of it all in an extremely
interesting establishment on a lonely
mountain top in Massachusetts."
"It would appear impossible for
such a celebrity to disappear so ut-
terly from the eyes of the world and
his friends until it is eplained that
fate helped him in his desire for se-
clusion. Several years ago a man of
the same name was killed in Japan
and when word of the death was
cabled to America it was thought that

it was he who was dead. The misun-
derstanding fitted perfectly into the
plans of the man whom the Traveler
reported found on the Massachusetts
mountain top.

TO THE ANN ARBOR PUBLIC:
Itarly do we approach you with a
message of personal endorsement,
because rarely is there a picture that
ivill appeal to EVERYBODY. Now,
)however, we feel we have in "SLIDE,
KELLY, SLIDE" a picture that will
please 999 of every 1,000 who see it.
Seldom have we ever seen a picture
so perfectly counblihqn a story of
heart-interest, of red-blooded thrills
and hearty laughter. We urge you to
see it~
V S. UTT ElFIELDI TIHEATI ES
IN COR1O4RATED

F

',
rr
.l .
" ,y
". .:
r
7t ::,
r
.
.r +""' "'
_
f '

SiT
AV , t

t:
A

:,
,

,#
F.

'' ,/

44~

a

-i. 2

lt~ip

I

-. --4-- * ft14

,
.

,,., ,,,,. ,.."N1

IV V41.1 I' "*

With the "Brown of Harvard" Star
WILLIAM HAINES SALLY O'NEIL
HARRY CAREY KARL DANE
And Presenting the Newest Juvenile Sensation

You don't have to
to enjoy this storyc
"No-Hit Kelly"!
Feminine jurors!
Inside stuff! More
series!

be a baseball fan
of the smart-a ek
Cupid is umpire!
Diamond thrills I
-fun than a world

policy
Sunday
1:30
3:10
4 :45
7:00
8:10
Adults
50c
Children
25c
Decoration
Day.
2:00
3:40
7:00
$:40
Prices
Same as
Sunday

rI
I

'd
i^
,..y
iii!
_ -j
<. .
«s
4;
" '
,.
A.::

.0 I
'-.4'

C'inon--AllB Srats Are Just Be-
hind First or Third Base! Bring
Your Girl-She'll Understand This
"ale.

'Of-
Al Metz
fGoldw3

,,,,,,,.. r,,,,,..- .
. ... .,
_ __
;.-
. ..-
..%

r '
r
' '
:1
/ .
_'i ,.'

';
;. '
. '. = ;
.. ', '.
1+.: r. a 4:. YTi
1
Y" ::.. "i
fix.. ;/
:; ,;
.

ro-
,yu
r
re

/

,-''
f
,. r
.''
,
' 6

f-

/° 7*

ricul

K

.

''
.

..s'

,.- -.iii

.., ,,,--
: :
r s
~ y% '
Y .
^ ,, t
't; r

...
:

%'

- i
-4.--~-:
- . 4 -..

" " _.

,.
_.
'

A

a

F if' f
.} ...--'' a. f
..
^_ . " \.,
.
,,,, .-
, +.
- '

1 ' : * .sr yywl ,
ii-..-

See the World Series Heroes
in Their First Picture

'1

il

I

> > r

rw w " 1 T

I .

11 PA.niitiAiI Inrrrn 'Inte nn npxrnneh;rp nnP Wnrk frnm 11

I

I

AATTP Z' L2nD

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan