100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 29, 1927 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-05-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


ESTABLISHED
1890{

LY

it i!3an

:4Iat

MEMBER ,
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. XXXVII. No. 175

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR. MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MAY 29, 1927

EIGHIT PAGES

PRICE FIVE CENTS

FIVE TOWNS FLOODED1
AS MISSISSIPPI NEARS
NEW ORLEANS OUTLET,
TWO NEW PARISHES MENACED
AS BACKWATERS SWEEP
TOWARD LEVEES
HOOVER CALLS FOIR HELP I
Commerce Secretary Appeals To North'
For $2,000,000 To Aid South
In Reconstruction
(By Associated Press)
NEW ORLEANS, May 27.-Two last
ditch levee fights were being waged in
the Atchafalaya basin tonight as the!
flood waters moved down both sides
of the river in their last destructive '
blow to Iouisana before sweeping
into the Gulf of Mexico. Already
more than 300 square miles on the
east side of the Atchafalaya have
been covered by torrents flowing
through a crevasse at McCrae, and
many more square miles have been
inundated by backwaters of numerous
lakes and bayous.
The greater part of five parishes on
the west side of the river have been
inundated by. a slow-moving lake
which has spread more than a hun-
dred miles down the west Atchafalaya
basin through the Evangeline country
from breaks in Bayou Des Glaises
ramparts.
Backwaters f r o ni the McCrae
crevasses have swelled slowly up the
east side of the Atchfalaya to the
ipper tip of Pointe Coupee and were
climbing a levee around the town of!
Torren near the mouth of Old river.
Engineers were doubtful whether the
levees would be able to restrain the
mounting waters.
Try toRebuild Levee
In the vicinity of Grosse Tete, mid-I
way between the Mississippi and the
Atchafalaya rivers in the "Sugar-
bowl," citizens of Iberville and West?
Baton Rouge parishes were concen-
trating their forces for the recon-
struction of an old levee along Bayou
Grosse. Long unused, they hope to be
able to rebuild it to a sufficient height
to withstand the flood.
Even as they work, backwaters
were threatening them from the rear,
moving slowly northward and east-
ward from the Atchafalaya and the
many bayous and lakes in the vicinity.
Army officers believe that there is
hope that the section can be saved
from inundation.
Hundreds of persons still were
clinging to their homes in the slowly
disappearing territory, leaving only
after the water had risen above their
homes, refusing to leave by truck only
to be forced to take transportation
by boat.I
Many Seek Safety on Levees
Many, after remaining in their
homes in the forlorn hope that they
would b untouched by the flood, fled
to levees for safety. - There, without
food or water, they awaited boats to
transfer them to refugee concentration
camps.
Along the west bank of the Atcha-
falaya the flood was at the last stage
of its journey to the gulf. Grand
Lake, into which the river passes
emerging again on the opposite side
to pass into the Gulf of Mexico, had
swelled over the lowlands of Iberia,
Terre Tonne and St. Marys parishes.
Towns in the lower tier of Louisiana
parishes either had disappeared or
were rapidly vanishing.
The New Orleans weather bureau
has warned that the recession of the
waters would be slow and the towns
on the outskirts of the flood area

should take such precautions as might1
be necessary to guard against theI
adverse possibilities of rains and
high winds.

I ,
BIG TEN ANNOUNCES NX
T'YEAR'S BASKETBALL GAMES
S (By Associated Press)
C MADISON, Wis., May 2-1928
basketball schedule for Big Ten
universities was completed at a
'ascheduled conference'here today.
jThe season opens January 7 and
ends March 10.
I Michigan's schedule is as fol-
lows: January 7-Michigan at
Northwestern; January 9-Mich-
igan at Wisconsin; January 14-
Indiana at Michigan; January 16
-Ohio at Michigan; February 4j
-Michigan at Chicago; Ferbuary
C 11-Purdue at Michigan; Feb-
ruary 15-Chicago at Michigan;
f February 20-Michigan at Pur-
due; February 25-Northwestern E
at Michigan; February 27--Mich-f
j igan at Ohio; March 2-Michigan
I at Indiana; March 5-Wisconsin
E at Mihigan.
RHUSSINS WILL LIEVE
ENLN BY TUESDY'
Hasty Preparations Mark Reception Of
Government Ultimatum To
Soviet Officials
CONSULATE CLOSES DOORS1
(By Associated Press)
LONDON, May 28-What will prob-
ably be the final official communica-
tion to the Soviet legations in Londonj
will be delivered at Chesham house
early next week. It will be a list of
the names of those Russians who will
be permitted to remain in London.
Meanwhile, hasty packing and pre-
parations for departure were the order
of the day at Chesham house and So-
viet house, a sign being posted at the
former place reading. "The Consulate-
general of the R. S. S. is closed.",
The work of leaving, however, has
proved so,h'eavy, that it was found
necessary to postpone the sailing of
the Russian ship Youshar until Tues-
day. This ship will carry 35 Russian
officials and the'bulk of their baggage.
Customs officers are inspecting care-
fully every case taken aboard.,
In a communication to press, Khin-
chuk, head of Arcos, Ltd., said that
the commercial agreement and con-
tract by the Soviet trading organiza-
tion and Arcos are terminated, and
that those concerned are compelled
to wind up their work since the policy
of the British government left them
without the possibility of pursuing
ioperation on the basis of the general
economic plan of the Soviet union.
The statement added that the work
of such organizations as the Russo-
British trade export company and sim-
ilar undertakings will continue if no
obstacles are placed in their ways. M.
Khinchuk expressed regret at being
I compelled to discharge his staff at
such short notice.
The statement also promised that
all contracts with British firms will be
fulfilled to the letter in accordance
with the terms of the contract, and
that all money obligations of the Rus-
sian trading organization would be
1fulfilled similarly as they now are. For
this latter purpose a sufficient staff
will be left in London.
M. Khinchuk further expressed his
firm belief that the British firms un-
der contract and agreement will indi-
cate their willingness and give a guar-
antee of fulfilling their contractual ob-
ligations. In this effect, he concluded,
we assume the British government
will not put any obstacles in the way
of fulfilling of the contract and the fi-
nancial obligations by the Soviet or-
ganizations of British firms.
PARACHU TES SAVE

FOUR FROM DYING
COLUMBUS, May 28.-Fallinga
thousand feet when its propeller

WAR WILL BE BARRED
BY NEW PROPOSAL OF
AMERICAN FOUNDATION
TREATY TERMS WOU1I1) FORCE
PEACEFUL SETTLEM1ENThS
1Y SI'NERS
IS BRIAND'S SUGGESTION
Offers Conciliation, Arbitraion, And
Judiial Settlements As Means
Of Maintaining Peace
(y Associated Press)
NEW YORK, May 27-A draft treaty'
to provide the machinery under which'
could be carried out the suggestion
made last month to the American peo-
ple by Aristides Briand, French' for-
eign minister, that "France would be
willing to enter into an engagement
with America mutually outlawing
war," was made public today by the
American foundation. The foundation
maintains the American Peace Award,
founded by Edward flok.
The treaty form, wich is offered as a
practical application of M. Briand's
suggestion which was made through
the Associated Press on April 6, the
tenth anniversary of the entrance of
the United States into the World war,
seeks to outlaw war, not by fiat, but
by substituting binding methods of
solving all disputes.
Arbitration Made Necessary I
Its main point is that it binds its
signatories, in any dispute of whatever
character, to use on or another pos-
sible methods of peaceful settlement.
Aside from the normal processes of
diplomacy and mediation, the draft
treaty-offers, (1) conciliation; (2) ar-
bitration, by special tribunals at the
Hague Court of arbitration; and, (3)
judicial settlement by the Permanent
Court of International Justice, more
generally known as the World Court.I
If conciliation should fail, the treaty!
binds signatories to submit their dis-
pute either to arbitration or judicial
settlement. Th-e conciliation commis-
sion's findings would not be final, but
the arbitration or judicial awards
would be. Under the proposed treaty
the signatories would agree not to i-
vade each others territory and to re-
train from concentration of arms, from
mobilization, from fighting and from
any hostile act whatever, except in de-
fense or to repel aggression.
In making public the draft treaty,
the American foundation said:
"The treaty now proposed assumes
that every dispute of whatever na-
ture, that has not yield to the usual
possibilities of peaceful adjustment
can be settled in any one of the three
ways offered. Without prescribing any
one of these in any given case, or
even for any given class of questions,
the treaty obligates its signatories
merely to pursue the peaceful methods
of their choice.
The statement says that the only
new machinery set up by the treaty
is the conciliation commission, which,
i however, is not a permanent organiza-
tion. In connection with the use of the
Permanent Court of International
Justice, one of the methods of settling
a dispute. the statement declares that
adherence to the World Court by the
United States would be a logical neces-
sity.
Would Change Policy
The proposed treaty, the statement
added, would mean one fundamental
change in the policy of the United

BIG TEN DOUBLES WNB IHGN
BGICHNIALILINj
(By Associated Press) I
CHICAGO, Mna 28 -Illinois andE E
tennis hin ionshs, on he Univehr- AIOIE PAE T
Michigan universities wn the Big TentniTm
sity of Chicago courts today.
Illinois won the singles title when WNS E S
fatd Lieose olantck dWonseli, SE
its star, Frank 0'Conne, easily de-
7-5, 6-1, and 6-2*0'Connell won the
title in 1926 also, and, by his fast hard- W CInOWSKI PLACES ThI
hitting attack, had a comparatively r HIGH J-MP ANT StCURA
Michigan won the doubles champion-
ship when Kingsley Moore and HorWSO SN O E
ace Barton finally broke throsg.
hard five set match to down the Hi-th
i team, omposed of O'Connell and Lovette Is Day's Hero Taking .1
Bard. The score in that mhatch was 5-7, Second In Discus, Third Iny
1-6, 6-2, 6-1, and 6-3. Although seem- put For 13 1-2 Point Tota
ingly beaten after the first two match
es, the Michigan pair resorted to a By Herbert FVedder
skillful lobbing game. CAMP RANDALL FIELD, Ma
D Wis., May 28.-Michigan an tI
d An C OgR ED .staged another duel to the dea t
LINDBERy H ACCORDE this afternoon with the llini
L successful in the slayingionly
R OW WIT BRUN ELS Nthe last event of the tents
annarstenCerne eneta
fieldinmesethad bee runstffad
OVAIJONL INy 8-RySS El~scns ietidtofut
owski had. brought everlasting
honors Presented To American Flyer; to himself by taking third in th
Is Decorated snd Congratulated jump to boost the Orange Blu
By King Of Belgium hto victory with 46p -oints, wi
is n s AWolverines' claws were clingin
CROWDS WAIT IN LONDON perately to 44 1-3 points and
(yAssociated Press) In amassing its total of 46l
nd sIllinois scored three first plac,
BRUSSELS, May 28.-A royal wel- seconds five thirds, two fourth
come awaited Capt. Charles Lind- I a fifth. Wisconsin's athletespe
bergh, who flew from Paris to Bus- ed brilliantly to take third w
sels today. Within two hours after i 1-2 points, being led by thei
he brought the "Spirit of St. Louis" Iaronpstrn wathucksMes
down upon Belgium soil, King Albert who repeated his feat of landini
had received him at the palace, point honors with 13 1-2 point
showeredcongratulations on him for resenting a first inthe high t
his conquest of the Atlantic and a tie for first inthe pole vault,
pinned on his coat the insignia of second in the high jump.
Knight of the Order of Leopold. I Iwa esFourth
A little later in the afternoon he Iowa was fourth with a tota
was presented with the highly coveted ns, just half ain behi
cicl pfec igmecmn oits usy allfiapont eno nd
gold medal of the Royal Aero club, an Badger team. Ohio Statefinis
honor that only five other airmenB all fifth position with Rasmus g
Belgian citizens, have received. the Buckeye team's single first
The American airman was escorted Northwestern's star athletes ca
all the way from Varis by a flotilla twofs wr ces and tied for a
of French airplanes and was met at to gain sixth place with 19 poi
the border by two squadrons of Bel- The weather could gain ho
d gian army pilots. mention in this meet if not ho
Lindbergh a landed through the wide first place honors. Rain fell
circle of escorting men, coming to -tically all Friday afternoon and
the earth as gently as a bird alight-, ceasing only a few minutes befc
ing. Thousands onthousands of Bel- meet begas. The sodden fle
gians and others had watched his sil- the nearly frigid air renderec
very plane circling the city, and he petition in the majority of t
was cheered by the vast throng as -vnthrile bighjme.
he came down. James-C. Dunn, the' tions were so bad that two
American charge d'affaires, and Henri field events, the high jump a
Taspar, the Belgian premier, met pole vault, had to be held ind
him. Within the next two hours, he The Michigan all-star crew n
had not only beetn received by theantm n te s po
king and the royal family, but had capturing only two first plac'
Tshaken hands with most of the mem- 100 yard dash and the javelin
1hers of the calbinet and several am- Fouir second places were secu
bassador. y the Wolverines, by Ketz in ti
l verywhere he went through the mer throw, Lovette in the
streets the populace of Brussels hail- -Northropin the broad jump, at
i edy himheartilyH le met the members ter in the 220 yard dash.
of the American colony at his cogn- Lovette Is e chiga her
try's embassy and visited the tomb of! Jack Lovette, Michigan's v
the unknown soldier and the mon - I field man, was the hero of the
went to the Belgian airmen who hadiste Maize and Blue, taking fir
ied in battle. At both places he de-in the javelin, second inrthe
posited a wreath, anA third )n the shot put for
Tonight he was the guest of honor 'of 12 points. This made Love
at a dinner given by the Am-erican ner up to McGinnis of Wiscon
I club. In the course of the afternoon was high point man of the me
the flier made his speech from a al- 13 1-2 points. Buck Hester
cony, although he had been called first and a second in the das
out upon many of them by the Euro-{ nine points.
pean crowd. { During the' course of the aft
"Aweek ago this very moment," he ! two Michigan athletes who I
! said, "I was over the Atlantic. There! mained undefeated until to'
were two desires ionniy mind ,--first, Conference opponents met r
to reach Le Bourget, the second, to, Ketz lost to Dart of Northwes
visit Brussels. I landed at Le Bour- the hammer throw, andi Cal
get and now I am in Brussels." Northrop found broad jump

I WIN

IN

TRA CK

MICHIGAN NINE

TO

IOWA,

4T03

l1) IN
ES
lHIRD'
avelin
3hot
l
adison,
Illinois
;h here
being I
after
eventh
ck and
Wach-
fame
e high
e team
ile the
g des-
second
points,.
s, two
is, and
rform-
'ith 35
ir all-
Ginnis,
g high
s, rep-
,urdles,
and a
1 of 35
nd the
hed in
gaining
place.
,ptured
nother
nts.
norable
norary
prac-
I night,
ore the
d and
d com-
e field
Condi-
of the
nd the
oors.
iet dis-
ntment'
es, the
throw.
red by
e ham-
discus,
id les-
+o
ersatile
day for
st place
discus,
a total
tte run-
sin who
et with
took a
hes for
ernoon,
had re-
day by
everses
stern in
pt. Phil
ng im-

ened in the last 300 yards and was
nearly nosed out for fourth place by
Lan'oant of Michigan. Beals and Pon-
zer of Illinois tripped each other as
they came out of the shoot, neither one
figuring in the race.
The 220 yardl dash was a two manI
race from the start, with Hester run
ning neck and neck with Everinghani
of Iowa. The Wolverine star was
barely beat out at the tape by the
Hawkeye sprinter. Kriss of Ohio was
beaten out of third place by Rea of
Minnesota.
Rasmus of Ohio State captured the
discus throw with a toss of over 135
feet, while Lovette and Schravesand
of Michigan toolk second and fourth
places respectively. The mark made
by the Ohio star in Friday's trials
stood as the men failed to better it
yesterday.
lornberger Fails To Place
The two mile run brought Michi-
gan's greatest set-back 'of the day,
when Ted Hornberger finished in sev-
enth place. The Wolverines' great two
miler just could not make the grade. I
Zola of Wisconsin won the event, with
Kennedy of Ohio, Fairfield and Hall of
Illinois, and Payne of Wisconsin
finishing in order. Hunn of Iowa
also failed to gaina place.
Jack Lovette ran his total for the
day to 12 points by winning the jave-
lin throw with a toss of 181 feet and
1 inch. The Wolverines took the lead
when Northrop placed third in this
event. Rinehart of Indiana captured
second place, while Schuerman and
Hayer of Wisconsin finished fourth
and fifth.
art Beats Ketz
One of the greatest surprises of the
day was sprung when Dart of North-
western handed Ketz his first defeat
in Big Ten competition. The Purple
athlete's best effort was 151 feet 1 1-8,
while the Michigan star's best throw
was nearly three feet short of this
mark. Shively of Illinois placed third
in this event while Campbell and Mc-
Caffree of Michigan finished in the
order named.
Indiana's mile relay team placed
ahead of Wisconsin in 4:21.7. The
winning team was composed of Pope,
Abell, Abromson, and Stephenson.
Wisconsin captured second place,
Minnesota third, Illinois fourth, and
Michigan fifth.
With weather conditions unsuitable
for holding the pole vault outside, the
event was run off indoors. McGinms
of Wisconsin and Droegemuller of
Northwestern set a new Conference
record for the event with the bar at
j13 feet 3 inches. The former mark
was held by Brownell of Illinois and
was established in 1923. White of
Illinois cleared 13 feet to take third
place while Prout of Michigan man-
aged to make 12 feet 6 inches to go
into a triple tie for fifth.
Broad jumping under the existing
conditions was practically impossible
yesterday and Friday's marks stood
in every instance. Simon of Illinois
took first ahead of Capt. Northrop with
a leap of 23 feet 5 1-8 inches, while
Meislahn placed third and Wachowski
fifth to give the Illini nine points in
this event.
Burg Takes High Jump
In the final and deciding event o
the meet Burg of Chicago jumped (
feet 4 4-5 inches to defeat McGinnis
and avenge the defeat sustained i
the indoor, met at the hands of the
Badger captain. Wachowski of Illi
nois outdid himself in this event t
take third place with a jump of 6 feet
3 inches to give his team its winnin
margin.
- For the first time in the history o
Conference track athletic, position:
f for competition in the field event
were drawn by lot as lanes for tracl
events have been for some years. Thi
e was decided at the meeting of coache
on Friday night.
Shot put-Lewis, Northwestern
first; Lyon, Illinois, second; Lovett

-Michigan, third; Forwald, Iowa
P fourth; Karsten, Northwestern, fifth
Distance 47 feet, 1 inch.
- One mile run-McElwee and Stine
t Ill., tied for first; Loomis,' Ohio
1 third; Elliot, Ia., fourth; Fields, Ind
dfifth. Tinme 4:27.1 3-4. 9
440 yard dash-Baird, Ia., first
Stephenson, Ind., seconid; Douga
W Wis., third; Abromson, Ind., fourth
e. Binger Minn., fifth. Time :49.1.
100 yard dsah-Hester, Mich., firsi
n Everingham, Ia., second; Kriss, Ohi
third; Hermanson, Northwester
I fourth; Smith Wis., fifth. Time .09.;

CORRIDEN'S HIT TOO LATE IN
SEVENTH AFTER WEINTRAUTB
IS CAUTIT STEALING
MILLER RELIEVES ASBECK
Lucky Squeeze Play ByrPuckelwartz
Scores Loos In Third After
Iowa Captain Leaves Game
By James Sheehan
In a game full of thrills, errors, and
arguments, Michigan was definitely
eliminated fom the Conference base.
ball race yesterday when Iowa scored
one run in the eighth to win by a
score of 4-3.
The Wolverines looked like sure
winners going into the seventh be-
cause of a three run lead and air-
tight pitching by Fred Asbeck, but for
no reason at all the Hawkeyes began
hitting the ball to all parts of the
field in that inning, and Don Miller
took up the burden with one run in
and two visitors on the bases.
In the course of events both of
these crossed the plate and Michigan's
lead was no more. Then the Hawks,
seeing that three runs were not very
difficult to get, hustled a bit and made
another in the eighth, and with it an
opportunity to ,beat out Illinois for,
the championship.
Michigan Scores First
In the second inning, Michigan began
its scoring. After two were out Ne-
blung walked, stole second, which, by
the way, was the first of his three
steals, went to third on a passed ball,
and scored on "Gabby" Davis' single.
It was the third inning that pro-
duced all the fun. Iowa did nothing,
and in the Michigan half Loos, first
up walked. Corriden sent him to third
with a single, and time out was called
while Twogood, the Hawkeye bride-
groom, was told to take his foot off
the rubber when he threw to first
base. Captain Hoben or Iowa resented
the good advice given his pitcffer,-a-id
was banished from the game for his'
, pains. When play was resumed an ac-
cidental squeeze play by Puckelwartz
-scored Loos.
Neblung Scores
The sixth saw another Michigan run
when Neblung forced Oosterbaan,
stole second, and scored on Davis'
second hit. With the score 3-0, and
Asbeck unhittable things looked
bright, but then the unexpected hap-
pened.
Beardsley singled, and Glassgow
doubled before Asbeck knew what it
was all about. Smith followed with
,another single, which caused Beard-
I sley to score and Miller to be sent in
to pitch. Glassgow scored without the '
aid of a" hit because Davis wasn't
used to Miller's slants and let one go
through him, and 5'mith went to
third on the error, scoring the tying
run a minute later on Thompson's sac-
rifice fly.
In Michigan's seventh Weintraub
' singled with one out but went out
stealing. Corriden followed with a hit,
but it was too late.
Iowa went out to win in the eighth.
The Hawks filled the bases with none
out on two walks and a single, and
McNabb scored while Loos was throw-
ing out Smith.

i

possible and was forced to bow to

t{
1

?Tvrwt LT ,'ANMMav 28.R-HeTrbert

I
t
t
a
3
i
I

NEW Vi'YV AJ JVJy L.-'Ibroke the big Army boming plane
Hoover tonight called upon the NorthL f'ir
'XLB5 ofLangey ied Virgina,
to aid the South in her tremendous' crashed today near here carrying one
task in giving 600,000 victims of the soldier to his death after his four
greatest Mississippi flood in history a comrade ha led t afety fon
new start in life. the hurtling ma'chine in parachutes.
Appeal Is Broadcast Private Daniel LeRoy Yeager, un-
T'he appeal of the commerce sec- able to leave the plane with his com-
retary, who has directed the great ale s, fell with it.' As the crowd
relief machine of the flood, was broad- gathered the two gasoline tanks ex-
cast by 40 radio stations. He asked gathed theowogamslin tank dc-
the nation to contribute $2,000,000 to ploded throwing flanmes in all- direc-
the Red Cross and the northern bank- tions and incinerating the body of the
ers and industries to subscribe s$,500,- dead flier. It is not known whether
000 to the financing agency which will Yeager was killed in thedcrash or
supply funds for the reconstruction whether he was burned to death.
of the refugees of the three hardest n Lt. Bernard M. Bridges, pilot, un-
hithr ges th s . successful in steering his parachute
Mr. Hoover reviewed the devasta-to open ground, was caught in tele-
lion wrought by the flood and des- phone wires and hurtled to the ground
cribed how the relief agencies-the He suffered a badly bruised leg and
greatest in tht nation's history-were I possible internal injuries. He was re-
s' s-wer_. , mnvmv di a hosnital here where it

d
P
0
is
a
t
1'
x
L
c
l!!i
I
!r
i E
.E
it
I

States, that of admitting that every LONDON, May 28.-Londoners are Simon of Illinois. Ted Hornberger
dispute is susceptible of some kind of! determined not to be behind Parisians had company in his misery in the two
peaceful settlement. This means thejin their enthusiasm in greeting Capt. mile run, however, as Hunn of Iowa
omission of the clause, hitherto al- I Charles Lindbergh when he lands atlwas also left without a place.
ways insisted on by the United States Croyden airdome. He is expected to Lewis of Northwestern opened the
in its arbitration treaties, exempting ; reach there about 5:30 tomorr6w eve- meet by setting a new Big Ten record
all questions affecting the "vital in- ning. The airdome authorities expect in the shot put with a toss of 47 feel
terests, independence, or national fully 100,000 spectators; at least they 2 1-2 inches which was 2 inches far-
honor of the United States." have- prepared and roped off exta ther than the mark made by Lyon of
The draft treaty has been sent to ground space to accommodate that Illinois in 1926. Wyckoff of Ohio, an
prominent Americans in political life, }number. early favorite in the mile run, failed
universities, and industrial life thru- Ito place when Stine and McElwe
out the United States. Included with it NA V Y CREW IWINS broke the tape together. .
is a draft of a proposed joint resolu- STUART RACE CUP, Baird Takes Mile
tion of the Senate and House of Rep- Iowa's star quarter miler, Baird
resentatives, requesting the President (By Associated Press) captured his favorite event in the re
of the United States to consider the HI. markably good time of :49.1, whil
expediency of proposing the treaty to Btler's A rf L Navy Varsity crew y -Stephenson trailed the Hawkeve al
the nations of the world. crew carried on to its tenth straight of the distance. Douena of Wiscon
rowing conquest of the season on the sin fought his way to third by a grea
POOLE IS CHOSEN Schuykil tonight when it won the spBi.Hestercaptured Michigan'
TRACK MANAGER tunartanniti'a place by leadingtthepial b
third annualAnmerican Hanley. to mi tpae bytheand in the k
! Princeton, recent conquerors of fast time of .09.9. Hester took the
Selection of Lorne Poole. '28, as Yale, lifted the Child's cup, which lead at the start and was master al
manager for the 1928 track team was was rowed as part of the Stuart cup the way. He never ran s better rac
announced yesterday at Madison by race. It was the Tiger's first Child's I
intt his career.
Coach Farrell. Ie mentioned at the cup conquest since 1922. Wisconsin's captain, McGinnis, ra
same time that the assistants to Poole Navy's spectacular three-quarters of y
will not be named until some time a length victory over the Penn A. C., a greatmace in the 0 yr i

Iowa
AB
Terry, rf r ...........4
McNabb, 2b.........3
Hoben, lb ...........1
Sahs, lb..........3
Beardsley, if .,... 3
Glassgow, ss ........4
Smith, cf..........4
Blackford, 3b .......3
Thompson, c.........4
Twogood, p........1
Mulroney, p ........3

R
0
1
0
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
0

H
0
1
0
-1
1
2
1
0
2
0
1

PO.
2.
5
2
7
0
4
0
1
0
0
0

33 4
Michigan
AB R

82713 5

A'
1
4
1
0
0
1
0
3
3
0
1

E
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
1
1
1
0

C

H

PQ

Loos, ss ...........2 1 0 2
Weintraub, 3b.......4 q 1 2
Corriden, if........5 2 0
Puckelwartz, cf .....3 0 0 2
Kubicek, 2b ........0 0 0 0
Morse, 2b ...........3 0 2 1
Oosterbaan, lb ......4 0 1 13
Nebelung, rf ........3 2 1 2
Davis, c...........3 0 2 5
! Asbeck, p.......... 3 0 0 0
Miller, p ..... ......1 0 0 0
31 3 9 27,

M
r

A
4
2
0
0
0
2
0
0
1
2
0
11

E
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
2

Sumn-aries: Two base hits-Glass-
gow. Sacrifice "hits-Terry, Black-
ford, Loos, Weintraub, Puckelwartz.
Stolen bases-Nebelung (3); Mc Nabb,
Thompson. Base on balls-Off Two

;

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan